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    • SimpleLiving
    • By SimpleLiving 30th Nov 17, 11:27 AM
    • 47Posts
    • 1,446Thanks
    SimpleLiving
    A Simpler Life 2018
    • #1
    • 30th Nov 17, 11:27 AM
    A Simpler Life 2018 30th Nov 17 at 11:27 AM
    Every year at about this time, I get a yearning for a more simple way of life. A life that doesn't involve being bombarded with endless ads for x% off or buy a new sofa/kitchen/table/bed/car or your Christmas holiday will become a fate worse than death It really does get to me. I hate consumerism in general. It annoys me intensely that we waste so many resources making cheap non-essential rubbish that will end up in landfill a few months later. I think I must be some kind of grumpy, odd ball though as despite all the headlines about the economy and stagnant pay rises, the shops always seem to be rammed.
    Anyhow, I am planning to step back from it all in 2018:
    - no spending on unnecessary stuff. For example, I have enough clothes to last for years in one wardrobe and one chest of drawers. Books will come from the library. No fripperies!!
    - replace essential items where possible with good quality items preferably second hand, or british made or local where applicable
    - increase cooking from scratch. I buy too many things like biscuits etc that are far nicer and healthier homemade
    - make full use of garden and allotment for fruit, veg, preserves and wine.
    - forage for fruit, fungi, wood ....
    - spend more time outside, gardening, walking, enjoying nature to improve mental and physical well being
    - spend more time with my mum who is 76 and beginning to need me more
    - avoid pressure to conform!
    Anyone got any further ideas in how I could simplify life?
Page 31
    • Littleskintdragon84
    • By Littleskintdragon84 10th Jan 18, 12:40 PM
    • 25 Posts
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    Littleskintdragon84
    Cottage economy - that's a great idea about the gift vouchers. I still haven't ordered my xmas present from my mother because I'm waiting for it to come down in price first! I refuse to let her pay the full price. Im a grown up I can wait...

    Simple living - every xmas I ask for things like socks,shower gels, pyjamas and slippers. My list is the same every year. Everyone laughs, but I usually get enough shower gel to see me through the year!
    • Cottage Economy
    • By Cottage Economy 10th Jan 18, 1:00 PM
    • 961 Posts
    • 4,044 Thanks
    Cottage Economy
    My sentiments exactly! Kids just don't need so much stuff. They don't cherish things if they have too much. One of my favourite presents as a kid was a small basket with fruit shaped soaps in, for some reason I have always remembered that pressie. I can honestly say I would prefer a nice bar of lavender soap than a designer handbag or useless fancy chef kitchen accessory.
    Originally posted by SimpleLiving
    I agree. It's because people equate love with gifts. A small amount of gifts must mean you don't love them. There is also a trend for buying bigger and better gifts every year.

    I see it with my family. They want to 'demonstrate their love' by ever larger and more expensive gifts every year. If they want to demonstrate their love, they can cook the flipping Christmas dinner to give me a rest! Go out and rake up the leaves so I can lie in the bath and read.

    But no. Let's try and persuade her to have a TV in her bedroom as the poor thing doesn't have one (she doesn't have one because she goes to the bedroom to sleep, not watch TV, and doesn't want that monstrosity taking up space).

    And they take offence when I say no, I don't want it! Arrrggghhhhhh.

    And breathe.
    Last edited by Cottage Economy; 10-01-2018 at 1:06 PM.
    'Save 12k in 2018' 3000/6,000 (50%)


    "...success in personal finance isn't about mastering the technicalities. It is about mastering yourself."
    • bexster1975
    • By bexster1975 10th Jan 18, 1:55 PM
    • 1,193 Posts
    • 5,640 Thanks
    bexster1975
    Due to a significant change in circumstances ( all good, and chosen) I asked for some unusual things too for Christmas. Instead of stuff I asked for my Amazon prime to be paid, national trust membership ( starting from March), local wildlife membership, a magazine subscription and otherwise Amazon vouchers. I don't need any stuff, but these things will be valuable all year, and make my new simpler life easier/cheaper every single month. I didn't have many things to open, but I also haven't needed to find homes for lots of stuff either.

    Bexster
    • Save Dosh
    • By Save Dosh 10th Jan 18, 1:56 PM
    • 1,233 Posts
    • 14,761 Thanks
    Save Dosh
    I would love the onion bhaji & chickpea pancake recipes, mentioned earlier.

