Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 12th Feb 17, 9:56 AM
    • 1,767Posts
    • 18,219Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    £67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed....
    • #1
    • 12th Feb 17, 9:56 AM
    £67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed.... 12th Feb 17 at 9:56 AM
    £67,031.92. Seriously. £67,031.92. That is a SCARY number. I can't believe our debt has peaked (and it is the peak, I am determined) at this level.

    Our light bulb moment actually happened a few months back, but it's taken since then of wrangling utilities and carefully watching out income/outgoings (using You Need a Budget) to really figure out where we were overspending and how the monthly shortfall of anything from £200-£1,000+ was happening.

    We have literally nothing to show for this debt, it's just crept up over the past 8 years or so, and has always been at manageable levels, but back in October we realised we were spending more on credit cards each month than we were paying off.

    We committed that cardinal sin of taking out a consolidation loan, but alongside it we looked really carefully at our spending over the next couple of months, budgeted realistically for what we spend and have (I think) picked off all the easy 'low hanging fruit' of budget cuts and really identified why we were overspending.

    The main reason for the debt is, erm, me. Not that I'm the biggest spender (neither of us are amazing), but because I am self employed with a hugely variable income and basically worked out our budgets on the basis I would always earn my 'best' month's income. Which was, with hindsight, maybe a TINY bit deluded.

    The aim of this diary is to keep us on track with actually reducing our debt every single month, not doing it in a three steps forward, two (or four) steps back sort of way. Having sat down and put our numbers into the whatsthecost site, it appears that we are looking at 7 years and 1 month of repayments to clear the debt (and that's assuming we can get rid of the shortfall showing below). I REALLY want to reduce this term as that just seems bonkers.

    SOA below, with a couple of explanatory notes.

    Statement of Affairs and Personal Balance Sheet

    Household Information

    Number of adults in household........... 2
    Number of children in household......... 3
    Number of cars owned.................... 1

    Monthly Income Details

    Monthly income after tax................ 250 (variable, but this is the minimum I have earned in any month in the last 5 years)
    Partners monthly income after tax....... 2711.86
    Benefits................................ 192
    Other income............................ 0
    Total monthly income.................... 3153.86


    Monthly Expense Details

    Mortgage................................ 698
    Secured/HP loan repayments.............. 0
    Rent.................................... 0
    Management charge (leasehold property).. 0
    Council tax............................. 174 (including overpayment for a period when we messed up during a house move 18 months ago and didn't restart the direct debit for the new property. Will drop by a little under £50 after either March or April, can't remember which)
    Electricity............................. 52 (gas and electricity are one combined DD, I haven't checked the exact split but the total is £104)
    Gas..................................... 52
    Oil..................................... 0
    Water rates............................. 104 (also including a debt from previous property, but I think this will be included for another 6 months or so. I'm not sure what our actual usage is)
    Telephone (land line)................... 18.5 (includes internet)
    Mobile phone............................ 85 (£45 for my contract, which I use for work as well, £40 for DH)
    TV Licence.............................. 12.12
    Satellite/Cable TV...................... 0
    Internet Services....................... 0 (included in landline cost)
    Groceries etc. ......................... 520 (Includes £40 for one lot of school lunches. I am REALLY struggling to reduce this, but feel I could and should be able to!)
    Clothing................................ 100 (growing children, plus see notes below re clothes)
    Petrol/diesel........................... 225 (90% DH commuting costs)
    Road tax................................ 16.27
    Car Insurance........................... 25.22
    Car maintenance (including MOT)......... 30
    Car parking............................. 0
    Other travel............................ 50
    Childcare/nursery....................... 70 (this will disappear in April as child 3 gets free 15 hours)
    Other child related expenses............ 81.85 (music/swimming lessons x2, cubs and beavers, National Trust membership as they love visiting them)
    Medical (prescriptions, dentist etc).... 5
    Pet insurance/vet bills................. 0
    Buildings insurance..................... 27.07
    Contents insurance...................... 0
    Life assurance ......................... 16.26
    Other insurance......................... 0
    Presents (birthday, christmas etc)...... 90
    Haircuts................................ 20
    Entertainment........................... 135
    Holiday................................. 75
    Emergency fund.......................... 25
    Total monthly expenses.................. 2707.29



