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    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 28th Jan 17, 12:18 PM
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    Suffolk lass
    Get a grip woman!
    • #1
    • 28th Jan 17, 12:18 PM
    Get a grip woman! 28th Jan 17 at 12:18 PM
    Having been reading a number of people's debt-free wannabe diaries for some time now, I have finally decided I will start my own.

    We are less than three years from wanting to stop work, and less than ten years from state retirement age. I manage our household finances and DH lets me get on with it. His attitude is more "live for today" so we are a good balance, I think. We have two holidays each year and sometimes more - and he has some boys toys - 2 Harley Davidson motorcycles in the garage, that seem to always need money spending on them. That said, there is more to be said in favour of a happy and contented DH than against them so I don't resent them in any way.

    So to debts - It seems a good time because I have recently finished the finance on my car, and as of yesterday, paid off the finance for DS's car (I borrowed from him 18 months ago and paid back by buying his car on finance and paying his insurance). I was paying 4.7% on that debt so it was my highest priority. I paid it off 10 months early using most of my HSBC Regular Saver that matured this week.

    The debts I have currently are:

    £110,621 - Mortgage - interest rate of 0.74% (0.5 above the BoEBR)
    £3,476 - DH's car - 0% credit card until Sept 17 - a £4000 cash advance with a £76 fee
    £8,755.54 - Barclays Finance for double glazing 0% over 2 years 2/24 paid

    Total £122,852.54

    It isn't that I can't afford to keep up payments, it is more that I want us to start our non-work phase without them hanging over us, if you know what I mean.

    I think that will do for a scene setter.

    SL
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
Page 16
    • redofromstart
    • By redofromstart 2nd Mar 18, 10:19 AM
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    redofromstart
    Ouch, that is painful for the lenses.
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 2nd Mar 18, 10:23 AM
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    enthusiasticsaver
    That is a nice big chunk off the mortgage. Any decision on when you and DH are retiring?
    Debt free and mortgage free and early retiree. Living the dream

    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Mortgages and Endowments, Banking and Budgeting boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Any views are mine and not the official line of moneysavingexpert.com. Pease remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 3rd Mar 18, 7:55 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    I dream of being where you are
    Originally posted by boxofpaws
    Aww Paws, you will get there. You have the tools in your armoury and you are making great progress. The difference is that we are charging towards the end of our working lives and you are in the middle of yours. I really think you are better placed than us - you have time to go for FIRE (Financial Independence & Retire Early) if you keep going!
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 3rd Mar 18, 8:03 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    Ouch, that is painful for the lenses.
    Originally posted by redofromstart
    I know, in layman's terms (my terms) I've had double cataract surgery (thanks to 25 years of intermittent high-dosage steroids to treat underlying lung problems) and my eyes have kept changing. The surgeon didn't expect my eyes to get worse in terms of how I see, not the cataracts, but they did, which means the stigmatism is cornea distortion, rather than lens (it would be - nothing is ever straightforward in this household!) - and they are still changing. Whatever they say, I have not got used to the side effects and can still see the edge of one lens all the time.

    The artificial lens they inserted is also going to need a follow-up procedure but I have asked to wait for that.

    At least I can safely drive. I might have left things but for the way my work relies on a Surface Pro as my on-the-move device. I kind of need to be able to see the small screen so have made the decision to keep a pair for my PC, some sunglasses and one pair of varifocals with the up-to-date prescription, and not do the other two pairs at the moment.
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 3rd Mar 18, 8:09 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    That is a nice big chunk off the mortgage. Any decision on when you and DH are retiring?
    Originally posted by enthusiasticsaver
    I think it will be around Christmas for me. It is actually about not exposing myself to lurgy next winter on the commute as much as anything else. I don't want to sound frail or fragile but every chest infection I get ends up with pleurisy and sometimes pneumonia and that is not good. So not sitting opposite men (it is really, honestly, always men) sneezing snorting and spluttering with no handkerchief or tissues can only be good (on oh so many levels).

