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  • FIRST POST
    • anotheruser
    • By anotheruser 28th Oct 17, 6:55 PM
    • 2,601Posts
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    anotheruser
    Wood Burning Stoves
    • #1
    • 28th Oct 17, 6:55 PM
    Wood Burning Stoves 28th Oct 17 at 6:55 PM
    Hi

    I have a couple of questions about wood burning stoves.

    We have an open fire at the moment and burn wooden logs. Although the chimney sweep says coal is more efficient in terms of heat per money spent.

    Looking at a log burner then, what makes these so much more efficient? I guess it limits the amount of heat that goes up the chimney, redirecting it into the room instead?

    Will you not just go through twice the amount of logs?

    Can you burn coal in them?

    How much do they cost to install? I realise prices will vary but a guide price would be good.

    Thanks
Page 1
    • savemoney
    • By savemoney 28th Oct 17, 10:10 PM
    • 12,895 Posts
    • 11,507 Thanks
    savemoney
    • #2
    • 28th Oct 17, 10:10 PM
    • #2
    • 28th Oct 17, 10:10 PM
    You can burn coal usually in multifuel stoves

    You can get around 80+ (probably low 80's) fuel efficency depending on make/model you have to check that out yourself

    I burn wood briquettes made by Verdo that about as good as it gets in terms of heat output for wood. Expensive yes but they take a lot less space than logs and kick out far more heat. Verdo also sold in packs in Home bargains 2.79

    Had my log burner now for 8 years its great but definately not cheap to buy, install and fuel unless you have a very cheap source of fuel

    I think I paid about 2.5k in all that was 8 years ago mind you
    Last edited by savemoney; 28-10-2017 at 10:13 PM.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 28th Oct 17, 11:48 PM
    • 1,258 Posts
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    sevenhills
    • #3
    • 28th Oct 17, 11:48 PM
    • #3
    • 28th Oct 17, 11:48 PM
    I burn wood briquettes made by Verdo that about as good as it gets in terms of heat output for wood. Expensive yes but they take a lot less space than logs and kick out far more heat. Verdo also sold in packs in Home bargains 2.79

    I think I paid about 2.5k in all that was 8 years ago mind you
    Originally posted by savemoney
    Some people that have wood burners get free wood from local places, old pallets or felled trees.

    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 29th Oct 17, 12:34 AM
    • 1,636 Posts
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    FreeBear
    • #4
    • 29th Oct 17, 12:34 AM
    • #4
    • 29th Oct 17, 12:34 AM
    With an open fire, I was using around 10 bags of house coal each winter - It was always difficult to keep the room warm...

    Installed a multifuel stove some 18 months ago (spent around 2K in that room). Used around 2 cubic metres of wood last year, and managed to keep quite warm - Insulating the ceiling and killing off the draughts as part of the renovation has also helped.

    Had a little bit of coal left over from the open fire which I've burnt in the new stove (I know, shouldn't do it, but...). A bucket full seemed to last longer, and there would still be glowing coals in the morning - I really ought to get some smokeless coal in ready for the snow.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 29th Oct 17, 5:31 AM
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    Davesnave
    • #5
    • 29th Oct 17, 5:31 AM
    • #5
    • 29th Oct 17, 5:31 AM
    Money spent on a well-designed woodburner, properly installed, will eventually be recouped, provided it's used a lot. Things can go wrong, as one look at the What Stove? site will testify:

    https://www.whatstove.co.uk/

    We inherited a large old burner, which was using the existing 9" concrete chimney, replacing it with one roughly 2/3 as large, using a new 5" flue. We get the same heat now from much fewer logs and I don't need to clean the stove glass either.

    However, the dryness of the logs is also the key to getting good efficiency. As we have loads of storage space, we keep ours for at least 2 years and seasoned, bought-in ones for a year.

    If we had gas and didn't get a lot of free or cheap wood, I don't think we'd bother with the stove, except on special occasions. We had an efficient gas coal fire in the old house, which was fine and not messy, like logs. The newer ones are even better.