    My decluttering is going well, though has slowed down considerably in the last few days, been doing too many lunches and i'm rushing out to meet a friend now, but needed the chats. I have toiletries (today, today ....), Kitchen & pantry & papers left to do, that's it. I really am becoming very minimal. I have a few bits I want to buy, but when something enters the house, i'm gonna try and part with something. I also have a spare room that needs a quick makeover and to be let.

    My lodger got a free month trial of Netflicks and gave me the password, bless - I think we might need to keep it. Yesterday watched 'The True Cost' & 'The Minimalists', I am going to watch 'Rotten' tonight, a documentary about food. Hopefully it will make me feel less begrudging on splashing out on organic.

    Just a quickie, I went into Shoe Zone yesterday to get some boxes and they had a box for recycling old shoes. Really good if you have some that are at their end.
    June Grocery Challenge - Food 27.75/80, Alcohol 7.48/20
    Bulk Fund Left/Food 66.76 Bulk Fund/Alcohol
    -19.48
    Save 12k in 2018 #80 = 2,000/5,000
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    Lose 12lbs - 8/12 - Goal 9st
    • PollyWollyDoodle
    • By PollyWollyDoodle 10th Jan 18, 5:01 PM
    • 959 Posts
    • 23,100 Thanks
    PollyWollyDoodle
    A quick comment re the 'whites' - in olden days those whites were likely to be cotton or linen. These days they're more likely to have polyester or man made fibres included, and it's usually not appropriate to wash them at 60 deg. The man made fibres can attract other colour from the water, and that's why white bras (for example) often end up looking dingy and why it makes sense to wash whites separately. I use Napisan in my white washes, and it keeps things looking nice and bright. For those washing everything at 30 deg, it's worth doing a hot wash occasionally for the sake of your machine, which can develop a bad smell. I do sheets and towels at 60, everything else at 40.
    "Inconceivable". "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
    • wort
    • By wort 10th Jan 18, 6:01 PM
    • 778 Posts
    • 10,209 Thanks
    wort
    I use an eco egg for washing I've had no problems.
    I sort lights and darks clothing. But do separate wash for bedding and towels 60.
    I have to say it's not just whites that look grubby, the uniform we have at work includes a cream blouse, and the number of women that are now sporting a grubby looking blouse is amazing!!! We know who sorts their laundry out!
    Focus on contribution instead of the impressiveness of consumption to see the true beauty in people.
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 10th Jan 18, 6:47 PM
    • 11,811 Posts
    • 164,019 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    One of my favourite 'presents' is a magazine subscription which usually involves some sort of 'offer' for the first 6 copies and getting a magazine through the post once a month feels like 12 presents rather than just one!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • elmer
    • By elmer 10th Jan 18, 6:48 PM
    • 816 Posts
    • 1,424 Thanks
    elmer
    putting her feet up and having a truffle or two.[/QUOTE]

    GreyQueen are you talking about me? and do you want to share the truffles with our feet up?

    elmer
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 10th Jan 18, 6:51 PM
    • 11,898 Posts
    • 229,589 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Only if they're HM rum truffles with real cream, I wouldn't want you to think I was easy, or something........

    I must flit back to the tidying and simplification, things are at that state of disorder where it appears that my flat has been done over by a particularly vicious gang of noctoural light removal experts.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • elmer
    • By elmer 10th Jan 18, 6:55 PM
    • 816 Posts
    • 1,424 Thanks
    elmer
    They are v posh truffles from Costco, She had two bags,which I pointed out was too many for her to eat, so Ive blagged one for me, I too need to get on, Im supposed to be sorting the washing and making tea, not putting my feet up eating forbidden items and MSEing !!

    elmer
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 10th Jan 18, 6:57 PM
    • 11,898 Posts
    • 229,589 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I'm tidying, kondo-ing, waiting for the washer to finish, about to clean a bit of melted stuff off the sole plate of the oven and contemplating a YS run.......... busy busy busy.......
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • CRANKY40
    • By CRANKY40 10th Jan 18, 7:09 PM
    • 2,831 Posts
    • 30,484 Thanks
    CRANKY40

