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  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Sam M
    • By Former MSE Sam M 28th Jul 17, 10:44 AM
    • 238Posts
    • 159Thanks
    Former MSE Sam M
    Guide discussion: Universal credit
    • #1
    • 28th Jul 17, 10:44 AM
    Guide discussion: Universal credit 28th Jul 17 at 10:44 AM

    Click reply below to discuss. If you haven!!!8217;t already, join the forum to reply.
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 27-09-2017 at 1:57 PM.
Page 2
    • Ames
    • By Ames 1st Jan 18, 12:05 PM
    • 17,288 Posts
    • 30,457 Thanks
    Ames
    If you are on DLA/PIP you can request a WCA regardless of how many hours you work/how much you earn.

    If you are awarded LCWRA you will get an extra element on your UC (about 318 per month).

    If you are awarded LCW there is no more money.

    In either case you are exempt from 'conditionality' - i.e. jobsearch requirements.

    You can work as many or as few hours as you want.
    Originally posted by WillowCat
    So disabled people have to go through the stress of a WCA to be able to work?

    This is utter, utter madness.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • WillowCat
    • By WillowCat 1st Jan 18, 2:37 PM
    • 808 Posts
    • 984 Thanks
    WillowCat
    So disabled people have to go through the stress of a WCA to be able to work?

    This is utter, utter madness.
    Originally posted by Ames
    Not at all. But they do have to undertake a WCA in order to access more money, and most importantly to get the status of not having to do a set number of hours. It gives them the freedom to work as much or as little as they please - because if they are disabled it's very likely they can't manage full time hours.

    How do you think it should be decided who has this freedom?
    • Ames
    • By Ames 1st Jan 18, 2:52 PM
    • 17,288 Posts
    • 30,457 Thanks
    Ames
    Not at all. But they do have to undertake a WCA in order to access more money, and most importantly to get the status of not having to do a set number of hours. It gives them the freedom to work as much or as little as they please - because if they are disabled it's very likely they can't manage full time hours.

    How do you think it should be decided who has this freedom?
    Originally posted by WillowCat
    The tax credit rules seem to work.

    It seems completely nonsensical that to be able to work someone has to be assessed as unfit to work. It doesn't appear to be the best plan for encouraging people into work.

    I'm thinking of the effect this will have on people like Messed up, who asked the question.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • Smithy2018
    • By Smithy2018 13th Jan 18, 12:02 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Smithy2018
    I'm disabled (muscular dystrophy (progressive no cure)) and have been on Working Tax Credit for over 10yrs, back in September 2017 I had to do a change of circumstances as i had moved house and split from my wife. I was told WTC was no longer available in my area and I would have to change to Universal Credit.

    I had to wait 6 weeks to get my first payment but this only included my housing benefit, I was then told I would have to complete a Limited Capacity to Work form. I asked to be sent this form but was then told I would need to get a Fit Note from my doctor first, record it online then take it to the DWP to be verified. After all that I finally got to complete the form, then had to wait for it to be decided if I'd need go to a medical examination.

    On 9th Jan I finally got confirmed that I am eligible for the Limited Capacity for Work element of UC, but it can't be backdated to the start of my claim cause they only do that if you were on ESA. Because I wasn't on ESA I would have to wait 13 weeks before they can pay me the LCW element (though as 13 weeks had passed since September I would get my first payment on 24 January, but I haven't been told how much). So I have lost 514 a month since September whilst battling to sort out this disability element of UC. All I got from UC was that is the legislation if you want to complain you need to write to your MP.

    It's been a complete nightmare changing over to Universal Credit and financially draining, most of the DWP staff dont seem to be very knowledgeable on UC and queries you post on your journal can take weeks to be answered.

