Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • UncannyScot
    • By UncannyScot 22nd Apr 17, 8:30 PM
    • 1,712Posts
    • 9,450Thanks
    UncannyScot
    Lost in a good book? What are you reading?
    • #1
    • 22nd Apr 17, 8:30 PM
    Lost in a good book? What are you reading? 22nd Apr 17 at 8:30 PM
    Quite simple, probably been done or tried before...
    MSE Readers' Club

    What are you currently reading?

    Favourite authors and genres etc

    A wee place to talk about books...
    BUGGRITMILLENIUMHANDANDSHRIMP I TOLD EM! - Foul Ole Ron
    It is important that we know where we come from, because if you do not know where you come from, then you do not know where you are, and if you don't know where you are, then you don't know where you are going. If you don't know where you're going, you're probably going wrong.
    R.I.P. T.P.
Page 9
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 3rd Aug 18, 8:38 AM
    • 25,372 Posts
    • 66,610 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Ames, have you read any more Graham Green?

    Excellent writer, subtle but dark, yes. I read all his work years ago and am slowly revisiting them as I replace Penguins I can no longer read with ebooks.

    I read The Quiet American in the spring. Captures idealistic incompetence and the despair of the ex-pat.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 3rd Aug 18, 8:52 AM
    • 14,943 Posts
    • 28,235 Thanks
    onlyroz
    I've just been given a book by a new author, Sarah Ward. It's called 'A Bitter Chill'.

    Good page turner, not great lit.

    Just finished rereading Brighton Rock. My god, now that's a man who could write!
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    I love Brighton Rock. I read most Graham Greens when I was in my teens. Should prob go back to them.
    • Pollycat
    • By Pollycat 3rd Aug 18, 8:53 AM
    • 21,189 Posts
    • 57,192 Thanks
    Pollycat
    I seem to be doing favourite books and movies this summer.

    I finished A Passage to India yesterday and watched the film. Loved it. There was a huge thunder and rainstorm outside while I was watching that really added to the courtroom aftermath. The power went out, I didn't care, it was great!

    Today I started Rebecca and I've lined up the blu-ray for when I finish.

    After that, Rebecca's Tale, I guess but I've not ready that before and I'm not sure whether it's a good idea.
    This is because I read Wide Sargasso Sea after Jane Eyre earlier this year and I rather wish I hadn't.
    Originally posted by Quizzical Squirrel
    Daphne Du Maurier?
    I love that book.
    I have an omnibus: Rebecca, Frenchman's Creek, My Cousin Rachel & Jamaica Inn. They've all been filmed (2 starring Joan Fontaine).
    And Nevil Shute: On the Beach, No Highway and A Town like Alice. All been filmed too.

    They don't make 'em like that anymore.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 3rd Aug 18, 8:56 AM
    • 14,943 Posts
    • 28,235 Thanks
    onlyroz
    On audio i've been working my way through Phillip Pullman's back catalogue. I read the Dark Materials series years ago but wanted to revisit it after recently trying La Belle Sauvage. They really are excellent - certainly not just kids books, and in places the themes are very adult.

    I'm also continuing my way through the works of Wilkie Collins, who is most definitely my favourite Victorian author. I recently finished Armadale, which was brilliant, and I'm currently half way through No Name.

    I'm now 2/3 of the way through Peter Hamilton's Nights Dawn trilogy but I'm giving it a rest. I'll start on The Naked God once I've finished with Pullman.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 3rd Aug 18, 8:59 AM
    • 14,943 Posts
    • 28,235 Thanks
    onlyroz
    Oh and I also listened to The Handmaid's Tale on audio by Margaret Atwood. I have to say that I didn't like it much. Very little actually happened and I don't think the scenario was very believable either. I read it because I was curious about the TV show but if the show is anything like the book I don't think I'll bother.
    • Ames
    • By Ames 3rd Aug 18, 11:45 AM
    • 17,724 Posts
    • 31,340 Thanks
    Ames
    Ames, have you read any more Graham Green?

    Excellent writer, subtle but dark, yes. I read all his work years ago and am slowly revisiting them as I replace Penguins I can no longer read with ebooks.

    I read The Quiet American in the spring. Captures idealistic incompetence and the despair of the ex-pat.
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    I haven't read any more by him, although I have a couple on my 'to be read' bookcases.

