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  • FIRST POST
    • demiruss
    • By demiruss 30th Dec 17, 7:04 PM
    • 56Posts
    • 27Thanks
    demiruss
    Where am I going wrong?
    • #1
    • 30th Dec 17, 7:04 PM
    Where am I going wrong? 30th Dec 17 at 7:04 PM
    I'm a grafter and will put my all in to whatever job I'm doing, but I've found myself in low-paid jobs throughout my 20s. I'm educated to postgrad level and not currently working in my field as it's over-saturated, but would like a job with progression and my degrees have a lot of transferable skills. Has anyone got any tips for getting on the career ladder? Admin or anything, although I do love helping people experiencing difficulties and knowing I'm making a difference. I'm fed up of working in roles where I'm doing more than my pay bracket just because my managers know I'm capable. Even my union rep said I was wasted where I am recently and was being taken advantage of, but I still do the work because I'd rather keep myself occupied in work than skive. I'm just in a rut so please be gentle.
    Last edited by demiruss; 30-12-2017 at 7:08 PM.
Page 2
    • StaffieTerrier
    • By StaffieTerrier 1st Jan 18, 7:53 PM
    • 321 Posts
    • 545 Thanks
    StaffieTerrier
    That's a good way to look at it - it's how I got this job come to think of it! The frustrating thing is due to the pay grade and job description, it's a balancing act trying to show how productive you can be without seeming like a busybody. My current manager would probably say get involved with the more social side of the job, but when I'm "living to work" financially and the workplace has a lot of conflict amongst perm staff I prefer not to get too involved as I just want to get in, work and go home.
    Originally posted by demiruss
    Sometimes you need to get out there into the workplace and take an interest on what's going on around you to progress. I've worked through the ranks at my current workplace by taking an interest and making suggestions for improvement to my boss. Colleagues that haven't shown an interest are still in the exact same role 5 years later with no signs of promotion on the horizon. In my work place, you have to be already taking on extra responsibilities to be able to go for promotion, i.e. working above your pay grade.

    As someone else pointed out, you should be taking the opportunity to learn new skills to take them on to develop your CV. Have you ever expressed an interest to your manager(s) that you want to develop beyond a basic admin role?
    • demiruss
    • By demiruss 1st Jan 18, 8:14 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    demiruss
    Sometimes you need to get out there into the workplace and take an interest on what's going on around you to progress. I've worked through the ranks at my current workplace by taking an interest and making suggestions for improvement to my boss. Colleagues that haven't shown an interest are still in the exact same role 5 years later with no signs of promotion on the horizon. In my work place, you have to be already taking on extra responsibilities to be able to go for promotion, i.e. working above your pay grade.

    As someone else pointed out, you should be taking the opportunity to learn new skills to take them on to develop your CV. Have you ever expressed an interest to your manager(s) that you want to develop beyond a basic admin role?
    Originally posted by StaffieTerrier
    I agree, I'd love to do that but I don't want to progress here because it's not what I'd want to do long-term and only took this job through necessity, I'm thinking more about my next role. Unfortunately I couldn't develop any skills here that I don't have already/that would be transferable as it's all basic admin.
    • Nothanks
    • By Nothanks 5th Jan 18, 5:38 AM
    • 123 Posts
    • 135 Thanks
    Nothanks
    I kind of fell into the financial sector because I needed work and suddenly 10 years later I look at a very respectable career path. Your skillset sounds ideal for any risk-focussed role, such as audit, anti-fraud, portfolio management...etc

    Manchester is decent for finance because a lot of big firms are moving out of London due to cost.

    I'd recommend looking at some of the large banks' own recruitment websites.
    • CrabbitDutchie
    • By CrabbitDutchie 5th Jan 18, 6:08 PM
    • 46 Posts
    • 262 Thanks
    CrabbitDutchie
    Statistical programmer/ SAS programmer roles in the pharmaceutical industry might also suit your skillset.It's more about having an analytical mindset than any prior programming experience. I'd certainly never programmed anything before I fell into my previous job.
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    • demiruss
    • By demiruss 6th Jan 18, 6:26 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    demiruss
    I kind of fell into the financial sector because I needed work and suddenly 10 years later I look at a very respectable career path. Your skillset sounds ideal for any risk-focussed role, such as audit, anti-fraud, portfolio management...etc

    Manchester is decent for finance because a lot of big firms are moving out of London due to cost.