    It certainly doesn't feel like your better off working like the government want you to believe.
    Last edited by Smithy2018; 13-01-2018 at 12:14 PM. Reason: Tidy up
    • Jeanette Adam
    • By Jeanette Adam 7th Feb 18, 3:38 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Jeanette Adam
    Can universal credit use my carers element to pay the rent arrears that they forced me into because I had to wait 6 weeks for my first payment.?
    They awarded me 151..then took it all back for rent arrears. They did not discuss it with me....they just took it.
    • WorldTraveller
    • By WorldTraveller 20th Feb 18, 4:01 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 64 Thanks
    WorldTraveller
    I've just come across this thread and we're in a similar position - my husband works, I look after our two autistic children and we get tax credits and carers allowance. We've managed to save over 16k and so it looks like we will lose all our tax credits (and carers allowance as well I think) when migrated to UC. The government seem to presume people are getting an income from their savings but with such pitifully low interest rates it's hardly anything - and we thought we were being responsible by saving for our children's future needs, new boiler etc, but if we lose the benefits we will rapidly use our savings up.
    • pmlindyloo
    • By pmlindyloo 20th Feb 18, 4:30 PM
    • 11,563 Posts
    • 13,462 Thanks
    pmlindyloo
    I've just come across this thread and we're in a similar position - my husband works, I look after our two autistic children and we get tax credits and carers allowance. We've managed to save over 16k and so it looks like we will lose all our tax credits (and carers allowance as well I think) when migrated to UC. The government seem to presume people are getting an income from their savings but with such pitifully low interest rates it's hardly anything - and we thought we were being responsible by saving for our children's future needs, new boiler etc, but if we lose the benefits we will rapidly use our savings up.
    Originally posted by WorldTraveller
    The latest information available (at least what I can find) suggests that people who are still claiming tax credits at the time of being migrated to Universal Credit will receive transitional protection even though they have savings over 16000.

    https://www.litrg.org.uk/tax-guides/tax-credits-and-benefits/universal-credit
    • konark
    • By konark 22nd Feb 18, 4:44 PM
    • 1,008 Posts
    • 776 Thanks
    konark
    The latest information available (at least what I can find) suggests that people who are still claiming tax credits at the time of being migrated to Universal Credit will receive transitional protection even though they have savings over 16000.

    https://www.litrg.org.uk/tax-guides/tax-credits-and-benefits/universal-credit
    Originally posted by pmlindyloo

    Assuming you don't have a 'change of circumstances' in the next four years or so, which can include working more hours, doing less hours, a house move, jury service or whoops we've accidentally closed your claim please reapply for UC.
    • sizorlegs
    • By sizorlegs 29th Mar 18, 10:28 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    sizorlegs
    I totally agree, I worked for 8.5 y and saved hard and deprived myself of a lot of nice things like a car and holidays. I was made redundant in 2016 and since i had less than 16k i decided to claim UC. I registered as self employed because I'm industrious and just needed a bit of hell until i got myself back on my feet, i hate claiming benefits and for me it was a temporary measure.

    I received my redundacy payment after month 1 of claiming UC so I was told that i wouldn't receive UC for month 2. Fine I thought. They kept paying me for 14 months and then they told me that I was never entitled to UC because after month 1 my capital went over 16k because of my redundancy payment. And now i owe them 12k.

    FUMING!!! I asked them why they didnt tell me 13 months ago but they blamed me even though i wrote in my jourmal every penny that i was paid right from the start.

    I've been told lies over the phone and when i told them to check the recordings they simply say 'im sorry u were told that.' They never listen or accept fault.

    The most I made over a year from my self employment was around 600 pm, not enough to live on but i kept trying.

    They closed my claim down and now i cant respond via my journal but they can do all correspondence is one way because if i want to speak to them i have to ring them so if there are any disagreements or problems its my word against theirs, disgusting!!! These people who work for UC have no heart or soul, maybe one day some of them will lose their jobs and have to claim UC and then see how they like being treated like a dirty criminal
    • Danday
    • By Danday 29th Mar 18, 11:24 AM
    • 354 Posts
    • 63 Thanks
    Danday
    I don't understand how it is possible that someone who has that level of capital should be allowed to claim top up benefits whilst at the same time retain that capital wealth. Surely benefits fall into two camps. Those that relate to the extra costs someone would have due to illness or injury and a safety net for those who have little or no savings are sick/unemployed with no income.