    I've been trying to implement a 'one in, one out' policy, but I've read too many good books lately so need to read some rubbish ones to make room!

    Daphne Du Maurier?
    I love that book.
    I have an omnibus: Rebecca, Frenchman's Creek, My Cousin Rachel & Jamaica Inn. They've all been filmed (2 starring Joan Fontaine).
    And Nevil Shute: On the Beach, No Highway and A Town like Alice. All been filmed too.

    They don't make 'em like that anymore.
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    I haven't read My Cousin Rachel but I loved the other ones. I think what I like most about Daphne Du Maurier is how wide ranging she is, every book is completely different.

    I read Castle d'Or a few months ago, which was started by someone else and finished by her. I wasn't keen on the first half but much preferred hers.

    I'm currently reading Lud in the Mist by Hope Mirrlees. It's a fantasy written in the 1920s which has been reissued. I'm loving it, I think it was very ahead of it's time. Unfortunately, it's yet another good book...
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • fibonarchie
    • By fibonarchie 3rd Aug 18, 11:59 AM
    • 904 Posts
    • 1,559 Thanks
    fibonarchie
    Oh and I also listened to The Handmaid's Tale on audio by Margaret Atwood. I have to say that I didn't like it much. Very little actually happened and I don't think the scenario was very believable either. I read it because I was curious about the TV show but if the show is anything like the book I don't think I'll bother.
    Originally posted by onlyroz

    The Handmaid Snail it gets called in our house.. dreadfully tedious and slow-going, we've given up on it, tbh.
    Signature Removed by Forum Team ..thanks to somebody reporting a witty and decades-old Kenny Everett quote as 'offensive'!!
    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 5th Aug 18, 11:11 PM
    • 703 Posts
    • 2,385 Thanks
    dustydigger
    Woo-hoo,found this thread by chance.

    I was stalking Uncanny Scot,peeping at what threads he had created (I am a nosy so and so!I have seen so many of his excellent and supportive posts all over the place,and was curious to know more about him)

    Its late at night,got to go to bed,but I will surely be back. I've been a bookaholic since I was small. Still remember getting Beatrix Potter's The Tale of Mr Jeremy Fisher for my 4th birthday.
    I am an active member of LibraryThing, what my son calls Facebook for book nerds,and do a variety of book challenges on there,which I am sure I will love boring you with! Because of real life problems my reading time has gone down a lot(spending lots of time here on MSE doesnt help either) but I will probably manage to read about 150 books in 2018. My tally is around the 100 mark at the moment.
    My fave genres are science fiction,some fantasy (but not much),urban fantasy,YA ,children's classics,vintage and modern crime, and a scattering of other genres,but not erotica,war books,or chick lit,and almost no non fiction- to my shame.
    Was a massive reader of crime books but the last few years that has tailed off,I am not too keen on the modern style,with ''heroes'' little better than the villains,or who have dysfunctional lives,all dark and depressing.I have enough problems in real life,and at 70 I reserve the right to reading books with nice characters and happy endings!I no longer have the nerves of steel that let me read gruesome serial killer books without turning a hair!

    I still yearn for the old style heroes,ethical and principled,but I am sure to be ranting a lot about that on this thread over time
    Will definitely be back tomorrow to read through the thread and probably annoy a lot of people when I make known my opinions of some crime novels which are massively popular,which I dont like them.
    See you tomorrow.
    Have subscribed.
    SPC 2019 # 012 - 2 Savers 2018 #19 218 House & Home Fund 2019 - 20 (+ c/f from 2018= 531) AF Mar-Nov 269 days+ Dec 13/24 Books read 2018:153 Prolific 3.45 /
    total savings 2018:1992card xmas savings 2018:145

    • Spidernick
    • By Spidernick 5th Aug 18, 11:26 PM
    • 2,987 Posts
    • 5,902 Thanks
    Spidernick
    Woo-hoo,found this thread by chance.
    Originally posted by dustydigger
    Me too!

    With regards to Graham Greene (note the 'e' on the end), one of the things I found interesting with his writing was that he generally struggled to start his novels. Once he got into them they were excellent, but the beginnings tended to be quite poor. There is, of course, one notable exception to this: Brighton Rock has possibly the strongest opening to a novel ever (which makes it all the more surprising that he couldn't get anywhere close to this usually).

