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  • FIRST POST
    • holidayinn
    • By holidayinn 18th Dec 17, 1:17 PM
    • 33Posts
    • 17Thanks
    holidayinn
    New house old shed/garage
    • #1
    • 18th Dec 17, 1:17 PM
    New house old shed/garage 18th Dec 17 at 1:17 PM
    Hi all. Recently moved house and been tackling improvements bit by bit.

    Now moving on to the old shed/garage at the back of the garden. It's not at all pretty (as you can see from the pics) but I think could prove pretty useful for storage/workshop with some tlc/minimum expense.

    My questions are:

    What type of shed/garage is this? I'm having difficulty finding any info on it, not really sure what terms to use in a google search?

    I have already purchased two doors (from ebay, in pic). These are 3 foot in width, however the opening is 8 foot in total. I was thinking of building some type of framework. I would set two fence posts in concrete and affix these to timber stretching the width of the shed. The timber would be screwed to the shed above the doors. I could then use cladding to cover the sides and then hinge the doors on the fence posts.

    Does this sound ok? Any other suggestions?

    Thank you.


Page 1
    • TheCyclingProgrammer
    • By TheCyclingProgrammer 18th Dec 17, 2:22 PM
    • 3,173 Posts
    • 1,851 Thanks
    TheCyclingProgrammer
    • #2
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:22 PM
    • #2
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:22 PM
    Personally I!!!8217;d demolish it and start again.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 18th Dec 17, 2:30 PM
    • 32,185 Posts
    • 19,344 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #3
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:30 PM
    • #3
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:30 PM
    Try concrete sectional.

    What's that roof made of?
    • holidayinn
    • By holidayinn 18th Dec 17, 2:33 PM
    • 33 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    holidayinn
    • #4
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:33 PM
    • #4
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:33 PM
    Unfortunately, budget means that's not an option. As stated it currently looks in poor state, but it's solid and with a little effort can serve a purpose. I was just after some guidance as to how to create the frame to hang the doors and whether my idea will work? Main concern was the fence posts would sag from the weight of the doors, however if I set them deep enough and attach to a horizontal beam (type of thing) it should be fine.
    • holidayinn
    • By holidayinn 18th Dec 17, 2:37 PM
    • 33 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    holidayinn
    • #5
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:37 PM
    • #5
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:37 PM
    Concrete sectional is getting me (at least some image) results! Thank you!

    I reckon it's asbestos cement roof or something like that....
    • spadoosh
    • By spadoosh 18th Dec 17, 2:48 PM
    • 5,191 Posts
    • 6,994 Thanks
    spadoosh
    • #6
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:48 PM
    • #6
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:48 PM
    FYI, dont store any stuff that you plan on wanting or using one day in there.

    If using as a workshop, store tool elsewhere.
    Don't be angry!
    • holidayinn
    • By holidayinn 18th Dec 17, 2:56 PM
    • 33 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    holidayinn
    • #7
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:56 PM
    • #7
    • 18th Dec 17, 2:56 PM
    Thanks, but why do you say that? I was planning to use it for lawnmower, bikes, etc...
    • spadoosh
    • By spadoosh 18th Dec 17, 4:46 PM
    • 5,191 Posts
    • 6,994 Thanks
    spadoosh
    • #8
    • 18th Dec 17, 4:46 PM
    • #8
    • 18th Dec 17, 4:46 PM
    Thanks, but why do you say that? I was planning to use it for lawnmower, bikes, etc...
    Originally posted by holidayinn
    I cant iamgine youll keep water out. Rust will be inevitable.
    Don't be angry!
    • EachPenny
    • By EachPenny 18th Dec 17, 6:39 PM
    • 5,183 Posts
    • 13,833 Thanks
    EachPenny
    • #9
    • 18th Dec 17, 6:39 PM
    • #9
    • 18th Dec 17, 6:39 PM
    The roof is almost certainly asbestos cement. I'd also be suspicious of the triangular panel above the doors and if there is a similar one at the back end.

    The first question is what kind of condition is the roof in? Is there any sign of cracking or internal flaking? If yes, then you need to work on getting a suitable contractor to quote for removing the asbestos. If no, then keep the asbestos risk in mind for anything you do in the future.

    If the roof is ok, then I don't see any problem with using the garage as a storage shed. You'll want to fix the windows (not necessarily with glass) and ensure that there is a seal around the base of the concrete sections where they meet the ground. This was typically done with a concrete 'fillet'... if any of that is cracked or missing then simply repair with some mortar. Likewise, any patches of the wall where the concrete is damaged (I can see one, possibly two on your second photo) should be repaired with mortar (use some PVA glue to aid bonding) to keep water away from the reinforcing.

    As for your plan I would go along with what you say, apart from possibly using 3 (or 4) by 2 rather than fenceposts to make up the infill section, and possibly doing one larger panel on one side rather than two smaller panels each side. Clad the internal side of the infill with waterproof ply to give strength, and the outside with whatever you like for appearance. Rather than burying wood into concrete I would bury short lengths of galvanised steel restraint strap and screw the timber onto them. It will be a lot easier to make the smaller holes you will need to make, or alternatively consider using appropriate fixings to screw short lengths of restraint strap directly to the concrete surface.

    Be very careful fixing the timber at the top of the doorway to avoid damaging the (suspected) asbestos. And under no circumstances attempt to drill or cut anything you suspect could be asbestos.

    Other than that it looks like you have a fun project on your hands.
    "In the future, everyone will be rich for 15 minutes"
    • holidayinn
    • By holidayinn 19th Dec 17, 9:14 AM
    • 33 Posts
    • 17 Thanks
    holidayinn
    Thank you EP. Everything you suggest makes sense.

    I'll have to check the roof in more detail, looks like this will be the major decision to make.

    With the steel galvanised restraint straps, will these really hold the timber straight. I would have thought the timber buried in concrete would be much stronger? Obviously, your suggestion is preferred as seems less work.

    Also, I could screw the timber at the top of the doorway to the posts, but would some adhesive work in keeping it tight to the shed?

    Many thanks,
    • road2manchester
    • By road2manchester 4th Jan 18, 11:41 PM
    • 66 Posts
    • 89 Thanks
    road2manchester



    Same Issues, New roof fitted, New door and the old concrete blockwork done with Stonecoat.

    The roof will almost definetely be Aspestos based cement.

    You can remove yourself but wear appropriate mask gloves and paper suit which all get dumped in the same H-duty marked bags.
    Most council tips will take it bagged.

    Door frames in 4x2 tanalised timber would be OK if you can create a complete rectangle frame fitted to the floor and A-frame. Sides will drill but chemical fix bolts rather than expansion bolts and then plenty of foam should hold.

    good luck
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