    Assets

    Cash.................................... 0
    House value (Gross)..................... 210000
    Shares and bonds........................ 0
    Car(s).................................. 800
    Other assets............................ 0
    Total Assets............................ 210800



    Secured & HP Debts

    Description....................Debt......Monthly.. .APR
    Mortgage...................... 173733...(698)......3.14
    Total secured & HP debts...... 173733....-.........-


    Unsecured Debts
    Description....................Debt......Monthly.. .APR
    Barclaycard....................6880.21...156...... .0
    MBNA...........................9614.71...98....... .0
    Parental loan..................20000.....0.........0 (see notes below)
    Tesco loan.....................21000.....377.......10
    Total unsecured debts..........57494.92..631.......-



    Monthly Budget Summary

    Total monthly income.................... 3,153.86
    Expenses (including HP & secured debts). 2,707.29
    Available for debt repayments........... 446.57
    Monthly UNsecured debt repayments....... 631
    Amount short for making debt repayments. -184.43


    Personal Balance Sheet Summary
    Total assets (things you own)........... 210,800
    Total HP & Secured debt................. -173,733
    Total Unsecured debt.................... -57,494.92
    Net Assets.............................. -20,427.92


    Created using the SOA calculator at stoozing.
    Reproduced on Moneysavingexpert with permission, using other browser.


    Regarding the (relatively) high clothes expense, it is a combination of 3 growing children (8, 6 and 3), plus the fact that my job is in the fashion industry, and as a self employed person I need to have the right sort of 'look' in order to get work (think along the lines of a self employed personal shopper - people need to see you looking good in order to book with you).

    The parental loan was for a house deposit. The parent in question has no idea about our debts. She is not desperate for the money back and isn't charging us interest, but has asked us to save £150-200 every month into a savings account and then once we've saved a decent sum to either repay them or 'reborrow' it for work on the house (basically they want us to be able to make repayments if they suddenly need the extra income, but meanwhile are happy for us to benefit from it. I am not saving the money while our debt payments are so high - we are hoping to have paid enough off that if the parent ever needs it that we can reborrow it and pay them back). This isn't great, but realistically I think the best solutions is to treat it as the lowest priority for snowballing - once we have paid back the other debts we will throw the entire £630+ at this debt.

    So, there is a freaking enormous shortfall every month, which is somewhat depressing. Most months it is covered by the fact that I earn more than my 'bare minimum', but it is those months where it isn't covered that the debt creeps up again, and I am a total disaster for going 'oh well, we've spent on the credit card, we might as well keep going' and buying more clothes or something for the house - this is probably a significant proportion of our debt problem.

    We have managed to get rid of the balance on the one credit card we were spending on, so the remaining ones are both on 0% deals (although one expires in September). I have not cut up the remaining credit card, because we don't have an emergency fund in case of eg boiler repairs, but it has not been used for all of a month, and I hope to keep it that way.

    A DMP or similar isn't really on my horizon right now - I feel like we should be able to make the cuts to make our budgets balance, and I am optimistic that as my income goes up (when I can work more as child 3 starts school) that we will be able to make overpayments.

    My plan for now is:
    1) Try to wiggle those budget numbers around enough that we don't have a shortfall any more.
    2) Make a plan for any months where I make extra - do I use it for an emergency fund, as a fund to cover future months' shortfalls, to throw money at the debt to try to reduce minimum payments in case of future 'shortfall' months?
    3) Try to make more money. Not quite sure how this will work as I am largely limited to working around DH's working hours (I work evenings and weekends and the 5hrs childcare per week we are paying for for child 3).

    Now that's all down in black and white I am feeling a combination of relieved (to be clear on the numbers) and immensely stressed (by the semi-regular £180+ shortfall).

