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  • FIRST POST
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 20th Oct 17, 4:18 AM
    • 132Posts
    • 11Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    How do I know if my tooth is cracked?
    • #1
    • 20th Oct 17, 4:18 AM
    How do I know if my tooth is cracked? 20th Oct 17 at 4:18 AM
    Hi all,

    I have been struggling with facial pain for many years and I am concerned that one of my teeth is cracked.

    I lost the neighbouring teeth when I was very young due to facial trauma and I'm concerned the tooth in question was right in the firing line and therefore subject to a crack.

    The tooth in question also supported a 4 unit bridge until a couple of years ago (adding to the possibility it may be cracked due to the increased forces).

    If the tooth has been cracked for many years then surely the crack would have propagated by now and therefore be visible on x-rays including a cone beam CT scan?

    The tooth has been root filled and also been subject to apical surgery.

    Whenever I brush my teeth it triggers the pain.

    I am wondering if anyone has has similar experiences etc.

    Sincere thanks.
Page 2
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 1st Nov 17, 7:40 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    Obviously, I can't see you and haven't examined you - but I would have thought so too.

    If a tooth that had cracked 10 years ago didn't show any radiographic evidence (never mind CBCT evidence) of being cracked by now - then I would say it isn't cracked.
    Originally posted by Toothsmith
    Yeah, it does seem unlikely that it is cracked. I am going for another CBCT scan today though.

    I suppose some evidence of an infection would have showed up by now too? That said, I did have a seriously infected tooth once (for quite a long time) and I was told by various dentists there was no infection.
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 1st Nov 17, 7:41 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    In all this time MrHeisenberg has anyone investigated the TMJ/tooth grinding/bruxism possibilities as the cause of your pain? I've assumed previously that they have?
    Originally posted by Toothsmith
    Yeah, my NHS dentist gave me a custom mouth guard and it didn't seem to help. I should give it some more time I suppose.
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 1st Nov 17, 8:05 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    It may be that bruxism is playing a part (I'm being open minded here) but brushing my teeth with an electric toothbrush definitely triggers it, which is why i was wondering if it was a crack. It happens with two electric toothbrushes I have, which are both good quality.

    I understand that tooth brushing is a common trigger amongst TN sufferers.
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 1st Nov 17, 9:14 AM
    • 8,875 Posts
    • 10,560 Thanks
    Toothsmith
    It may be that bruxism is playing a part (I'm being open minded here) but brushing my teeth with an electric toothbrush definitely triggers it, which is why i was wondering if it was a crack. It happens with two electric toothbrushes I have, which are both good quality.

    I understand that tooth brushing is a common trigger amongst TN sufferers.
    Originally posted by MrHeisenberg
    A bite guard can need a bit of time to work - but then again, some people get almost instant relief when provided one.

    You are correct about TN trigger zones.

    Facial pain is an absolute bu&&er for those that suffer it. It sounds from your posts that you are now quite a 'well informed' patient and I'm pretty sure from the investigations that you're having that you're being taken care of as well as you could be. And as I've said, I doubt you're going to find any great new magic ideas from anyone here!

    Providing a decent, well adjusted bite guard for a bruxist is not that simpler task. That might be an avenue worth re-visiting if it hasn't played a too bigger part in your treatment so far - but other than that, the chances of finding a simple 'magic wand' solution are vanishingly small I'm afraid.
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 31st Dec 17, 4:53 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    A bite guard can need a bit of time to work - but then again, some people get almost instant relief when provided one.

    You are correct about TN trigger zones.

    Facial pain is an absolute bu&&er for those that suffer it. It sounds from your posts that you are now quite a 'well informed' patient and I'm pretty sure from the investigations that you're having that you're being taken care of as well as you could be. And as I've said, I doubt you're going to find any great new magic ideas from anyone here!

    Providing a decent, well adjusted bite guard for a bruxist is not that simpler task. That might be an avenue worth re-visiting if it hasn't played a too bigger part in your treatment so far - but other than that, the chances of finding a simple 'magic wand' solution are vanishingly small I'm afraid.
    Originally posted by Toothsmith
    Thanks.

    I've just had another cone beam CT scan and nothing showed up. Consequently, my consultant has discharged me as he believes he has nothing more to offer. I can't help feeling left a bit high and dry.

    I am taking the brave step and looking to get dental implants done (I am taking a big leap of faith that this is not going to make the pain worse).

