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  • FIRST POST
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 1st Jan 18, 11:00 AM
    • 25,469Posts
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    VfM4meplse
    The Bookworm’s Thread 2018
    • #1
    • 1st Jan 18, 11:00 AM
    The Bookworm’s Thread 2018 1st Jan 18 at 11:00 AM
    Welcome to 2018 friends and fellow lovers of literature, and year 3 of the MSE Bookworm's Thread.

    Same principals as the 2016 and 2017 threads, which can be found here, rate it and recommend it if you can. All tastes and genres are welcome. The more we know about the book, the better! Last year 55 of the 60 books I read fully for pleasure were over 300 pages long, 5 were what I would describe as lightweight, perhaps 35% fiction and the rest factual. Many books I started remain unfinished, and I have some cracking fiction on my shelf which deserves my attention this year!

    Recently, I!!!8217;ve found myself having to justify my likeness for books and my ever-expanding collection (people seem to think that shifting over 1,000 of them might have put me off the literary cause somewhat). In simple terms, if you need to remind others of what reading brings, here!!!8217;s a neat explanation: This is How Reading Benefits Your Health.

    Happy reading in 2018, and remember:

    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
Page 9
    • VfM4meplse
    • By VfM4meplse 3rd Apr 18, 11:51 AM
    • 25,469 Posts
    • 54,170 Thanks
    VfM4meplse
    Book 9:



    8/10. Fascinating and very readable, I have no idea why it took me so long to finish! I must have read it in at least 30 sittings, which is silly because it is gripping stuff if you're the analytical type (like me!).

    Make Your Bed: Small things that can change your life... and maybe the world, the man who wrote it was a Navy SEAL and it was quite interesting.
    Originally posted by Wednesday2000
    This was published last year, wasn't it? It's been on my list since then by not yet in my local library. I rather get the impression that it could offer focus to a lot of people.
    Value-for-money-for-me-puhleeze!

    "No man is worth, crawling on the earth"- adapted from Bob Crewe and Bob Gaudio

    Hope is not a strategy ...A child is for life, not just 18 years....Don't get me started on the NHS, because you won't win...If in doubt, don't pull out... I love chaz-ing!
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 3rd Apr 18, 12:58 PM
    • 15,760 Posts
    • 133,904 Thanks
    JackieO
    Just started reading our book club book The History of Love not very thick book but very small print so may take awhile ,but I am enjoying it at the moment
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus.
    2018 Food spend so far this year Three months totals Ł96.53 April Ł8.98 . this morning short shop was 5.62 only bought essentials
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 4th Apr 18, 7:56 AM
    • 1,811 Posts
    • 12,378 Thanks
    Wednesday2000
    I'm reading The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma. Not exactly light-hearted reading but interesting.


    This was published last year, wasn't it? It's been on my list since then by not yet in my local library. I rather get the impression that it could offer focus to a lot of people.
    Originally posted by VfM4meplse
    I'm not sure, I read about it on a blog and bought it on impulse as it was only a couple of quid.
    2018: Simplify your life
    Books Read 22/60
    • Serendipitious
    • By Serendipitious 4th Apr 18, 4:25 PM
    • 5,306 Posts
    • 63,885 Thanks
    Serendipitious


    Four families live in a beautiful stretch of English countryside in magnificent listed houses, built for the old aristocracy. They are the new aristocracy and the elite of their village: financiers, business tycoons, lawyers, doctors, magistrates. They leave their rural idyll only to commute first-class to London for meetings, deals and theatre outings or Heathrow flights to winter sun or half-term skiing. They and their children are protected by investments, pensions and expensive security systems.

    But ..... an unthinkable act of violence destroys these dream lives and demonstrates that the biggest threat may come from unexpected places. This horrific act happens on the first pages but Lawson provides dramatic twists and false turns and it is only by the end of the book that we discover who the victims are and who committed the crime.


    (Synopsis above by PanMacmillan)

    I loved this, it was unputdownable, very filling for a voracious reader, and found it funny/dark, light/dense in equal measure. 10/10
    “All shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of thing shall be well.”




    • Callie22
    • By Callie22 4th Apr 18, 8:08 PM
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    • 8,332 Thanks
    Callie22
    Serendipitous, I really liked The Deaths too - it is very dark but there's enough humour in there to lighten up what is a very serious subject. None of the characters are particularly likeable but it's a well-told story. I recently read The Allegations by the same author and enjoyed that too, but The Deaths was the better novel, I think.
    • Serendipitious
    • By Serendipitious 4th Apr 18, 9:12 PM
    • 5,306 Posts
    • 63,885 Thanks
    Serendipitious
    Serendipitous, I really liked The Deaths too - it is very dark but there's enough humour in there to lighten up what is a very serious subject. None of the characters are particularly likeable but it's a well-told story. I recently read The Allegations by the same author and enjoyed that too, but The Deaths was the better novel, I think.
    Originally posted by Callie22
    Glad you liked it too. It reminded me a bit of some of Jilly Cooper's settings but with a lot more muscle applied to the plotting and characterisation, and plenty of dramatic tension. I'll definitely give some of his others a try.
    “All shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of thing shall be well.”