    EDIT - slightly related re the turn-out of one's children - I very deliberately keep my two-year-old son a bit scruffy as part fo my simplification regime. He has a capsule wardrobe consisting only of items that are comfortable, promote freedom of movement and allow as much independence as possible in dressing and pottying (promoting independence is of the values I really adhere to as a parent). So basically all he has is comfortable cotton elasticated jogging bottoms, a range of t-shirts in short and long sleeves, plain white vests, plain cotton pants, socks, PJs and some jumpers, mostly hand-knit by my mum.
    Originally posted by Bluegreen143
    When my small person was at this stage I didn't bother with underpants, I just put his jogging pants straight on. One less thing for him to fight his way out of simplified the potty training even further.
    • Bluegreen143
    • By Bluegreen143 10th Jan 18, 7:13 PM
    • 1,101 Posts
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    Bluegreen143
    Cranky great tip. I actually did that when we started. Ive moved to pants now as hes starting to get the hang of it as well as being easier for dressing, I found at the beginning he seemed much more aware of needing the toilet if he wasnt wearing underpants.
    Married 1 March 2014 DS born 06/12/15

    Debts
    CC - 2,182.17/2,182.17
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    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 10th Jan 18, 7:13 PM
    • 11,811 Posts
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    DD2 has simplified life by deciding NEVER ironing the childrens clothes, they always look clean (except for noses but that's only normal) if a little wrinkled round the edges. the Zebra child calls jogging bottoms 'tricky trousers' as when he first decided that what he liked to wear he couldn't say track suit. It's stuck ...
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 10th Jan 18, 7:39 PM
    • 15,830 Posts
    • 43,837 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    I use an eco egg for washing I've had no problems.
    I sort lights and darks clothing. But do separate wash for bedding and towels 60.
    I have to say it's not just whites that look grubby, the uniform we have at work includes a cream blouse, and the number of women that are now sporting a grubby looking blouse is amazing!!! We know who sorts their laundry out!
    Originally posted by wort
    Though I could sympathise with those that don't wear pale colours of themselves - and might very well take the view "If my employer has decided I will wear pale colours for work = on their head be it and they can just put up with whatever-way-I-personally-choose-to-wash-them".

    I know that's exactly what I would do personally - ie decide that I wasnt going to change my housework routine in the slightest because of Someone Else's choices (ie my employers choice that I'd wear pale colours at work). Down to the employer if anyone didnt like the way I was dressed in those circumstances - and no reflection on me personally at all

    Whew - thinks back to the couple of battles I had on my hands with employers trying to dictate how I dressed at work back in the day - and thanks heaven I'm now retired and there's none of that going on any more Remembering a couple of employers that even thought I should spend my own money on "their" clothes for work - they never managed to get me to do that at least. MY money - so I'd only spend it on clothes of my choice
    How to make the worst decisions you'll ever make. Think "What would the ancestors do?" and (be you a person or a part of a country) you'll make a mistake every time.
    • SmlSave
    • By SmlSave 10th Jan 18, 8:48 PM
    • 4,699 Posts
    • 16,523 Thanks
    SmlSave
    Thank you for commenting about your laundry Bluegreen143. I was thinking that I'd like to join and to simplify my life but they'll never let me join.....don't iron, often wash on 20 and only started sorting my laundry this year! *

    I promise that I'm in good health and don't smell, may I stay?


    *Only do a hot wash to clean the machine or when the nappies needed stripping
    Boy Smllet born 23/06/2011 and Girl Smllet born 01/03/2014

    5 year challenge to pay off 20,000
    350 per month challenge
    • Cottage Economy
    • By Cottage Economy 10th Jan 18, 10:07 PM
    • 961 Posts
    • 4,044 Thanks
    Cottage Economy
    One of my favourite 'presents' is a magazine subscription which usually involves some sort of 'offer' for the first 6 copies and getting a magazine through the post once a month feels like 12 presents rather than just one!
    Originally posted by MrsLurcherwalker
    A woman after my own heart. Even better when it comes with access to a digital back issue archive

    Over the last few days, I've been identifying a few areas I could simplify:
    • Simplifying my laundry. If I put slightly less clothing in the washing machine and get to it quickly enough after it finishes to 'flap' out the clothes, I won't need to iron a good proportion of them.
    • Simplifying my reading habits. I have an online subscription to a weekend newspaper. It's got a bit hectic lately and I haven't looked at it since before Christmas so that can go, saving me 13 a month.
    • Simplifying what I cook. Instead of making a shepherd's pie the other night, I cooked all the ingredients up and served it 'deconstructed' Took half an hour instead of the usual hour. I shall be looking for other recipes to 'deconstruct'.
    • I'm currently getting 25 plus emails day so I am unsubscribing to as many as possible and dumping others into spam. It is always bad before and after Christmas.
    • I have a lot of DVDs to weed out. I made a start this evening and have about 40 for a car boot sale now. Seven of them are going to Ziffit.
    • [deep breath] Confession time. I am a bibliophile and slightly addicted to charity shops. I did a 'stocktake' on paper books and there are a whopping 104 waiting to be read so I'd like to carve out enough time to sit quietly and read 1-2 books a week. I need to spend less time online and more time reading. And no more buying books until these are read. I haven't counted up what is waiting to be read on the kindle or computer. Not brave enough yet.