    Onwards and downwards (for the debt, not me)!

    edited to add: the original £67,031.92 figure was based on the total figure for the Tesco loan, which included all interest payable over the entire term of the loan. I have updated the debt figure in my signature and in all posts going forward as at 4th June 2017 to reflect that actual current debt balance rather than the balance plus interest over the lifetime of the loan. This has knocked £7,911.62 off the debt figure, but means that each monthly payment will have the interest for that month deducted from it, so it won't affect the DFD if I don't make overpayments.
    Last edited by Treadingonplaymobil; 04-06-2017 at 2:58 PM.
Page 149
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 12th Apr 18, 9:27 AM
    • 1,767 Posts
    • 18,219 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Oh and another trauma yesterday - made the mistake of measuring the DCs feet. I'll be over here in the corner rocking if you need me, contemplating the purchase of one complete set of school shoes, trainers, weekend shoes, walking boots and wellies (remember the toddler days when all you needed was wellies and one pair of shoes?), plus another pair of wellies and trainers. Urgh.
    £67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017: £38,608 unsecured debt/£20,000 parental loan/£173,282 mortgage = £231,890
    debt on 1st Sept 2018: £12,221.27 unsecured debt/£19,940 parental loan/£191,003.72 mortgage = £223,165
    • XSpender
    • By XSpender 12th Apr 18, 10:00 AM
    • 3,168 Posts
    • 32,674 Thanks
    XSpender
    Oh and another trauma yesterday - made the mistake of measuring the DCs feet. I'll be over here in the corner rocking if you need me, contemplating the purchase of one complete set of school shoes, trainers, weekend shoes, walking boots and wellies (remember the toddler days when all you needed was wellies and one pair of shoes?), plus another pair of wellies and trainers. Urgh.
    Originally posted by Treadingonplaymobil
    I feel your pain with the footwear. After having had to replace all of DS school uniform last month due to a growth spurt and him losing some items, this month he needs new school shoes and trainers. And I only have one child!
    £15,568.83 all at 0% at 16/11/18

    CC 1 £1980 CC2 £12,465.53 Carpets £1055.39 (22 months left) - £15,500.92 Total at 04/12/18

    Small EF 100% Big EF 0% Holiday 0% Garden 0% Carpets SIF Fund £100.47 (2+)
    • wishingthemortgaheaway
    • By wishingthemortgaheaway 12th Apr 18, 10:24 AM
    • 1,770 Posts
    • 9,010 Thanks
    wishingthemortgaheaway
    Oh and another trauma yesterday - made the mistake of measuring the DCs feet. I'll be over here in the corner rocking if you need me, contemplating the purchase of one complete set of school shoes, trainers, weekend shoes, walking boots and wellies (remember the toddler days when all you needed was wellies and one pair of shoes?), plus another pair of wellies and trainers. Urgh.
    Originally posted by Treadingonplaymobil
    Can you:
    Leave the walking boots for a couple of months? Hand me downs? Again or part ex from a walking boots shop)
    Hand me down wellies from one to another (we have a local welly exchange on Facebook, which is another option)
    Trainers & weekend shoes could double
    Up for a while.

    Wish
    The 100 payment countdown (each payment = £400) 2018 Starts at 13/100 o/s £34,750.
    Jan 18 14/100 Feb 15/100 March 18/100 April 19/100 May 20/100 June 21/100 Dec: 28/100
    MFW 2019 Challenge Member #59: 0/£2860
    • museumworker
    • By museumworker 12th Apr 18, 11:00 AM
    • 2,111 Posts
    • 12,520 Thanks
    museumworker
    Oh and another trauma yesterday - made the mistake of measuring the DCs feet. I'll be over here in the corner rocking if you need me, contemplating the purchase of one complete set of school shoes, trainers, weekend shoes, walking boots and wellies (remember the toddler days when all you needed was wellies and one pair of shoes?), plus another pair of wellies and trainers. Urgh.
    Originally posted by Treadingonplaymobil
    We only just started buying two pairs of shoes for DS (5) - one pair of school shoes, and a pair of canvas type trainers to kick round in on the weekend. He also has cheap black pumps for PE at school. Walking boots or wellies are nice to haves, but not essential and he often doesn't want to wear them anyway. We just tell him to stay out of puddles (which he doesn't )
    Mortgage 16/03/2011: £190K 01/01/2017: £107,729.65 01/07/2017: £95,979.89
    OPs 2011-2016 = £45K 2017 OPs = £9250.20
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 12th Apr 18, 12:08 PM
    • 1,767 Posts
    • 18,219 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Unfortunately all shoes necessary. I used to be a one-pair-of-shoes-per-child person!
    - school shoes for obvious reasons!
    - trainers - as they move up through school they need proper trainers not canvas plimsolls, which is what they had in reception and yr1
    - walking boots - we walk a lot, in mud and all sorts, and everyone knows there is nothing worse than cold wet feet on a long walk, and wellies are uncomfortable for long walks.
    - wellies - forest school, camping holidays, messing about by the river, beach on cold days. They get used a lot and, again, wet feet ruin good days.
    - weekend shoes - the only possible compromise, but relies on DC1 bringing home his pe trainers every single week, and having tried it over winter (because walking boots would do in a pinch, but are too hot for everyday wear as the weather warms up) the reality was that they came home about one week in three, and failed to go back for Monday PE half the time too, so it was a complete disaster.

