Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • UncannyScot
    • By UncannyScot 22nd Apr 17, 8:30 PM
    • 1,667Posts
    • 9,067Thanks
    UncannyScot
    Lost in a good book? What are you reading?
    • #1
    • 22nd Apr 17, 8:30 PM
    Lost in a good book? What are you reading? 22nd Apr 17 at 8:30 PM
    Quite simple, probably been done or tried before...
    MSE Readers' Club

    What are you currently reading?

    Favourite authors and genres etc

    A wee place to talk about books...
    BUGGRITMILLENIUMHANDANDSHRIMP I TOLD EM! - Foul Ole Ron
    It is important that we know where we come from, because if you do not know where you come from, then you do not know where you are, and if you don't know where you are, then you don't know where you are going. If you don't know where you're going, you're probably going wrong.
    R.I.P. T.P.
Page 10
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 6th Aug 18, 8:05 PM
    • 1,893 Posts
    • 2,999 Thanks
    coffeehound
    I've not read much recently due to major upheaval, but have been picking at The Martian by Andy Weir. It's good for people who like authentic technical details and explanations and it is delivered in a humorous, sardonic and sweary style.

    Wish I hadn't seen the film first, though, as knowing the ending has blunted my enthusiasm a bit. (Note to self: always read the book first in future.)
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 6th Aug 18, 10:37 PM
    • 14,570 Posts
    • 27,630 Thanks
    onlyroz
    I've not read much recently due to major upheaval, but have been picking at The Martian by Andy Weir. It's good for people who like authentic technical details and explanations and it is delivered in a humorous, sardonic and sweary style.

    Wish I hadn't seen the film first, though, as knowing the ending has blunted my enthusiasm a bit. (Note to self: always read the book first in future.)
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    Artemis is also pretty good.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 6th Aug 18, 10:40 PM
    • 14,570 Posts
    • 27,630 Thanks
    onlyroz
    Oh dear,sorry but I cant stand them!
    They seem to go at a snail's pace.I find the narrators voice really intrusive,and going back to check something up is well nigh impossible.Back a bit,whoops too far,forward a bit,darn it missed it again! I read a lot of science fiction,and while audio versions of action and adventure stuff might be OK,or straightforward romances,in SF you need to absorb often complex ideas,and audio just isnt right IMO.Sometimes the actual typography or introductions to chapters in a different font are important,

    I will leave it till the day my eyes pack in and I HAVE to listen instead of look!
    Originally posted by dustydigger
    It's true that some are terrible (the biggest crime being not leaving enough of a gap between scene changes) but many are excellent. My preferred genre is fantasy - the audio versions of Joe Abercrombie, Peter Brett and Scott Lynch are incredible. The Robert Jordan books are utterly dire, narrated in a dreary monotone. As for sci-Fi I enjoy the Peter Hamilton's.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 6th Aug 18, 10:41 PM
    • 14,570 Posts
    • 27,630 Thanks
    onlyroz
    I can't get on with them, I just tune out. It's the same if I try to listen to a radio drama, or go to a live reading. I'm not even great at sitting and watching TV or a film, I have to be doing something else at the same time (hence spending so much time reading MSE).
    Originally posted by Ames
    I prefer to be doing something else at the same time like driving or the laundry or weeding the garden. If I just sit and listen then I tend to fall asleep.
    • UncannyScot
    • By UncannyScot 6th Aug 18, 10:44 PM
    • 1,667 Posts
    • 9,067 Thanks
    UncannyScot
    I've not read much recently due to major upheaval, but have been picking at The Martian by Andy Weir. It's good for people who like authentic technical details and explanations and it is delivered in a humorous, sardonic and sweary style.