    Edited to add: Our new wood burner cost 1k, the install around the same amount, and a posh new fireplace and hearth was a further 1k. We managed to work with the installer and did the prep and install of the fireplace ourselves, otherwise we'd have paid more and had less choice regarding the way it looks.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 29-10-2017 at 5:37 AM.
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs and use Firefox, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it yet....
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • savemoney
    • By savemoney 29th Oct 17, 10:34 AM
    • 12,895 Posts
    • 11,507 Thanks
    savemoney
    • #6
    • 29th Oct 17, 10:34 AM
    • #6
    • 29th Oct 17, 10:34 AM
    Indeed they do but I doubt its a huge percentage. I used to burn free pallets myself but it gives off far too much heat, so much so that my laminate flooring buckled, I managed to get it to level off. I gave up using pallets as its messy in your car and also time-consuming to break them up. I do get odd one each year which break up for kindling

    I like the briquettes because they last I burn about 6 a day I break them up a little.

    I don't get sufficient heat to heat whole house, it's nice and warm little too warm sometimes 24-26c downstairs and may take chill off a little upstairs

    Some people that have wood burners get free wood from local places, old pallets or felled trees.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    • Heedtheadvice
    • By Heedtheadvice 29th Oct 17, 11:54 AM
    • 834 Posts
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    Heedtheadvice
    • #7
    • 29th Oct 17, 11:54 AM
    • #7
    • 29th Oct 17, 11:54 AM
    More efficient: a far better burn using plenty of oxygen to get a hotter flame and secondary burning. Burns more of the fuel efficiently potentially.

    Better flue generates better draw of air without a great hole for heat to escape up.

    Design allows lots of radiant heat through from glass and convection from stove structure that is not drawn up an open flue.

    Better burn efficiency uses less fuel for similar useable heat output.

    Multicultural stoves can burn most things - but watch out for fuels with paints and preservatives in them such as some second hand wood that can create residues in the flue.

    If I didn't have gas fire/central heating and lots of timber available I would not hesitate to get one!

    Edit: multicultural stoves? Bet that causes a chuckle!
    Last edited by Heedtheadvice; 29-10-2017 at 11:59 AM.
    • SG27
    • By SG27 29th Oct 17, 4:45 PM
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    SG27
    • #8
    • 29th Oct 17, 4:45 PM
    • #8
    • 29th Oct 17, 4:45 PM
    My stove has solid doors so sometimes run it with the doors open for so I can see the flames. It uses probably 3 times the logs and theres very little control over temperature. Its much more efficient with the door shut and airflow controlled.
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 29th Oct 17, 5:28 PM
    • 1,636 Posts
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    FreeBear
    • #9
    • 29th Oct 17, 5:28 PM
    • #9
    • 29th Oct 17, 5:28 PM
    If I didn't have gas fire/central heating and lots of timber available I would not hesitate to get one!
    Originally posted by Heedtheadvice
    Many people, myself included, have gas central heating - For most, a wood stove is more of a lifestyle decision rather than for primary heating.

    Something that has been touched on - One does need plenty of space to store fuel, preferably under cover.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 30th Oct 17, 11:12 AM
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    andrewf75
    We paid just over 1000 to get ours installed. We got the burner from a friend for free.
    Clearly much more efficient than an open fire, but whether its sensible to get one or not depends on where you live, access to fuel, storage, how much you use it etc
    • anotheruser
    • By anotheruser 31st Oct 17, 4:41 PM
    • 2,601 Posts
    • 1,525 Thanks
    anotheruser
    Thanks all.

    Storage for coal / logs isn't a problem as we are prepared with our open fire anyway.

    Will probably stick with that for a few years until I save up the pennies for a burner. Prices can vary for wood. One place charges 90 but the wood is better quality, dried for at least 2 years and the wood is bigger chunks. For the same amount, I could pay 50/60, and although it's been dried, it's not proper hardwood like the other stuff. The logs are also smaller.

