Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Reptile2014
    • By Reptile2014 6th Oct 17, 2:13 AM
    • 3Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Reptile2014
    Damage to neighbours fence
    • #1
    • 6th Oct 17, 2:13 AM
    Damage to neighbours fence 6th Oct 17 at 2:13 AM
    Hello people, I've been doing some diy with a digger in the front lawn taking out conifer stumps and scrapping out the top soil but it has moved the neighbours brick wall. I have agreed that the wall has moved due to my actions and tried to get some quote on fixing it but it is coming to about 1500 which I cannot afford.
    Can someone please tell me if the neighbours can claim it from there home insurance with the cost then recovered from my own insurance.
    Thanks for the advice
Page 1
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 6th Oct 17, 7:29 AM
    • 16,113 Posts
    • 44,330 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:29 AM
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 17, 7:29 AM
    Even if the neighbours could claim someone else's damage on their insurance - then, presumably, they would have some sort of penalty imposed on them for having made a claim (eg an excess) and they would have to pay extra insurance costs in future years because of something that is nothing to do with them.

    Looks like you're going to have to pay up for the damage you've done - to avoid them suffering financial loss in future years.
    *******************
    • Reptile2014
    • By Reptile2014 6th Oct 17, 8:12 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Reptile2014
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:12 AM
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:12 AM
    I will pay for the excess, but I thought home insurance is similar to car insurance where a no fault claim that was recovered does not affect your insurance?
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 6th Oct 17, 8:20 AM
    • 25,520 Posts
    • 93,484 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:20 AM
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:20 AM
    The neighbours should be claiming from your insurers via their insurance, so what you suggest would be OK. See below.
    Last edited by Davesnave; 06-10-2017 at 8:50 AM.
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it. More changes on the way?
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • paddyandstumpy
    • By paddyandstumpy 6th Oct 17, 8:40 AM
    • 1,076 Posts
    • 535 Thanks
    paddyandstumpy
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:40 AM
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:40 AM
    The neighbours should be claiming from your insurance, as the damage was caused by your negligence.

    That's the long and the short of it.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Whilst I agree the damage was caused by the OP's negligence; most household insurers won't accept a claim from a TP. The correct process is for the neighbour to claim off their own insurer and for the insurer to seek a recovery from the OP's home insurer.

    The OP could contribute to his neighbours excess.

    If a full recovery is made the claim value will be zero and shouldnt effect future insurance costs for the neighbour.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 6th Oct 17, 8:45 AM
    • 25,520 Posts
    • 93,484 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:45 AM
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 17, 8:45 AM
    Whilst I agree the damage was caused by the OP's negligence; most household insurers won't accept a claim from a TP. The correct process is for the neighbour to claim off their own insurer and for the insurer to seek a recovery from the OP's home insurer.

    The OP could contribute to his neighbours excess.

    If a full recovery is made the claim value will be zero and shouldnt effect future insurance costs for the neighbour.
    Originally posted by paddyandstumpy
    Thanks, I'm not very bright this morning! Don't think I read to the end of the OP's post.

    Will amend my post
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it. More changes on the way?
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • Warwick Hunt
    • By Warwick Hunt 6th Oct 17, 10:29 AM
    • 1,153 Posts
    • 552 Thanks
    Warwick Hunt
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 10:29 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 17, 10:29 AM
    I will pay for the excess, but I thought home insurance is similar to car insurance where a no fault claim that was recovered does not affect your insurance?
    Originally posted by Reptile2014
    Providing they recover 100% of the cost it may be.
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 6th Oct 17, 10:32 AM
    • 2,099 Posts
    • 2,852 Thanks
    comeandgo
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 17, 10:32 AM
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 17, 10:32 AM
    Does House insurance cover ineptitude in a digger?
    • Reptile2014
    • By Reptile2014 6th Oct 17, 11:59 AM
    • 3 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Reptile2014
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 17, 11:59 AM
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 17, 11:59 AM
    Part of the fence is a single brick wall which the workmanship was not the best. The damage was due to vibrations from the digger and pulling out the roots of the conifer which has been there for a minimum of 25 years.
    • langsmith
    • By langsmith 8th Oct 17, 10:33 PM
    • 80 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    langsmith
    I will pay for the excess, but I thought home insurance is similar to car insurance where a no fault claim that was recovered does not affect your insurance?
    Originally posted by Reptile2014
    Unfortunately not. They have no reason to, they gain nothing in doing so. House insurance is nothing like motor insurance. I'm afraid you'll need to foot the bill or they'll claim against your insurance, as you are liable for damaging their property.
    • Cats are great
    • By Cats are great 9th Oct 17, 10:42 AM
    • 51 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    Cats are great
    If they agree to go down the insurance route you should find out what their excess is, it may be the same as the full cost.

    Also I would deal with it sooner rather than later, if the wall is unable someone could get hurt.
    • Chanes
    • By Chanes 10th Oct 17, 9:06 PM
    • 844 Posts
    • 524 Thanks
    Chanes
    They can claim, you have accepted liability and if they take a legal route you could find you cover their legal costs too. Stay friendly with them, good luck!
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

941Posts Today

8,043Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • RT @thismorning: Worried about your finances? Want tips and tricks for getting the best money-saving deals? Whatever your money matter, @Ma?

  • Morning. I'm on my way to @thismorning first to talk about how to get the most buck (or euros) for your money with? https://t.co/OXkQDilixy

  • Early days but if we weight this vote to the referendum proportions (48:52) then 57% of people currently want secon? https://t.co/zct2KOUWRf

  • Follow Martin