    Wish I hadn't seen the film first, though, as knowing the ending has blunted my enthusiasm a bit. (Note to self: always read the book first in future.)
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    Additional note, 99% of the time, the book/s is/are better than the film or TV adaptation
    BUGGRITMILLENIUMHANDANDSHRIMP I TOLD EM! - Foul Ole Ron
    It is important that we know where we come from, because if you do not know where you come from, then you do not know where you are, and if you don't know where you are, then you don't know where you are going. If you don't know where you're going, you're probably going wrong.
    R.I.P. T.P.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 6th Aug 18, 10:52 PM
    • 14,570 Posts
    • 27,630 Thanks
    onlyroz
    Additional note, 99% of the time, the book/s is/are better than the film or TV adaptation
    Originally posted by UncannyScot
    I actually think that The Martian is a rare exception to this rule.
    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 7th Aug 18, 12:48 AM
    • 638 Posts
    • 2,105 Thanks
    dustydigger
    Ah,Uncanny Scot,you are a Vimes fan.
    For me,my favourite Discworld characters are Death,who of course ALWAYS TALKS LIKE THIS,and Lord Vetinari, the Patrician.
    Terry once said that he pictured Alan Rickman in the role,and now that is who I see and hear when reading about him.Wonderful character.
    I also have a soft spot for Mort,as well as The Luggage,which got more and more lethal as time went on......there is something quite disturbing about those hundreds of feet busily running along ,carrying the luggage to devastate its next victim.
    Ah Terry,so sad that that we lost you far too soon.........

    SPC 2018 # 012 -
    2 Savers 2018 #19 178 Tesc* Xmas Savers 61.56
    Icel@nd bonus card 14 House & Home Fund 2018 - 322 (plus 174 from 2017 = 496)
    weight loss : 0/7lb AF Mar-Sep 208 days+ Oct 13/24 Books read Oct 4/8 Prolific 12.25

    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 7th Aug 18, 9:04 AM
    • 24,933 Posts
    • 65,142 Thanks
    pollypenny
    My hearing is not goid enough for audiobooks, clarity not volume.

    If a book is well written, I hear the characters voices, anyway. Try Sebastian Barry's Days Without End. Superb!

    I've just finished a Lee Child, which was passed on to me. Tripwire - good page turner. OH is reading it now.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 7th Aug 18, 12:01 PM
    • 1,893 Posts
    • 2,999 Thanks
    coffeehound
    Additional note, 99% of the time, the book/s is/are better than the film or TV adaptation
    Originally posted by UncannyScot
    I actually think that The Martian is a rare exception to this rule.
    Originally posted by onlyroz
    Also Carl Sagan's 'Contact' was a good read, but the film developed the story much further.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 7th Aug 18, 4:27 PM
    • 14,570 Posts
    • 27,630 Thanks
    onlyroz
    Also Carl Sagan's 'Contact' was a good read, but the film developed the story much further.
    Originally posted by coffeehound
    And the least said about "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" the better...
    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 7th Aug 18, 5:39 PM
    • 638 Posts
    • 2,105 Thanks
    dustydigger
    And the least said about "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" the better...
    Originally posted by onlyroz
    Oh dear,not a Blade Runner fan? True there isnt a lot of connection between story and film,but I loved the film,and......wait for it........ I dont enjoy PKD s work at all!
    Do Android Dream of Electric Sheep,Man in the High Castle,Galactic Pot Healer,not my cup of tea. Only put up with Dies Irae because it was co-written my beloved Roger Zelazny.
    Couldnt believe it when I perused the prestigious SF Masterworks,and found that the166 books there had been penned by 93 authors in all - PKD had an unprecedented 13 books on the list.many more than anyone else. And in my public library system,only a pitiful 11 of the Hugo winners were available,whereas they had an incredible 23 of Dicks work !
    ..........Oh is the pillory ready......hmm,nice selection rotten eggs and slimy carrots.
    I am though ready to listen to any PKD aficionados' explanations of just what it is I am missing!
    ---------------one interesting thing that amuses me about Blade Runner is that the producers bought minor SF author Alan Nourse's book Blade Runner,just for the title. They threw the whole book in the trash . Ouch,what an insult.