    This is a good start I reckon.
    'Save 12k in 2018' 3000/6,000 (50%)


    "...success in personal finance isn't about mastering the technicalities. It is about mastering yourself."
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 10th Jan 18, 10:09 PM
    • 11,097 Posts
    • 29,643 Thanks
    suki1964
    Ladies, I have posted this before on other threads, my gynaecologist advised me to wash underwear on a minimum of 40. They grow cultures at 30 in labs. You need to wash undies at a hotter temp to kill any nasties. She explained that thrush for example was becoming more of a problem since low temp washes were becoming the norm.
    if you lend someone 20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • Charis
    • By Charis 10th Jan 18, 11:21 PM
    • 1,289 Posts
    • 13,598 Thanks
    Charis


    When homes had no hot water, and sometimes no piped water at all (like my great-grands' place) keeping self, clothes and homes clean was a tough job, but women had enormous pride in keeping up appearances. Keeping a clean and tidy home was part of the way you maintained your reputation as a decent person, and people cared mightily about being seen to be respectable, even in living memory.
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    I had a moment of deja vu there GQ. Giggling secretly at my dad combing his hair before going out to the coal bunker to bring in a shovel full of coke. Back in the 50's and 60s both genders lived in mortal fear of being thought of as below local standards, especially if they felt they had done a bit of social climbing.
    • Charis
    • By Charis 11th Jan 18, 12:28 AM
    • 1,289 Posts
    • 13,598 Thanks
    Charis

    A lot of the books I buy are often out of print and secondhand, so I can indulge myself. I know my family would refuse to buy me a book if it was secondhand and printed in the 80s, even if I insisted I wanted it!
    Originally posted by Cottage Economy
    That reminded me of the satisfaction I felt when I recently bought an old Readers Digest Complete Guide to Sewing the 1991 reprint of a 1988 classic, because the reviews mentioned it was better than the latest edition. It was a real trip down memory lane, took me right back to my secondary school and learning pattern cutting, and I hope to start dressmaking again when I can source some fabric in the spring. It was inspired by Kittie's Sewing Thread and is a sister book to to the Readers Digest Complete Guide to Needlework (hand sewing) which I also bought second hand from Amazon some years ago. It was recommended by the lovely Rhonda Hetzel, who has a delighful blog on simpler living called Down To Earth and she lives in Australia.


    A quick comment re the 'whites' - in olden days those whites were likely to be cotton or linen. These days they're more likely to have polyester or man made fibres included, and it's usually not appropriate to wash them at 60 deg. The man made fibres can attract other colour from the water, and that's why white bras (for example) often end up looking dingy and why it makes sense to wash whites separately.
    Originally posted by PollyWollyDoodle
    I never though of that. I thought it was the washing liquid, although I do use a leading brand. It does annoy me that especially on dark, plain tops the slightest grease mark will not wash out, even at 40 deg, let alone 30 deg. I have never been happy with a mixed load at 30 deg, I reckon it's the detergent manufacturers' way of getting us to do a wash load every day. Convincing us that we are saving the planet. Most real stains don't shift without the new range of prewash stain shifters (more to spend on and find storage for) and who really believes that things get clean at a temperature that isn't as warm as our blood? I have found an excellent stain remover for food stains in baby clothes. I tried everything to remove a big, deep orange stain from my baby gd's pink dress, but was about to give up when I put it in the sunshine on a bedroom window sill. The dress didn't fade, but the stain disappeared.

    I use Napisan in my white washes, and it keeps things looking nice and bright. For those washing everything at 30 deg, it's worth doing a hot wash occasionally for the sake of your machine, which can develop a bad smell. I do sheets and towels at 60, everything else at 40.
    Very very true. I went to stay at my young son's flat and his washing smelled horrible. the kitchen, which was a fair size, smelt horrible too. Because the smell had built up gradually he hadn't really noticed it. After checking for blockages in the WM sump and pipes, which were clear I suggested he did a 90 deg wash. It seemed to do the trick. A while after I had left he reported that it was still fine. In fact he managed to sell it a few weeks later to the incoming tenant for a few because his new place already had one.
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