    I would be interested in what others think about this, as I don't think I am alone in this view and remember discussing it years ago on another forum to which I used to contribute.
    'I want to die peacefully in my sleep, like my father. Not screaming and terrified like his passengers.' (Bob Monkhouse).

    Sky? Believe in better.

    Note: win, draw or lose (not 'loose' - opposite of tight!)
    • Ames
    • By Ames 6th Aug 18, 1:35 AM
    • 17,724 Posts
    • 31,340 Thanks
    Ames
    I don't read as much as I used to either, dusty digger. There's two reasons for this - since I needed reading glasses I just can't read as quickly. I used to read about 100 pages an hour, now I'm down to about one page a minute. Although for most of last year I couldn't read much at all, because of needing the glasses. I finally twigged when I kept having to move the book further away to have enough space to turn the pages...

    The other reason is Netflix.

    My aim was to read 100 books this year (a few years ago it was usually closer to 150). I'm on 69 so a bit ahead. I hadn't heard of Library Thing, I'll check it out. I joined Good Reads at the beginning of the year which has made it easier to keep track of what I've read.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • Ames
    • By Ames 6th Aug 18, 1:37 AM
    • 17,724 Posts
    • 31,340 Thanks
    Ames
    Me too!

    With regards to Graham Greene (note the 'e' on the end), one of the things I found interesting with his writing was that he generally struggled to start his novels. Once he got into them they were excellent, but the beginnings tended to be quite poor. There is, of course, one notable exception to this: Brighton Rock has possibly the strongest opening to a novel ever (which makes it all the more surprising that he couldn't get anywhere close to this usually).

    I would be interested in what others think about this, as I don't think I am alone in this view and remember discussing it years ago on another forum to which I used to contribute.
    Originally posted by Spidernick
    I tried to read another of his last year, but gave up on it after a few pages. I can't remember which it was, but I'll try and find it to give it another after reading your post.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 6th Aug 18, 10:29 AM
    • 703 Posts
    • 2,385 Thanks
    dustydigger
    I don't read as much as I used to either, dusty digger. There's two reasons for this - since I needed reading glasses I just can't read as quickly. I used to read about 100 pages an hour, now I'm down to about one page a minute. Although for most of last year I couldn't read much at all, because of needing the glasses. I finally twigged when I kept having to move the book further away to have enough space to turn the pages
    Originally posted by Ames

    Hi Ames!Call me Dusty
    I have never been the fastest reader,but made up for it by reading every spare second,including while cooking. Some old books have the sauce stains to prove it!

    I used to read at about 40-50 pages an hour,but now I can only manage about 30 pages,and tire rather quickly,which has drastically slowed things down
    And then along came the internet,notorious chronovore (including MSE!) and my tally has gone down drastically.256 books read in 2011,this year struggling to meet my goal of 150.
    LibraryThing is similar to Goodreads but less social,more aimed towards cataloguing our reads I have been putting my books read lists online since 2012. I also added any books read that I at least remembered most of the story,or at least the ambience,and now have a ''shelf'' of 4055 books read.Its fun to nostalgically browse through my ''library'' now and again,though it always makes me want to rush off and reread old favourites,something I rarely have time to do.
    I'm even toying with the idea of having a whole year of nostalgia,only doing rereads of beloved old books.At 70,the years to do a thorough sweep of my old books are getting less
    Last edited by dustydigger; 06-08-2018 at 6:02 PM.
    SPC 2019 # 012 - 2 Savers 2018 #19 218 House & Home Fund 2019 - 20 (+ c/f from 2018= 531) AF Mar-Nov 269 days+ Dec 13/24 Books read 2018:153 Prolific 3.45 /
    total savings 2018:1992card xmas savings 2018:145

    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 6th Aug 18, 10:45 AM
    • 703 Posts
    • 2,385 Thanks
    dustydigger
    The Handmaid Snail it gets called in our house.. dreadfully tedious and slow-going, we've given up on it, tbh.
    Originally posted by fibonarchie


    I was no fan either. Occasionally ''slipstream'' fiction grabs the attention of the wider public,but I have found many of my SF reading fans,like myself, are rather underwhelmed by such works. Adding a few SF elements to a book which is just didactically hammering home some agenda isnt really enough.
    It can work of course,some of the most famous books also beloved by the mainstream are iconic in the SF/F world,eg Brave New World and 1984.
    SPC 2019 # 012 - 2 Savers 2018 #19 218 House & Home Fund 2019 - 20 (+ c/f from 2018= 531) AF Mar-Nov 269 days+ Dec 13/24 Books read 2018:153 Prolific 3.45 /
    total savings 2018:1992card xmas savings 2018:145