    SPC 2018 # 012 -
    2 Savers 2018 #19 178 Tesc* Xmas Savers 61.56
    Icel@nd bonus card 14 House & Home Fund 2018 - 322 (plus 174 from 2017 = 496)
    weight loss : 0/7lb AF Mar-Sep 208 days+ Oct 13/24 Books read Oct 4/8 Prolific 12.25

    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 7th Aug 18, 5:56 PM
    • 638 Posts
    • 2,105 Thanks
    dustydigger
    Dusty's August Reads
    1. Kevin Hearne - Besieged.
    Enjoyable short story collection of tales about Atticus Finch and his friends in the UF Iron Druid series. Just good relaxing fun ,a light break from heavier SF stuff
    2. Clifford D Simak - Time and Again
    As ever with Simak the book was enjoyable and thought provoking,redolent with loving descriptions of his beloved Wisconsin landscape.I did find there was rather a lot of philosophical musings which slowed down the tale,and it was a little too long,but still a good read. But Way Station is still my favourite Simak.
    3.Sons of the Ocean Deepsby Bryce Walton was a rather cute little tale,one of the Winston Classics juvenile SF series of the early 50s.A young man has washed out of space training and halfheartedly goes off to join a deep sea diving expedition intending to go into the Mindinao Trench to set off atomic bombs to ease pressure on the earth's crust. The obligatory bully is there of course and its a difficult coming of age story,where the hero's bravery and principles win the day after a lot of suffering.But the extrapolation of man's exploration of the seas in the future is well done and exciting.
    I couldnt quite grasp what was slightly askew in the tale till it became clear that the tectonic plates theory hadnt percolated into junior fiction yet,the whole story depended on the idea of the earth's crust being a solid thing,with volcanoes merely vents to ease pressure. Anyway yet another enjoyable entry in the series..
    Books in progress at the moment are N K Jemisin's The Obelisk Gate and Andrew Lang's The Yellow Fairy Book.,plus Qiu Xialong's The Red Mandarin Dress,an Inspector Chen detective story
    I always have at least 3 books on the go at once!
    Last edited by dustydigger; 07-08-2018 at 5:58 PM.

    SPC 2018 # 012 -
    2 Savers 2018 #19 178 Tesc* Xmas Savers 61.56
    Icel@nd bonus card 14 House & Home Fund 2018 - 322 (plus 174 from 2017 = 496)
    weight loss : 0/7lb AF Mar-Sep 208 days+ Oct 13/24 Books read Oct 4/8 Prolific 12.25

    • Spidernick
    • By Spidernick 7th Aug 18, 7:49 PM
    • 2,925 Posts
    • 5,758 Thanks
    Spidernick
    Additional note, 99% of the time, the book/s is/are better than the film or TV adaptation
    Originally posted by UncannyScot
    I agree, but The Last of the Mohicans was a book I had to give up on, as I found it like walking through treacle, whereas the film (Daniel Day-Lewis and Madeleine Stowe) is one of my favourite movies of the 1990s ('Stay alive and I will find you!').
    'I want to die peacefully in my sleep, like my father. Not screaming and terrified like his passengers.' (Bob Monkhouse).

    Sky? Believe in better.

    Note: win, draw or lose (not 'loose' - opposite of tight!)
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 7th Aug 18, 9:22 PM
    • 14,570 Posts
    • 27,630 Thanks
    onlyroz
    Dusty, Blade Runner (and it's sequel) is a fantastic film. "Do Androids..." went totally over my head. Not tried anything else by PKD as a result.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 7th Aug 18, 9:24 PM
    • 14,570 Posts
    • 27,630 Thanks
    onlyroz
    My hearing is not goid enough for audiobooks, clarity not volume.
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    As I listen to them in the car, clarity is important. I struggle with female narrators in particular - their voices tend to get lost along with the road rumble. The best by far is Stephen Fry, although Ian Holm's reading of The Woman in White is near perfect.

    The His Dark Materials trilogy on audio is unusual - it has a full cast with Pullman himself doing the narrator part.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 8th Aug 18, 11:22 AM
    • 24,933 Posts
    • 65,142 Thanks
    pollypenny
    As I listen to them in the car, clarity is important. I struggle with female narrators in particular - their voices tend to get lost along with the road rumble. The best by far is Stephen Fry, although Ian Holm's reading of The Woman in White is near perfect.