    • gettingtheresometime
    • By gettingtheresometime 4th Apr 18, 10:06 PM
    • 3,522 Posts
    • 8,730 Thanks
    gettingtheresometime
    Thank you to Gettingthere for the recommendation of Life Death and Vanilla Slices. I'm really enjoying it. Some bits have made me laugh out loud. The main character is the same age as me - a 1960s child so her childhood memories are very familiar.
    I recently gave up reading Faking Friends. It started very well but the plot became far fetched and it turned into a "who can be the most horrible?" By half way through I had no empathy for any of the characters.
    Originally posted by Blackcatsreturns
    I think the moral of FF is (without giving away the ending) is that two wrongs don't make a right. In a way it showed how you could be anyone (or even anywhere) on the internet.

    Will have to see if the library has The Deaths & will order it if they have as it sounds like my sort of book.

    Still struggling with Ready Player One.
    Lloyds OD / Natwest OD / PO CC / Wescott / Argos Card cleared thanks to the 1 debt v 100 day challenge


    Next on the list - JD Williams
    • RicardaRacoon
    • By RicardaRacoon 6th Apr 18, 6:19 PM
    • 239 Posts
    • 4,752 Thanks
    RicardaRacoon
    Evening everyone

    Right after The Guernsey Literate and Potato Peel Pie Society which I really enjoyed I've found another great book and am speeding through it and am really loving it...

    When we meet again - Kristin Harmel
    A woman gets a painting of her grandmother with a note saying "He has never stopped loving her, she was the love of his life." and sets out to find the mysterious sender of the note...
    It was a bit forseenable - as I have read a story with a slightly similar story line - but sooo good and I cried more than once... My cats think I am a !!!!!... :-)

    Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
    Nothing much to say about that, my favourite of all of them as it was the first one I read all these years ago.

    Books I plan to read:

    Everyone brave is forgiven - Chris Cleave
    Harry Potter 3-7
    Russian Winter - Daphne Kalotay. Read it two or three years ago and think I have to reread it...
    Resolution for 2018"Live better on less" - Less stuff, less waste, less silly spends but more make do and mend and more fun
    • Syman
    • By Syman 8th Apr 18, 6:37 PM
    • 2,470 Posts
    • 6,084 Thanks
    Syman
    Hi Guys, it's been a while.

    I have read a few "throwaway" thrillers and....



    Not sure this is a "male" book, but i enjoyed it nevertheless. The blooming personality of Eleanor is delightfully written. The angst she goes through is also sympathetically and sensitively portayed.


    Also...



    Listed as historical fiction, but based on a true account.

    well written account of a Auschwith/Berkenau prisoner and what he had to do to survive.
    Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today!
    Cos if you do it today and like it...You can do it again tomorrow..


    Bookworm's Thread 2018 reading Challenge total :- 15/48
    • sugarbaby125
    • By sugarbaby125 9th Apr 18, 5:51 PM
    • 1,235 Posts
    • 7,909 Thanks
    sugarbaby125
    A Joy to Read
    I just finished reading The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon and it was a completely enthralling read for me.

    This book had me hooked from the 1st few lines of page 1 and kept me wanting to know more even after I had come to the last word of the last page. It is jam packed with unforgettable, believable characters, mystery, love stories and supsense.

    This book was a very well deserved 10/10 for me
    • timehastoldme
    • By timehastoldme 10th Apr 18, 7:05 AM
    • 154 Posts
    • 450 Thanks
    timehastoldme
    Neville Shute: On The Beach.

    The entire population of the northern hemisphere has been wiped out due to nuclear war. In Australia they are waiting out their last few months until the radiation creeps down to them.

    Amazing, harrowing, floods of tears and a brain that couldn't escape this story and probably never will. I'm glad I read it, but know it will haunt me.

    Next up, The Furies by Keith Roberts. More radiation, but this time with massive wasps.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 10th Apr 18, 8:47 AM
    • 23,815 Posts
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    pollypenny
    Neville Shute was a brilliant author. Read his 'A Town like Alice', heartbreaking, but with the positive twist which is not in the film.

    Our book group read Shadow of the Wind simebyears ago. I was disappointed by it.