    DH will make the next academic year his last and end his FT role in July 2019 (September 1st so he gets paid for the holidays - why wouldn't you?). He might do a bit of local supply work to top up his spending money but will "retire" then, two months before he is 61
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 3rd Mar 18, 10:01 AM
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    Karmacat
    SL, I'm really pleased for you with those retirement dates, and totally with you on the not exposing yourself to winter lurgies on transport. But omigod, the lenses issue! That's a lot to deal with, as well as the underlying lung issues you're obviously just Getting On With.
    Retired August 2016
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 3rd Mar 18, 10:51 AM
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    enthusiasticsaver
    I think that is sensible. I have to say that since I retired the only lurgy I seem to have caught is off my DGD or a New Years Eve celebration. Not commuting has made such a difference to my mood and health. If you have chest problems then I am sure retiring before the harsh winter next year would be beneficial. Will you have to carry on taking the mortgage into retirement or will you be able to clear it using S and S ISAs and a PCLS from your pension? Nice to have a date in mind.
    Debt free and mortgage free and early retiree. Living the dream

    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Mortgages and Endowments, Banking and Budgeting boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Any views are mine and not the official line of moneysavingexpert.com. Pease remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 10th Mar 18, 7:09 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    Took delivery of my glasses, complete with the new lenses yesterday. Also had my annual asthma check, BP, heart rate and weighed. All were better than last year. My resting heart rate was only 60 - normally 64-68 but maybe the half hour wait in the Dr's waiting room meant I had slowed to a halt!

    Anyway, I must remember to remind myself to set the appointment before the repeat prescriptions get blocked next year.

    DH will be shopping for us today (so this will keep our spends minimal) as I will be part of a small working party helping one of our local residents to get her house habitable. She lives alone and has a few health issues. None of us realised it was all going wrong behind her front door until she asked her neighbour for help to get her fire lit (she had no heating!) and after going in there he asked me to help - there are now six of us. Just for a couple of hours at this stage while my DH takes her shopping. Her Son is coming to go through paperwork. There is a sense of relief and embarrassment for the poor lady concerned.
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • boxofpaws
    • By boxofpaws 10th Mar 18, 7:17 AM
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    boxofpaws
    So not sitting opposite men (it is really, honestly, always men) sneezing snorting and spluttering with no handkerchief or tissues can only be good (on oh so many levels).
    Originally posted by Suffolk lass
    Seriously, there is nothing like traveling on public transport to remind you how truly disgusting some humans can be. GET A TISSUE

    Took delivery of my glasses, complete with the new lenses yesterday. Also had my annual asthma check, BP, heart rate and weighed. All were better than last year. My resting heart rate was only 60 - normally 64-68 but maybe the half hour wait in the Dr's waiting room meant I had slowed to a halt!

    Anyway, I must remember to remind myself to set the appointment before the repeat prescriptions get blocked next year.

    DH will be shopping for us today (so this will keep our spends minimal) as I will be part of a small working party helping one of our local residents to get her house habitable. She lives alone and has a few health issues. None of us realised it was all going wrong behind her front door until she asked her neighbour for help to get her fire lit (she had no heating!) and after going in there he asked me to help - there are now six of us. Just for a couple of hours at this stage while my DH takes her shopping. Her Son is coming to go through paperwork. There is a sense of relief and embarrassment for the poor lady concerned.
    Originally posted by Suffolk lass
    60 is a great resting heart rate, well done.

    How lovely of you to help your neighbour like this. I’m sure you’ll make such a difference to her. You really are a good egg
    Debt 03/01/17 = £42000
    Debt today = £27,819.22
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 10th Mar 18, 8:45 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    Thanks Paws. Not really. Just part of living in a Village. I feel I should have noticed earlier.

    Re the Men on public transport thing, I used to hand out tissues, e.g.

    "Here, have a tissue!"
    "No, it's all right"
    "No, really, it really isn't all right. I insist!" (thrusts tissue into their hand like their Mother in absentia)
    (grudgingly takes it).