    The full set of shoes is for DC1 - the younger ones get hand me downs where possible, but I find increasingly that shoes are totally trashed before getting handed down, with the occasional exception of walking boots (DC3 has DC2's old ones) and sandals/wetsuit shoes in the summer (have a couple of pairs ready to go).
    £67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017: £38,608 unsecured debt/£20,000 parental loan/£173,282 mortgage = £231,890
    debt on 1st Sept 2018: £12,221.27 unsecured debt/£19,940 parental loan/£191,003.72 mortgage = £223,165
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 12th Apr 18, 12:40 PM
    • 1,089 Posts
    • 5,948 Thanks
    Onebrokelady
    Thank god for Percy pigs I say
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = £17,630 Paid To Date = £1,519 Total Now Owed = £16,111
    Emergency Fund = £300 Xmas savings = £190
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 12th Apr 18, 6:42 PM
    • 2,236 Posts
    • 22,950 Thanks
    Suffolk lass
    We have our commuting car at the main dealership today. It went to the friendly reliable garage that is local (cheaper by 50%) and preferred (while we were away at Easter) but their replacement of engine coils has not cured the problem. It has just been fed back that there is a suspected fuel contamination issue causing loss of power on hills and the car re-setting itself into "limp mode". This is apparently self-protect mode when there is a problem. Their laptop diagnosis tool on a test run says it is intermittent mis-firing.

    So tomorrow they will remove the full tank of fuel, look to see if it is tank-cleaner, water or diesel in the tank, then flush the fuel tank, replace with proper unleaded 4* and charge us £360 for the privilege. DH is adamant he did not fill it up with diesel. I suppose the look at what they get our will tell us. Bang goes the reserve I was building up for hols.

    I mention this because there have been a number of instances of supermarkets over-egging the tank-cleaner (causing subsequent fuel contamination), water in tanks (not cleaned or sealed, apparently, so it builds up) and replacing diesel with 4* unleaded (the diesel sinks and is then dispensed, causing our symptoms, if the level in the forecourt tank drops).

    You might have something similar. I put a tank of BP Ultimate in mine once in a while if I think there is a build-up of rubbish - it is like Calgon for the diesel engine equivalent of limescale and seems to work for de-fragging it
    MFiT T4 #2 update 90.89% after Q11 against revised stretch target of £60k balance
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 108.06% £12,967.42/£12,000 (after upping my target from £10k to £12k in October)
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £2,410.06/£3,000 including stores 80.34% of my annual budget at the start of Dec.
    My DFD is here
    • fraserbooks
    • By fraserbooks 12th Apr 18, 7:59 PM
    • 319 Posts
    • 5,638 Thanks
    fraserbooks
    I feel for you with shoes. One of my boys ended up an adult size 14 so you can guess how many pairs of shoes I had to buy. I also had to buy football boots and hockey boots as he was quite sporty.
    • JoJoC
    • By JoJoC 12th Apr 18, 8:17 PM
    • 1,128 Posts
    • 6,921 Thanks
    JoJoC
    I alao feel your pain on the shoes front - both mine need new trainers as they have both grown but i need to check the welly boot and school shoes situation. Im hoping the school shoes can limp through to summer...come on, only 2.5 months to go!