    The His Dark Materials trilogy on audio is unusual - it has a full cast with Pullman himself doing the narrator part.
    Originally posted by onlyroz


    I agree on voices, as my hearing loss is on the higher register. I used to love the Sunday serial on R4 and save my ironing up for it. (Usually great adaptations of wordy novels popular in the 19th century. )

    Now I iron to Steve Wright in the Afternoon!
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • UncannyScot
    • By UncannyScot 8th Aug 18, 3:25 PM
    • 1,667 Posts
    • 9,067 Thanks
    UncannyScot
    I have listened to a few audio-books over the years and my favourites are;
    Tony Robinson's readings of Sir Terry Pratchett's books, he just seems to get it spot on with his narration
    The Song of Ice and Fire series (GoT) narrated by Roy Dotrice, again his voice is just perfect for these... and I sincerely hope he gets to complete the series.
    Lenny Henry's narration of Neil Gaimans Anansi Boys is also excellent.
    Like others have mentioned, they are great for listening to on long car journeys

    My apologies - A friend has informed me that Roy Dotrice passed away in October of last year at the age of 94...
    Last edited by UncannyScot; 08-08-2018 at 5:58 PM. Reason: Updating / Correction
    BUGGRITMILLENIUMHANDANDSHRIMP I TOLD EM! - Foul Ole Ron
    It is important that we know where we come from, because if you do not know where you come from, then you do not know where you are, and if you don't know where you are, then you don't know where you are going. If you don't know where you're going, you're probably going wrong.
    R.I.P. T.P.
    • dustydigger
    • By dustydigger 8th Aug 18, 4:34 PM
    • 638 Posts
    • 2,105 Thanks
    dustydigger
    I needed to read a play for a LibraryThing challenge,and for another challenge ,the A-Z Title Challenge I needed a title beginning with ''U''.
    Killed two birds with one stone by reading Dylan Thomas's masterpiece,Under Milk Wood

    I saw the TV version way back in 1964 I think,and was riveted. I come back to it every so often and am always amazed by the freshness,the humour, the poignancy and the scintillating inspired language. Brilliant

    SPC 2018 # 012 -
    2 Savers 2018 #19 178 Tesc* Xmas Savers 61.56
    Icel@nd bonus card 14 House & Home Fund 2018 - 322 (plus 174 from 2017 = 496)
    weight loss : 0/7lb AF Mar-Sep 208 days+ Oct 13/24 Books read Oct 4/8 Prolific 12.25

    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 8th Aug 18, 7:21 PM
    • 14,570 Posts
    • 27,630 Thanks
    onlyroz
    I have listened to a few audio-books over the years and my favourites are;
    Tony Robinson's readings of Sir Terry Pratchett's books, he just seems to get it spot on with his narration
    The Song of Ice and Fire series (GoT) narrated by Roy Dotrice, again his voice is just perfect for these... and I sincerely hope he gets to complete the series.
    Lenny Henry's narration of Neil Gaimans Anansi Boys is also excellent.
    Like others have mentioned, they are great for listening to on long car journeys

    My apologies - A friend has informed me that Roy Dotrice passed away in October of last year at the age of 94...
    Originally posted by UncannyScot
    The Tony Robinson version of the Pratchett books are abridged so I never bothered with them. Nigel Planer read the unabridged versions and they're very good.
    • UncannyScot
    • By UncannyScot 8th Aug 18, 7:48 PM
    • 1,667 Posts
    • 9,067 Thanks
    UncannyScot
    Oooo Must try these as I've heard Nigel narrating before and he's good. Strangely enough, I've always imagined him as Rincewind

    Also think that Dame Maggie Smith would be an astoundingly good Granny Weatherwax and Miriam Margoyles an excellent Nanny Ogg and the late Emma Chambers was who I always imagined as Magrat Garlick
    Last edited by UncannyScot; 08-08-2018 at 7:56 PM.
    BUGGRITMILLENIUMHANDANDSHRIMP I TOLD EM! - Foul Ole Ron
    It is important that we know where we come from, because if you do not know where you come from, then you do not know where you are, and if you don't know where you are, then you don't know where you are going. If you don't know where you're going, you're probably going wrong.
    R.I.P. T.P.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

218Posts Today

1,582Users online

Martin's Twitter