    Pension Credit changed, quite rightly that it is now administered in the same way as Income Support is.

    Something is wrong here I would not have the brass neck to go cap in hand looking for a top up of my income AND have savings that I could have used instead.
    • pmlindyloo
    • By pmlindyloo 29th Mar 18, 11:28 AM
    • 11,563 Posts
    • 13,462 Thanks
    pmlindyloo
    I don't understand how it is possible that someone who has that level of capital should be allowed to claim top up benefits whilst at the same time retain that capital wealth. Surely benefits fall into two camps. Those that relate to the extra costs someone would have due to illness or injury and a safety net for those who have little or no savings are sick/unemployed with no income.

    Pension Credit changed, quite rightly that it is now administered in the same way as Income Support is.

    Something is wrong here I would not have the brass neck to go cap in hand looking for a top up of my income AND have savings that I could have used instead.
    Originally posted by Danday
    What do you mean that Pension Credit has changed and is administered in the same way as Income support?
    • Danday
    • By Danday 29th Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    • 354 Posts
    • 63 Thanks
    Danday
    What do you mean that Pension Credit has changed and is administered in the same way as Income support?
    Originally posted by pmlindyloo
    Up until a few years ago everyone was given an 'Assessed Income Period'. In effect saying that no matter what capital you acquired or what increase in income you had, the PC payments would be made. The case of the tottery winner with millions in the bank continued to receive his full PC entitlement to the end of his AIP.

    Now PC is run along the same lines as Income Support. You are required to inform the DWP of any changes in capital wealth or income. Any increase in income reduces for the PC payments. Also the deprivation rules affect PC, any substantial reduction of capital has to be accounted for whereas under the old system you could do what you wanted with your capital
    • Alice Holt
    • By Alice Holt 29th Mar 18, 1:05 PM
    • 2,135 Posts
    • 2,487 Thanks
    Alice Holt
    just needed a bit of hell until i got myself back on my feet,

    I thought "hell" a good choice of word - more apposite than "help" when it concerns UC!

    They kept paying me for 14 months and then they told me that I was never entitled to UC because after month 1 my capital went over 16k because of my redundancy payment. And now i owe them 12k.
    Originally posted by sizorlegs
    One difference between UC and the legacy payments is that overpayments are always recoverable, even if they have arisen through official error.
    So, even if the claimant has supplied all the required info on time if UC get their calculations wrong, the claimant is liable for the DWP error.

    The claimant can not challenge the o/p but can -
    1) Make their MP aware of the impact of Parliament's decision:
    2) Make a complaint - https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-work-pensions/about/complaints-procedure
    3) Try for financial redress for maladministration - https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/671381/financial-redress-for-maladministration-dwp-staff-guide.pdf
    • Danday
    • By Danday 29th Mar 18, 6:07 PM
    • 354 Posts
    • 63 Thanks
    Danday
    One difference between UC and the legacy payments is that overpayments are always recoverable, even if they have arisen through official error.
    So, even if the claimant has supplied all the required info on time if UC get their calculations wrong, the claimant is liable for the DWP error.

    The claimant can not challenge the o/p but can -
    1) Make their MP aware of the impact of Parliament's decision:
    2) Make a complaint - https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-work-pensions/about/complaints-procedure
    3) Try for financial redress for maladministration - https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/671381/financial-redress-for-maladministration-dwp-staff-guide.pdf
    Originally posted by Alice Holt
    You right Alice.
    However most claimants will feel down trodden and abused by the state so probably won't get beyond number 1 in your list even if they actually get that far.
    • Floxxie
    • By Floxxie 25th Apr 18, 7:24 PM
    • 2,829 Posts
    • 5,283 Thanks
    Floxxie
    I wonder how many people are not going to be eligible for Universal Credit as their circumstances will change before the transition period is in place?
    • MV85
    • By MV85 29th Apr 18, 9:44 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    MV85
    Mv
    Does anyone know how to speed process, almost 7 weeks since applied?
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