    I have a sneaky suspicion my eldest has outgrown his school trousers too as he's shot up recently and a lot of his jeans are too short. Will need to do an assessment then weep at the costs.
    CC1: £4481.14/ £5031.14 (12% paid off, £600) | CC2:£3307/ £3807 (14.4% paid off, £550) | Loan: £10,528.20/ £15,792.30((33% paid off, £5,264))

    July debt total: £24,630.44 | New debt total: £18,316.34 | Total debt paid: £6,414.10 (26%)
    *My debt busting and savings diary*
    • db2016
    • By db2016 12th Apr 18, 8:54 PM
    • 82 Posts
    • 221 Thanks
    db2016
    a note on some car related issues i've read.

    sometimes the AA and RAC etc wont cover older cars or theres surcharges, as simply costs them too much to service, and also train staff, because any car after 2000 say, you more often than not use a computer to diagnose, the days of sucking teeth under the bonnet are long gone, the car tells the human whats wrong now, as someone mentioned the limp mode, this is the car protecting itself.
    my dad has 2 cars, a daily 10 year old car (sporty model), and a 31 year old classic ford, they charge an uplift beacause of this, but hes used them once in past couple of years and it paid for itself as it needed to be lifted off the ground and on a flatbed truck and taken to a specalist in midlands, when we are NE. aside from that, USUALLY in car circles cars as classed as classics after 15 years, including insurance etc. this doesnt mean they have to be a sporty car or such, just over that age, so anyone out there with a car this age, it may be worth looking for classic insurers, no matter if you think its special or not!

    fuel prices, try petrol prices uk, and once you find good price, only fill up half way or less, fuel weighs more than 1kg a litre so you may only notice a small improvement but why lug around excess weight?!

    using a good fuel also helps, especially for older cars, but i'd not use it if your only going to use once a while, its complex but the different RON ratings of fuels being mixed can introduce problems too (eg unleaded here is usually 95-97, super unleaded is near 98-100), it may hiccup etc.

    there are also proper cleaning methods such as terraclean which is a total flush of system with a cleaner, i dont know prices but a lot of car groups i'm in (you may have guessed i'm a car guy ha), swear by it. and claim improved fuel economy and generally better running. its kinda like cleaning the arteries of the engine. more furr'ed up they are the less efficient it will move the fuel around.
    • arsenalbarnie
    • By arsenalbarnie 13th Apr 18, 9:58 AM
    • 275 Posts
    • 1,766 Thanks
    arsenalbarnie
    Do you have an outlet centre near you for shoes? I remember when my eldest two were in year 7&8 I took the 5 of mine to Swindon Outlet centre for the day. We bought shoes x 5, trainers or similar x 5, rugby boots x 2 and I can't remember the other 3 but we had 15 pairs! Saved me loads. I remember them all hanging on DD's pushchair When we got home a magpie had fallen down the chimney and had been trapped in our living room all afternoon oh Gawd you should have seen the state of the room. Purple bird sh*t everywhere where it had been eating mulberries. We were all too chicken to go in there apart from DS2 who crept in and opened the patio doors to let it fly out.