    Thanks again.
    • gamston
    • By gamston 2nd Nov 17, 7:24 AM
    • 469 Posts
    • 108 Thanks
    gamston
    I've an old multi-fuel back boiler stove, with glass windows
    it doesn't have a flue adjuster fitted so I'm not able to control the burn well
    it's fitted inline with my oil boiler central heating system
    running just the stove the water temp in the radiators gets to around 32c,
    it does burn a lot of wood each night
    years ago I had a small stove with metal doors, still with a back boiler, when that was running (without the oil boiler) when people came in the front door they were knocked over with the heat
    so before you buy a stove check it out,
    • bmthmark
    • By bmthmark 2nd Nov 17, 9:16 AM
    • 235 Posts
    • 227 Thanks
    bmthmark
    You can burn coal usually in multifuel stoves

    You can get around 80+ (probably low 80's) fuel efficency depending on make/model you have to check that out yourself

    I burn wood briquettes made by Verdo that about as good as it gets in terms of heat output for wood. Expensive yes but they take a lot less space than logs and kick out far more heat. Verdo also sold in packs in Home bargains 2.79

    Had my log burner now for 8 years its great but definately not cheap to buy, install and fuel unless you have a very cheap source of fuel

    I think I paid about 2.5k in all that was 8 years ago mind you
    Originally posted by savemoney

    I've got a wood burning stove (not multi-fuel). Do you know if I can burn wood briquettes in it? or should I stick to just logs?
    • FreeBear
    • By FreeBear 2nd Nov 17, 11:58 AM
    • 1,636 Posts
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    FreeBear
    I've got a wood burning stove (not multi-fuel). Do you know if I can burn wood briquettes in it? or should I stick to just logs?
    Originally posted by bmthmark
    You can burn wood briquettes in your stove without any problem - That's what the briquettes are designed for. You can also burn wood pellets at a push.
    Her courage will change the world.

    Treasure the moments that you have. Savour them for as long as you can for they will never come back again.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 2nd Nov 17, 4:01 PM
    • 1,903 Posts
    • 2,501 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    I burn a mix: wood, pallets, joinery off-cuts and Verdo briquettes. I only pay for the last (not something you can stuff down your skirt at Home Bargains!).

    Pallet wood can burn quickly which is where having a mix works. Start with pallet wood kindling and maybe a few short lengths and put the bigger logs on later, or half a briquette or so. Wood itself varies; I've never burnt ash but oak is good, leylandii much underrated (I debark it first) and I've a supply of chestnut and poplar seasoning for winter 18/19. Some apple too, and my neighbour's wisteria which was delivered in a box in short handy lengths for starting a fire!

    Last night I wanted a bit of quick heat at the end of the evening, so rather than put on a log I shoved on a few short lengths of pallet and some small garden branches. It pays to experiment to get the result you want, but as long as it's dry enough all wood burns.
    • bmthmark
    • By bmthmark 3rd Nov 17, 8:52 AM
    • 235 Posts
    • 227 Thanks
    bmthmark
    You can burn wood briquettes in your stove without any problem - That's what the briquettes are designed for. You can also burn wood pellets at a push.
    Originally posted by FreeBear
    Thanks, I will go and get some
    • eithnemc
    • By eithnemc 11th Jan 18, 4:18 PM
    • 24 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    eithnemc
    Can i get some advice please, my new home has come with a log burning stove. when we went to light the stove it was full of water.

    The builder investigated the chimney and said he had fixed the problem. We cleaned the water out and lit the fire a few times. We still get a lot of water - we can hear the water running down into the stove when it is raining.

    Our builder has sent the Fireplace company out to investigate as the stove is completely full of rust. He says it is condensation and we need to light the fire a few times. Has anyone else had this problem?
    • Heedtheadvice
    • By Heedtheadvice 11th Jan 18, 6:25 PM
    • 834 Posts
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    Heedtheadvice
    we can hear the water running down into the stove when it is raining.
    So you will not be accepting the condensation hypothesis?
    • eithnemc
    • By eithnemc 11th Jan 18, 7:32 PM
    • 24 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    eithnemc
    I asked my neighbours and no one has the same problem. Between builder and supplier passing the buck. I think I will have get a second opinion
    • Happydee83
    • By Happydee83 11th Jan 18, 7:40 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Happydee83
    We are currently in the process of buying a house which as 2 wood burners..they are beautiful..but are they easy to take out as one in the living room is taking up a lot of space to thinking of Taking that one out?
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