    I'd recommend looking at some of the large banks' own recruitment websites.
    Originally posted by Nothanks
    Statistical programmer/ SAS programmer roles in the pharmaceutical industry might also suit your skillset.It's more about having an analytical mindset than any prior programming experience. I'd certainly never programmed anything before I fell into my previous job.
    Originally posted by CrabbitDutchie

    Thanks, both! The job hunt is on again this weekend! At least I've finally learnt what I don't want to do long-term i.e. admin/managing people My contract will be knocked down again this month so I'll be on under £800 p/m.
    • Mrs Soup
    • By Mrs Soup 7th Jan 18, 9:58 AM
    • 525 Posts
    • 1,059 Thanks
    Mrs Soup
    Do you live near a university - if so maybe look at their job vacancies. They do a lot of stats type stuff for government returns and planning purposes and might be interested in your sort of background particularly with some admin experience. Lots of people in university admin tend to be overqualified as we work in the sector because we like the university environment.
    • MrNiceGuy_007
    • By MrNiceGuy_007 7th Jan 18, 12:37 PM
    • 112 Posts
    • 102 Thanks
    MrNiceGuy_007
    Psychology and the masters is in a more maths/big data course.
    Originally posted by demiruss
    Maths and big data, no employment opportunities? Really...

    Excellent math skills and big data are some of the most sought-after talents on the market!

    As a contractor, I certainly have no problem finding work and have found that certifications hold more weight than my degree.

    Is it the lack of experience?

    Quant finance is a good move, how are your coding skills?
    • demiruss
    • By demiruss 8th Jan 18, 4:12 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    demiruss
    Maths and big data, no employment opportunities? Really...

    Excellent math skills and big data are some of the most sought-after talents on the market!

    As a contractor, I certainly have no problem finding work and have found that certifications hold more weight than my degree.

    Is it the lack of experience?

    Quant finance is a good move, how are your coding skills?
    Originally posted by MrNiceGuy_007
    Thanks Well my degrees aren't "hard science"/IT based so it's been difficult I wish I would've done a maths degree or something, I feel like my options are severely limited now. I've undertaken an ECG study and enjoy being in labs so I'm looking in to research assistant posts. Have you got your certifications through work/privately?

    Yes, it's definitely lack of experience because of location = limited opps compared to London, but I also cannot afford to volunteer or do unpaid internships. I would have to do further training to be proficient at coding but have noted the most desirable and am looking into brushing up on/learning those.
    Last edited by demiruss; 08-01-2018 at 4:15 PM.
    • demiruss
    • By demiruss 8th Jan 18, 4:15 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    demiruss
    Do you live near a university - if so maybe look at their job vacancies. They do a lot of stats type stuff for government returns and planning purposes and might be interested in your sort of background particularly with some admin experience. Lots of people in university admin tend to be overqualified as we work in the sector because we like the university environment.
    Originally posted by Mrs Soup
    Thanks, I live near lots I do apply for the admin roles but always get rejected, someone else has "more experience", although a lot of the admin ladies at my last uni got it through word of mouth with little previous office experience. I would love to do some stats stuff, I'm still applying to unis here and there but I don't hold my breath with them
    • StaffieTerrier
    • By StaffieTerrier 9th Jan 18, 8:16 AM
    • 321 Posts
    • 545 Thanks
    StaffieTerrier
    Thanks Well my degrees aren't "hard science"/IT based so it's been difficult I wish I would've done a maths degree or something, I feel like my options are severely limited now. I've undertaken an ECG study and enjoy being in labs so I'm looking in to research assistant posts. Have you got your certifications through work/privately?
    Originally posted by demiruss
    What experience/qualifications do you have to work in a lab? If you don't have any experience you need to try and get some, perhaps unpaid work experience. I work in medical research and research assistant posts can be very competitive, you'll often get people with PhDs in a relevant field applying. If you're interested in lab work you might be better looking at technical posts, such technical assistants, but even those are highly competitive.
    • demiruss
    • By demiruss 9th Jan 18, 5:42 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    demiruss
    What experience/qualifications do you have to work in a lab? If you don't have any experience you need to try and get some, perhaps unpaid work experience. I work in medical research and research assistant posts can be very competitive, you'll often get people with PhDs in a relevant field applying. If you're interested in lab work you might be better looking at technical posts, such technical assistants, but even those are highly competitive.
    Originally posted by StaffieTerrier
    I know, that's what's put me off thus far. Maybe I worded that poorly (doesn't help as all these roles are called different things). I'm not talking long term research posts just those offered to graduates that are short term positions for projects For my dissertation the paid research assistants were looking to me to organise/guide. I can't afford to work for free I would love to be in that position.
    • StaffieTerrier
    • By StaffieTerrier 9th Jan 18, 6:06 PM
    • 321 Posts
    • 545 Thanks
    StaffieTerrier
    I know, that's what's put me off thus far. Maybe I worded that poorly (doesn't help as all these roles are called different things). I'm not talking long term research posts just those offered to graduates that are short term positions for projects For my dissertation the paid research assistants were looking to me to organise/guide. I can't afford to work for free I would love to be in that position.
    Originally posted by demiruss
    Even those types of roles will need experience. Most research science jobs are on short term contracts so there's always high volumes of people to apply for them. How long since you graduated? Science changes rapidly. The experimental work in our lab is completely different from 5-10 years ago and whole new fields of computing have developed to analyse the data we're producing.