    • UncannyScot
    • By UncannyScot 6th Aug 18, 10:54 AM
    • 1,712 Posts
    • 9,450 Thanks
    UncannyScot
    Hi Dusty

    Thanks for joining in...
    Haven't heard of Library Thing, so I'll be checking that out
    My fave crime authors are Jo Nesbo and the late, great, Sir Terry Pratchett (I will defy anyone that denies that Sam Vimes is one of the greatest cop / detectives EVER! )

    My reading time has reduced a lot as well due to demands of work and life in general; used to get through a couple of books a day at one time.
    I have found my Kindle to be an excellent way to keep up with my reading, however, it will not replace my love of a proper book.
    BUGGRITMILLENIUMHANDANDSHRIMP I TOLD EM! - Foul Ole Ron
    It is important that we know where we come from, because if you do not know where you come from, then you do not know where you are, and if you don't know where you are, then you don't know where you are going. If you don't know where you're going, you're probably going wrong.
    R.I.P. T.P.
    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 6th Aug 18, 11:02 AM
    • 703 Posts
    • 2,385 Thanks
    dustydigger
    Daphne Du Maurier?
    I love that book.
    I have an omnibus: Rebecca, Frenchman's Creek, My Cousin Rachel & Jamaica Inn. They've all been filmed (2 starring Joan Fontaine).
    And Nevil Shute: On the Beach, No Highway and A Town like Alice. All been filmed too.

    They don't make 'em like that anymore.
    Originally posted by Pollycat
    Today not so many people are aware of Du Maurier,which is sad,the woman was multi-talented,and was a towering figure back in her own time.She just seemed to write rattling good stories,including excellent short stories,often very dark,some also filmed like The Birds and Dont Look Now.

    My personal favourite(apart of course from Rebecca) is The Scapegoat,where she didnt go for the sentimental ending(unlike a film version with Emilia Fox I saw recently)
    I am still looking round for a copy of The House on the Strand.
    SPC 2019 # 012 - 2 Savers 2018 #19 218 House & Home Fund 2019 - 20 (+ c/f from 2018= 531) AF Mar-Nov 269 days+ Dec 13/24 Books read 2018:153 Prolific 3.45 /
    total savings 2018:1992card xmas savings 2018:145

    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 6th Aug 18, 11:32 AM
    • 703 Posts
    • 2,385 Thanks
    dustydigger
    At the moment I am halfway through Fred Hoyle's The Black Cloud,written in 1952,about a cloud approaching earth from space which might block off the sunlight and freeze the earth.
    A lot of the establishment tut-tutted at Hoyle ,then an internationally famous scientist because of the Steady State/Big Bang debate then raging(he invented the phrase ''big bang'',though in a derogatory way!) for demeaning himself writing ''trash''. I suppose Brian Aldiss would dismiss it as a ''cozy catastrophe'' as he called John Wyndham's work,but I am quite enjoying it.

    A few years later Hoyle wrote A for Andromeda,which made a star of the young Julie Christie.
    I still remember being riveted to the programme. I was about 13 at the time.
    SPC 2019 # 012 - 2 Savers 2018 #19 218 House & Home Fund 2019 - 20 (+ c/f from 2018= 531) AF Mar-Nov 269 days+ Dec 13/24 Books read 2018:153 Prolific 3.45 /
    total savings 2018:1992card xmas savings 2018:145

    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 6th Aug 18, 12:06 PM
    • 14,943 Posts
    • 28,235 Thanks
    onlyroz
    I don't read as much as I used to either, dusty digger. There's two reasons for this - since I needed reading glasses I just can't read as quickly. I used to read about 100 pages an hour, now I'm down to about one page a minute. Although for most of last year I couldn't read much at all, because of needing the glasses. I finally twigged when I kept having to move the book further away to have enough space to turn the pages....
    Originally posted by Ames
    Have you tried audio books? I listen to them in the car on the way to work, or when I'm doing chores around the house. I find they tend to put me to sleep if I'm just sitting or lying down though...
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 6th Aug 18, 12:07 PM
    • 14,943 Posts
    • 28,235 Thanks
    onlyroz
    Me too!