    Does anyone know if it is possible to your teeth straightened with dental implants in place? I have a problem in that some teeth have drifted towards the gap slightly.
    • wazza99
    • By wazza99 31st Dec 17, 6:43 PM
    • 234 Posts
    • 141 Thanks
    wazza99
    I too suffer random facial and tooth pain, have done for years, the only thing i learnt is DO NOT have teeth removed because you feel it may be them, unless an issue is found. Over the years i have had two removed almost due to insistence from me as i was convinced it was the cause....guess what still there...but now i have two less teeth !!
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 1st Jan 18, 7:47 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    I too suffer random facial and tooth pain, have done for years, the only thing i learnt is DO NOT have teeth removed because you feel it may be them, unless an issue is found. Over the years i have had two removed almost due to insistence from me as i was convinced it was the cause....guess what still there...but now i have two less teeth !!
    Originally posted by wazza99
    Yeah, I've heard of others like you too. This facial pain thing is a serious dilemma!
    • BucksLady
    • By BucksLady 1st Jan 18, 3:24 PM
    • 428 Posts
    • 1,303 Thanks
    BucksLady
    Is your bite right? . My husband was suffering random pains and his dentist could offer no explanation. He decided upon another opinion (dental hospital) and was then told that his bite wasn't right ( a dentist would be able to offer a technical explanation). The answer in his case was to align one of his molars with the application of a wire around the tooth (like a little brace). It took quite a while for the correction to be made, but once it had been, the pain was then eliminated.
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 2nd Jan 18, 12:49 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    Is your bite right? . My husband was suffering random pains and his dentist could offer no explanation. He decided upon another opinion (dental hospital) and was then told that his bite wasn't right ( a dentist would be able to offer a technical explanation). The answer in his case was to align one of his molars with the application of a wire around the tooth (like a little brace). It took quite a while for the correction to be made, but once it had been, the pain was then eliminated.
    Originally posted by BucksLady
    I imagine so but it there could be an issue there. I've been to see 3 consultants and many dentists so one would have thought someone would have spotted something untoward.

    That is quite interesting though, particularly as one tooth was to blame.

    My suspicion is the pain may be due to facial trauma. I lost the front teeth as a result of my brother's aggressive behaviour and around that time I had a nasty cycling accident resulting in a concussion. I fell on that side of my face.

    I also suspect the blood supply to that area isn't very good.

    I've also had a lot of surgery in the area which I suppose hasn't helped such as a lot of apical surgery (apicoectomies) and sinus surgery.

    The problem I have is that a tooth may not appear infected as a result of routine x-rays but, in my experience, a tooth of mine was found to be infected when surgery was done.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 2nd Jan 18, 8:56 AM
    • 37,308 Posts
    • 157,166 Thanks
    silvercar
    Does anyone know if it is possible to your teeth straightened with dental implants in place? I have a problem in that some teeth have drifted towards the gap slightly.
    I was told that the implant will stop further movement and will be sized to fit the current gap. If the drift is only slight, you are better living with it than messing further.

    I have a cracked tooth. Dentist reckons I should leave it alone. It only plays up occasionally. I find rubbing colgate sensitive pro-relief directly onto the tooth twice a day helps considerably.
    • BucksLady
    • By BucksLady 2nd Jan 18, 2:47 PM
    • 428 Posts
    • 1,303 Thanks
    BucksLady
    I've been to see 3 consultants and many dentists so one would have thought someone would have spotted something untoward.
    .
    Originally posted by MrHeisenberg
    I agree, but my husband saw a number of consultants before it was suggested that the origin of his pain was due to his bite. Since the correction was made, he's been absolutely fine.
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 3rd Jan 18, 2:54 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    I was told that the implant will stop further movement and will be sized to fit the current gap. If the drift is only slight, you are better living with it than messing further.

    I have a cracked tooth. Dentist reckons I should leave it alone. It only plays up occasionally. I find rubbing colgate sensitive pro-relief directly onto the tooth twice a day helps considerably.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    I see, thanks. I would keep an eye on that tooth as the crack may get bigger. It is crowned?
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 3rd Jan 18, 2:55 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    I agree, but my husband saw a number of consultants before it was suggested that the origin of his pain was due to his bite. Since the correction was made, he's been absolutely fine.
    Originally posted by BucksLady
    I see. Did he try a bite guard before that?
    • BucksLady
    • By BucksLady 3rd Jan 18, 10:08 AM
    • 428 Posts
    • 1,303 Thanks
    BucksLady
    I see. Did he try a bite guard before that?
    Originally posted by MrHeisenberg
    Yes he did, but the pain remained.
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 27th Jan 18, 4:10 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    I am getting implants done but I am seriously terrified that they are going to make the pain worse, especially with a major bone graft that I need.

    I am still not convinced one of my teeth aren't cracked too. I have noticed when I brush a single tooth with an electric toothbrush it triggers the pain. Anyone else experienced this?
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 28th Jan 18, 3:19 AM
    • 24,406 Posts
    • 96,657 Thanks
    Jojo the Tightfisted
    Have you consulted your GP about any sinus issues? The worst tooth/face pain I have ever experienced (the Kill Me Now And I Genuinely Mean It) type was actually caused by my sinus - no blocked or stuffy nose, no cold or flu symptoms, just pure, white hot pain starting from as I bit into something - which may or may not be entirely coincidental.