    I feel your pain with shoe buying. It is so frustrating trying to build up savings pots. I am trying but feel like I need to save for a year then start. It is so difficult.
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 13th Apr 18, 1:07 PM
    • 1,767 Posts
    • 18,219 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Just popping in to say hello! The last 24 hours have been entirely occupied with the total nightmare of our architect. Instead of developing the design proposals as agreed, he has produced a completely new set of proposals which bear little resemblance to our original design brief. Am so raging, and have just sent a long email explaining that (a) he's not designing what he said he would and (b) we won't be paying for the designs he's produced thus far because of that. Arghhhhh
    £67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017: £38,608 unsecured debt/£20,000 parental loan/£173,282 mortgage = £231,890
    debt on 1st Sept 2018: £12,221.27 unsecured debt/£19,940 parental loan/£191,003.72 mortgage = £223,165
    • Verbatim
    • By Verbatim 13th Apr 18, 4:57 PM
    • 4,629 Posts
    • 14,001 Thanks
    Verbatim
    Takes me back to a similar situation with an architect we had. A"design led" practice which appeared to mean they wanted to win awards and our lot was to let them build what they thought might win (and pay) not what we asked for. So we wanted a kitchen extension which would allow us to cook and eat in the same room so guests and we could chat while food was cooked. They came back with a wall between the two areas with a clerestory at the top, ie 8 or 10 feet up.
    CCs @0% £24k Dec 05 £19,621.41 Au £13400 S 12600 Oct £11,981 £9481 £7500 Nov £7250 D £7100 Jan 6950 F £5800 Mar£5400 May £4830 June £4660 July £4460 Aug £3200, S £900, £0 18/9/07 DFW Nerd 042
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 14th Apr 18, 6:06 AM
    • 1,767 Posts
    • 18,219 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Week 61: Day 6

    Morning. Needing All The Coffee this morning (and I don't even drink coffee). Had awful insomnia last night after architect stress (on which more in a moment), dozed off at midnight, then had a DC up every 30-45 minutes for the rest of the night. One with (I think) growing pains, one kept throwing off the duvet then getting cold, one having nightmares. Have given up now and am nursing a mug of tea while they all snooze away contentedly, naturally. Only need to drive for 45 minutes this morning to pick up DH, then can snooze in the car all the way to London.

    Right, architect. I sent a really really challenging email, saying we were feeling really disappointed with the work done so far, he hadn't answered the brief at all, we weren't planning to pay for the design work so far as it ignored the brief so mightily, he had offered no explanation for abandoning various design avenues which we had specifically asked him to follow. I spent the rest of the day in huge tension - I hate being confrontational and negative to such an extent, and I was worried we had missed something or failed to tell him something somewhere along the line which had led to this state. He finally emailed back about 8pm with a somewhat patronising email suggesting we didn't understand the design process (which seems to be a process where you design a house for five people with room for only four beds an one toilet ), but attached one more design sketch... which was an absolute work of genius. Perfect proportions, answered every single issue we had presented, made the space look good, just exactly what we wanted. I can only assume that (because our space is very challenging, being so small) he just hadn't spent the time on it before, and following our ranty email he spent the day working on it to produce the design he sent. Honestly, it flows so well compared to the others, and includes all of the few non-negotiables, rather than just one or two (four bedrooms, boot room type space, utility room, extra light into downstairs back half of the house, bathroom upstairs if humanly possible). Of course, now we have to figure out how much square footage it is and whether we can (a) get planning and (b) afford it, but I finally feel like we're working with designs which are going in the direction we want.

    Other than that, have had a nice couple of days at my mother's! Looking forward to seeing other relatives in London later on. But mostly to sleeping in the car.

    Have spent no money since being here other than a couple of quid on snacks for the car journey, and will need to top up fuel at some stage.