    With regards to Graham Greene (note the 'e' on the end), one of the things I found interesting with his writing was that he generally struggled to start his novels. Once he got into them they were excellent, but the beginnings tended to be quite poor. There is, of course, one notable exception to this: Brighton Rock has possibly the strongest opening to a novel ever (which makes it all the more surprising that he couldn't get anywhere close to this usually).

    I would be interested in what others think about this, as I don't think I am alone in this view and remember discussing it years ago on another forum to which I used to contribute.
    Originally posted by Spidernick
    I'm mortified that I spelled his name wrong...


    As for his openings, it's been a while since I read a Greene, although I'm now tempted to go back to them.


    There are also a number of excellent Graham Greene film adaptations - Brighton Rock, The End of the Affair, The Quiet American and Travels with my Aunt to name a few...
    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 6th Aug 18, 6:39 PM
    • 703 Posts
    • 2,385 Thanks
    dustydigger
    Have you tried audio books? I listen to them in the car on the way to work, or when I'm doing chores around the house. I find they tend to put me to sleep if I'm just sitting or lying down though...
    Originally posted by onlyroz

    Oh dear,sorry but I cant stand them!
    They seem to go at a snail's pace.I find the narrators voice really intrusive,and going back to check something up is well nigh impossible.Back a bit,whoops too far,forward a bit,darn it missed it again! I read a lot of science fiction,and while audio versions of action and adventure stuff might be OK,or straightforward romances,in SF you need to absorb often complex ideas,and audio just isnt right IMO.Sometimes the actual typography or introductions to chapters in a different font are important,

    I will leave it till the day my eyes pack in and I HAVE to listen instead of look!
    SPC 2019 # 012 - 2 Savers 2018 #19 218 House & Home Fund 2019 - 20 (+ c/f from 2018= 531) AF Mar-Nov 269 days+ Dec 13/24 Books read 2018:153 Prolific 3.45 /
    total savings 2018:1992card xmas savings 2018:145

    • Ames
    • By Ames 6th Aug 18, 7:53 PM
    • 17,724 Posts
    • 31,340 Thanks
    Ames
    Hi Ames!Call me Dusty
    I have never been the fastest reader,but made up for it by reading every spare second,including while cooking. Some old books have the sauce stains to prove it!

    I used to read at about 40-50 pages an hour,but now I can only manage about 30 pages,and tire rather quickly,which has drastically slowed things down
    And then along came the internet,notorious chronovore (including MSE!) and my tally has gone down drastically.256 books read in 2011,this year struggling to meet my goal of 150.
    LibraryThing is similar to Goodreads but less social,more aimed towards cataloguing our reads I have been putting my books read lists online since 2012. I also added any books read that I at least remembered most of the story,or at least the ambience,and now have a ''shelf'' of 4055 books read.Its fun to nostalgically browse through my ''library'' now and again,though it always makes me want to rush off and reread old favourites,something I rarely have time to do.
    I'm even toying with the idea of having a whole year of nostalgia,only doing rereads of beloved old books.At 70,the years to do a thorough sweep of my old books are getting less
    Originally posted by dustydigger
    I've been wanting to re read a few of my favourite sci-fi/fantasy series, but I always seem to find new books to buy instead.

    Hi Dusty

    Thanks for joining in...
    Haven't heard of Library Thing, so I'll be checking that out
    My fave crime authors are Jo Nesbo and the late, great, Sir Terry Pratchett (I will defy anyone that denies that Sam Vimes is one of the greatest cop / detectives EVER! )

    My reading time has reduced a lot as well due to demands of work and life in general; used to get through a couple of books a day at one time.
    I have found my Kindle to be an excellent way to keep up with my reading, however, it will not replace my love of a proper book.
    Originally posted by UncannyScot
    Sam Vimes is great, but I've always had a soft spot for Nobby. The scene in Guards! Guards! where he's trying to boil a kettle on errol is one of my favourite ever.

    Have you tried audio books? I listen to them in the car on the way to work, or when I'm doing chores around the house. I find they tend to put me to sleep if I'm just sitting or lying down though...
    Originally posted by onlyroz
    I can't get on with them, I just tune out. It's the same if I try to listen to a radio drama, or go to a live reading. I'm not even great at sitting and watching TV or a film, I have to be doing something else at the same time (hence spending so much time reading MSE).
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

244Posts Today

1,401Users online

Martin's Twitter