    These days, at the slightest twinge of sinus trouble, it's a cold pack on my face, a decongestant tablet from the pharmacist (not the supermarket variety) and two painkillers - but I had to find it all out, it never occurred to anybody that it wasn't a dental problem. Except the very old GP I'd had as a kid (very old school Sri Lankan guy, very supportive of vegetarianism when it was a niche/religious dietary choice, always picked proven 'natural' remedies over modern medication if he thought it was as effective - he'd been told about it by my mother and the message back was to look up Neti Pots. He also mentioned that it probably felt worse when I leant over or did my shoelaces up - which it did.


    Anyhow, obviously not medical advice - but could there be something there worth thinking about and discussing with your GP?
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

    Yup you are officially Rock n Roll
    Originally posted by colinw
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 29th Jan 18, 6:15 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    Have you consulted your GP about any sinus issues? The worst tooth/face pain I have ever experienced (the Kill Me Now And I Genuinely Mean It) type was actually caused by my sinus - no blocked or stuffy nose, no cold or flu symptoms, just pure, white hot pain starting from as I bit into something - which may or may not be entirely coincidental.

    These days, at the slightest twinge of sinus trouble, it's a cold pack on my face, a decongestant tablet from the pharmacist (not the supermarket variety) and two painkillers - but I had to find it all out, it never occurred to anybody that it wasn't a dental problem. Except the very old GP I'd had as a kid (very old school Sri Lankan guy, very supportive of vegetarianism when it was a niche/religious dietary choice, always picked proven 'natural' remedies over modern medication if he thought it was as effective - he'd been told about it by my mother and the message back was to look up Neti Pots. He also mentioned that it probably felt worse when I leant over or did my shoelaces up - which it did.

    Anyhow, obviously not medical advice - but could there be something there worth thinking about and discussing with your GP?
    Originally posted by Jojo the Tightfisted
    Hi,

    Yeah, I've certainly had my fair share of sinus problems so I know where you are coming from. Yes, the pain is seriously debilitating at times.

    I've had sinus surgery and went to see an ENT consultant a year or two ago. He examined me using an endoscope and assured me there was no infection (but suppose he is not infallible).

    The pain does seem to be coming from my mouth, albeit in part, and brushing a certain tooth with an electric toothbrush definitely seems to trigger it. It also radiates to the top of my head which concerns me. I'm pretty sure that if it was all neuropathic it wouldn't do that.

    I went to see a top specialist in regards to facial pain. Her explanation was that it was neuropathic and the head pain was a result of taking too many painkillers (even though I don't tend to take that many). I beg to differ as the pain in my head happens at the same time as the pain in my jaw and it occurs only on one side.

    I do get the sense that no clinician wants to put his/her neck on the line and propose a certain tooth may be the cause.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 29th Jan 18, 12:05 PM
    • 37,308 Posts
    • 157,166 Thanks
    silvercar
    The pain does seem to be coming from my mouth, albeit in part, and brushing a certain tooth with an electric toothbrush definitely seems to trigger it. It also radiates to the top of my head which concerns me. I'm pretty sure that if it was all neuropathic it wouldn't do that.
    I have that from the occasional pain from the tooth with a hairline fracture. The pain moves upwards to my head. But rubbing the tooth with the sensitive toothpaste mentioned in an earlier post relieves the pain in the head as well as in the tooth.

    In answer to your earlier question, it isn't crowned. My dentist reckons we should leave well alone.
    • MrHeisenberg
    • By MrHeisenberg 30th Jan 18, 1:24 AM
    • 132 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    MrHeisenberg
    I have that from the occasional pain from the tooth with a hairline fracture. The pain moves upwards to my head. But rubbing the tooth with the sensitive toothpaste mentioned in an earlier post relieves the pain in the head as well as in the tooth.

    In answer to your earlier question, it isn't crowned. My dentist reckons we should leave well alone.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    It does seem like something is not right with my tooth then.

    Why does your dentist think you should leave it alone? I thought crowning the tooth together with a root canal is the way to go?

    Mine is crowned so that might be hiding something too.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 30th Jan 18, 2:52 PM
    • 37,308 Posts
    • 157,166 Thanks
    silvercar
    It does seem like something is not right with my tooth then.

    Why does your dentist think you should leave it alone? I thought crowning the tooth together with a root canal is the way to go?

    Mine is crowned so that might be hiding something too.
    Originally posted by MrHeisenberg
    It only hurts very occasionally, like once every few months. Also the crack goes from the biting surface to below the gum line, so I don't know that a crown would help. Other than the crack there is no decay on the tooth. He doesn't think the nerve is effected, so a root canal is not needed.

    I think his view is that a root canal and crown on a tooth with no nerve problems is probably overkill until it starts to cause problems.
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