    Debt repayment:
    - £29.15/30 April rounding down pot. Ooh look, almost reached my April goal already!
    - £1,922.49/£5,000 2018 debt repayment goal.
    £67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017: £38,608 unsecured debt/£20,000 parental loan/£173,282 mortgage = £231,890
    debt on 1st Sept 2018: £12,221.27 unsecured debt/£19,940 parental loan/£191,003.72 mortgage = £223,165
    • Treadingonplaymobil
    • By Treadingonplaymobil 14th Apr 18, 6:17 AM
    • 1,767 Posts
    • 18,219 Thanks
    Treadingonplaymobil
    Takes me back to a similar situation with an architect we had. A"design led" practice which appeared to mean they wanted to win awards and our lot was to let them build what they thought might win (and pay) not what we asked for. So we wanted a kitchen extension which would allow us to cook and eat in the same room so guests and we could chat while food was cooked. They came back with a wall between the two areas with a clerestory at the top, ie 8 or 10 feet up.
    Originally posted by Verbatim
    OMG you are heaven sent! I have been trying to remember the word for glass bits at the top as we want to include them in one of the rooms and hallway to get extra light in (if budget allows, which it probably won't). Kept googling to no avail and I knew there was a name for them. MSE solves all problems, it's official.
    £67,031.92 is a frightening number indeed... The debt free diary of one family and their enormous debt
    LBM debt on 12th Feb 2017: £38,608 unsecured debt/£20,000 parental loan/£173,282 mortgage = £231,890
    debt on 1st Sept 2018: £12,221.27 unsecured debt/£19,940 parental loan/£191,003.72 mortgage = £223,165
    • Verbatim
    • By Verbatim 14th Apr 18, 7:35 AM
    • 4,629 Posts
    • 14,001 Thanks
    Verbatim
    OMG you are heaven sent! I have been trying to remember the word for glass bits at the top as we want to include them in one of the rooms and hallway to get extra light in (if budget allows, which it probably won't). Kept googling to no avail and I knew there was a name for them. MSE solves all problems, it's official.
    Originally posted by Treadingonplaymobil
    Glad to be of service!
    CCs @0% £24k Dec 05 £19,621.41 Au £13400 S 12600 Oct £11,981 £9481 £7500 Nov £7250 D £7100 Jan 6950 F £5800 Mar£5400 May £4830 June £4660 July £4460 Aug £3200, S £900, £0 18/9/07 DFW Nerd 042
    • mfmaybe
    • By mfmaybe 14th Apr 18, 7:40 AM
    • 1,158 Posts
    • 3,770 Thanks
    mfmaybe
    There's also a transom window which I think is only when above a door. I really like them, and wish there was a place for one in our new house!

    We did have similar architect issues, and these were basically only resolved when I sent them a measured out floor plan and said "draw this". Which rather misses the point of an architect. It's good that they came through with a plan you love; but keep in mind part of the brief to them (the biggest part, really) has to be budget, and they have to design something that you can afford to build. Which rooms will be affected - kitchens and bathrooms? If so then you need to ask what sort of spec he's assuming in budget, too. These are the most expensive rooms but can also be the area where huge savings could be made. We fitted out a bathroom 2 years ago with less than £1k of stuff including a rainshower, etc, and there wasn't a single thing I wish we'd spent more money on. Whereas most self build magazines reckon £4k per bathroom. Our new build will have an IKEA kitchen, not a £40k bespoke number etc. It's much harder to save money on basic walls!

    Sorry for the ramble, am fully in building mode these days.
    0% card was £1126.91 / Now £1669.11

    AFD June 8/15 NSD June 5/11

    Other debts paid since 1/1/14: £17,005
    • Sea Shell
    • By Sea Shell 14th Apr 18, 8:02 AM
    • 1,056 Posts
    • 1,688 Thanks
    Sea Shell
    How much have you got in your "extension" pot at the mo? How are you funding the majority of the works? Did you get extra on your Re-mortgage towards this?

    (sorry if you've already posted this info earlier....it is now a rather large thread!!)
    " That pound I saved yesterday, is a pound I don't have to earn tomorrow "
  • archived user
    Hi ToP! New subscriber here, currently catching up (I'm on page 25 ) but just wanted to say your hard work & determination is so inspiring You've given me some ideas to clear my debt! So thanks. Back to catching up...
    • Cherryfudge
    • By Cherryfudge 14th Apr 18, 10:06 AM
    • 2,198 Posts
    • 12,983 Thanks
    Cherryfudge
    I did feel for you, reading all your stresses of yesterday but... result! How wonderful to know it can be done. I know there are still the 'little' matters of planning permission and money but a specific plan is such a boost to keep you on track when the going gets tough.

    Hope you have a nice restful time now that nasty bit is done and dusted (and yes, it does sound as though he'd spent all day working on it).
    MFW #30 Paid off £3,942.07/£3000 as of 3/12/18
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

846Posts Today

6,287Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • One would hope if there were a people's vote, this time we'd have a properly constructed vote, that gave the public? https://t.co/9e5WT51CQz

  • I'm getting really confused by people feeling the urgent need to respond to my tweets that all say "this poll isn't? https://t.co/046hq4kZl4

  • I've written, published and broadcast on this scores of times. Maybe the easiest explanation is within this? https://t.co/W1MufNrpjS

  • Follow Martin