    Enjoying David Jason's Only Fools and Other Stories now.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Charly27
    • By Charly27 11th Apr 18, 12:14 PM
    • 221 Posts
    • 2,677 Thanks
    Charly27
    I read this last year. Picked it up in a CS in N. Wales and read it whilst nursing my Dad. I was surprised to find what an engaging book it was. Glad you enjoyed it too.
    I just finished reading The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon and it was a completely enthralling read for me.

    This book had me hooked from the 1st few lines of page 1 and kept me wanting to know more even after I had come to the last word of the last page. It is jam packed with unforgettable, believable characters, mystery, love stories and supsense.

    This book was a very well deserved 10/10 for me
    Originally posted by sugarbaby125
    Proud to be dealing with my debts! DF Nerd # 1475
    Books read 10/48
    18 in 2018 3/18
    It is what it is.
    • Charly27
    • By Charly27 11th Apr 18, 12:35 PM
    • 221 Posts
    • 2,677 Thanks
    Charly27
    Callie22 thanks for suggesting I continue with the Cazalet Chronicles. I read ‘Marking Time’ in March and now reading ‘Confusion’. So far in April I read Letters to the Lost by Iona Grey and next term’s class reader [B]How to Train your Dragon by Cressida Cowell.[B][B
    Not sure initially about the children’s book, found myself getting irritated by the constant capitalisation and alliterative character names but then got over myself!
    The Iona Grey book I loved and would recommend that if you enjoy romantic fiction. Thought the descriptions of life in a London during WW2 taught me a lot about the constant threat and privations suffered by people in the previous two generations.
    Proud to be dealing with my debts! DF Nerd # 1475
    Books read 10/48
    18 in 2018 3/18
    It is what it is.
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 14th Apr 18, 10:37 AM
    • 1,811 Posts
    • 12,378 Thanks
    Wednesday2000
    I'm reading The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma. Not exactly light-hearted reading but interesting.
    Originally posted by Wednesday2000
    I haven't even finished this book yet. I haven't read anything else since. I got through stages where I don't read very much at all.

    I'm going to read the new Monevator blog post and then try and read some more of the book in the garden as it seems like milder weather.
    2018: Simplify your life
    Books Read 22/60
    • Serendipitious
    • By Serendipitious 16th Apr 18, 3:05 PM
    • 5,306 Posts
    • 63,885 Thanks
    Serendipitious



    In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is meticulously planned from the layout of the winding roads, to the colours of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.
    Enter Mia Warren, an enigmatic artist and single mother, who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenage daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than just tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the alluring mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past, and a disregard for the rules that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

    I loved this and became thoroughly absorbed by it within the first few pages. Excellent. 10/10
    “All shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of thing shall be well.”




    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 16th Apr 18, 3:40 PM
    • 23,815 Posts
    • 61,993 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Reading The Tidal Zone, by Sarah Moss. Every parents' nightmare - seriously ill child.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Callie22
    • By Callie22 16th Apr 18, 8:41 PM
    • 3,056 Posts
    • 8,332 Thanks
    Callie22
    Reading The Tidal Zone, by Sarah Moss. Every parents' nightmare - seriously ill child.
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    I've read quite a few of Sarah Moss' books, and I've really enjoyed them all. I particularly liked Bodies of Light and Signs for Lost Children - it's hard to describe what they're about but they're a pair of books set at the end of the nineteenth century that broadly cover the life of a young girl who ends up training to be a doctor. That's an awful way of describing them though, as they cover everything from Pre-Raphaelitism to Japanese lighthouses, with asylums in betweem! I'd definitely recommend them. Cold Earth was good too, although it's an entirely different kind of book set in the modern day.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 17th Apr 18, 9:18 AM
    • 23,815 Posts
    • 61,993 Thanks
    pollypenny
    I enjoyed Bodies of Light. Not sure about The Tidal Zone, as I am finding the narrator to be so pretentious! Scorns most things, makes own hummus but could not manage without baby wipes!

    The interwoven account of the building if Coventry Cathedral is interesting.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Serendipitious
    • By Serendipitious 17th Apr 18, 4:26 PM
    • 5,306 Posts
    • 63,885 Thanks
    Serendipitious




    Damian Baxter is hugely wealthy and dying. He lives alone in a big house in Surrey, England, looked after by a chauffeur, butler, cook and housemaid. He has but one concern—his fortune in excess of 500 million pounds, and who should inherit it on his death. Past Imperfect is the story of a quest. Damian Baxter wishes to know if he has a living heir.

    Nice chunky read. I liked this story of a friend tasked with finding out whether any of Damian's former girlfriends actually had a child by him.
    “All shall be well, and all shall be well and all manner of thing shall be well.”




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