    As far as work experience goes, even a week can help and give you contacts. The hardest part of getting a job in science is getting a foot in the door. I've worked in science in HE for over 20 years, both teaching and research and it's harder now than ever to get a foot in the door. I only got my first science job because I'd done lots of work experience and gave myself a head start above other graduates.

    I'm not trying to put a downer on what you want to do but you are going to have to think of a way to stand out and give someone a reason to give you a chance. Good luck. I hope it works out for you
    • ERICS MUM
    • By ERICS MUM 9th Jan 18, 7:20 PM
    • 3,485 Posts
    • 6,470 Thanks
    ERICS MUM
    Apologies if what I write below is a load of rubbish ! I don't really understand the precise line of work you are interested in but these suggestions might help you find what you want, or at least help you accumulate experience of various types.

    What about one of the mammoth accounting/consultancy companies such as KPMG, PWC ? Or Capita ?

    I don't know if the Met Police are still recruiting for senior civilian analysts ? Or the Civil Service ? Worth checking out.

    Major banks such as HSBC have robust graduate schemes, even if you don't see finance as your long term career the training and opportunity to develop workplace & personal skills and behaviours would be invaluable. I believe such schemes have tough application and interview stages, which in themselves would give you experience, insight and confidence. I'm guessing that if you don't succeed in gaining an offer, they would give you detailed and targeted feedback.

    Are there any professional bodies for the career(s) you are interested in, with which employers would advertise jobs ? Have you registered with LinkedIn ?
    Last edited by ERICS MUM; 09-01-2018 at 7:36 PM.
    • demiruss
    • By demiruss 10th Jan 18, 6:32 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    demiruss
    Even those types of roles will need experience. Most research science jobs are on short term contracts so there's always high volumes of people to apply for them. How long since you graduated? Science changes rapidly. The experimental work in our lab is completely different from 5-10 years ago and whole new fields of computing have developed to analyse the data we're producing.

    As far as work experience goes, even a week can help and give you contacts. The hardest part of getting a job in science is getting a foot in the door. I've worked in science in HE for over 20 years, both teaching and research and it's harder now than ever to get a foot in the door. I only got my first science job because I'd done lots of work experience and gave myself a head start above other graduates.

    I'm not trying to put a downer on what you want to do but you are going to have to think of a way to stand out and give someone a reason to give you a chance. Good luck. I hope it works out for you
    Originally posted by StaffieTerrier
    Thanks, StaffieTerrier I know what you're saying. I do have experience - graduated in 2017. The lab assistants then had all recently finished their undergrad degrees and others had got a short stint in other unis with limited experience and went back as they were pursing PhDs or teaching. I'm under no illusion that the jobs I'd be going for would be 'dogsbody' but it would be paid work in a field I'm interested in instead of deadend jobs/unpaid work People on my course got on PhDs without any experience and barely passing the course, I guess it varies?

    Apologies if what I write below is a load of rubbish ! I don't really understand the precise line of work you are interested in but these suggestions might help you find what you want, or at least help you accumulate experience of various types.

    What about one of the mammoth accounting/consultancy companies such as KPMG, PWC ? Or Capita ?

    I don't know if the Met Police are still recruiting for senior civilian analysts ? Or the Civil Service ? Worth checking out.

    Major banks such as HSBC have robust graduate schemes, even if you don't see finance as your long term career the training and opportunity to develop workplace & personal skills and behaviours would be invaluable. I believe such schemes have tough application and interview stages, which in themselves would give you experience, insight and confidence. I'm guessing that if you don't succeed in gaining an offer, they would give you detailed and targeted feedback.

    Are there any professional bodies for the career(s) you are interested in, with which employers would advertise jobs ? Have you registered with LinkedIn ?
    Originally posted by ERICS MUM
    Thank you, Erics Mum. I don't think I understand myself I'm definitely going to look at more graduate schemes, I had an interview for one and they seemed to like the "smarmier" characters as opposed to your knowledge/skills so it put me off, but that was the vibe of the company so on reflection I can see why. I am on LinkedIn but not very active, I think I made one whilst studying. I need to give myself a kick up the bum, it's just hard when you're working (and jaded ).

    Big thanks again to everyone who replied.
    Last edited by demiruss; 10-01-2018 at 6:39 PM.
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