    I have also been known to look pointedly at their trouser leg where, in full view of the carriage they think they secretly wiped the snot off their hand. Or worse still, the seat....

    Oh dear, I may have turned into Hyacinth Bouquet...
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 10th Mar 18, 10:33 AM
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    Karmacat
    Yikes to the guys on public transport. I have to say, when I use trains or buses, I take account of where other people are sitting, so no one can do that to me .... oops.

    And it *is* lovely of you (all of you!) to help your neighbour. There are few places where that would happen. Lots of good karma there for all concerned, including the lady who needs the help.
    Retired August 2016
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 16th Mar 18, 6:03 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    I think that is sensible. I have to say that since I retired the only lurgy I seem to have caught is off my DGD or a New Years Eve celebration. Not commuting has made such a difference to my mood and health. If you have chest problems then I am sure retiring before the harsh winter next year would be beneficial. Will you have to carry on taking the mortgage into retirement or will you be able to clear it using S and S ISAs and a PCLS from your pension? Nice to have a date in mind.
    Originally posted by enthusiasticsaver
    I did not answer the retirement questions. I suspect we will take ours into our non-working phase unless interest rates start to really increase. We will have an "on-paper" surplus allowing us to do so and I suppose that the cash-flow might also be a driver.

    Having seen our Council Tax bill this week (£17 pm increase and now over £2000 over ten months), we will have to keep an eye on bills and inflation.

    If all goes well we will wait until April 20 to draw down a third of DH's DC pension and do the same for each of the following two tax years (his pension means that he will get about £3k of it tax-free). We could use his DB lump-sum in September 2019 to reduce it by nearly £20k to do it a bit earlier, or use all of mine (well most) and clear the lot when I stop work. I suppose that is a mental resistance thing. I want to have that sitting behind us.
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 16th Mar 18, 6:09 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    In other news, the lenses have been put on the CC along with my season ticket up until mid April (over £600) so once again, well over £1200 on the CC next month.

    At least it explains why I have £40 in JL vouchers this time!

    Going to try and keep our SM shopping to a minimum and keep the freezer and fridge reductions going. Used a turkey pie this week. And made a yummy old-fashioned rice pudding with two surplus pints of milk. Got a week-old cauliflower to do for tonight. And still the two frozen cod fillets look at me from the top drawer of the freezer!

    We are out on Sunday for my birthday - not sure how many but will be a few of us, I think
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 16th Mar 18, 8:53 AM
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    enthusiasticsaver
    Our council tax has gone up by 6.1% so now just over £1800 a year. Am considering moving to 12 months rather than 10 as we are now on a lower monthly income.
    Debt free and mortgage free and early retiree. Living the dream

    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Mortgages and Endowments, Banking and Budgeting boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Any views are mine and not the official line of moneysavingexpert.com. Pease remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 16th Mar 18, 4:29 PM
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    Karmacat
    Council tax is my biggest bill by far Mine is over £1k, and even that is with the 25% single occupancy discount

    I'm sure reducing what's in the freezer a bit is a good thing - I see a *lot* of people with a *lot* of money tied up in the food thats there, and its not used - its kept "in case".... mine is full of frozen veg thats constantly being used up, and nuts and seeds kept in there to stop rancidity .... they may have been in there too long, my own version of too much money in the freezer
    Retired August 2016
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 17th Mar 18, 7:31 AM
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    Suffolk lass
    Ooh, nuts and seeds in the freezer. There's never room in mine. I made three large (baking sheet-sized) shallow chicken and pea pies with the left-over chicken from the Sunday lunch I co-ordinated for the (Church) fund-raiser two weeks ago and had to practice my best tetris skills to fit them in. It does mean there is a really quick community lunch option available with a couple of bags of salad if we are short of a volunteer for any month.

    There is also a Turkey Crown and large Pork Shoulder in there that are coming on holiday with us this year (makes them sound like friends ) - they were bought when on offer for the big S/C house in Scotland for 12 of us over Easter. So not all my housekeeping in there.

    I take your point about paying the shops to store their stuff in my freezers though! Quite a lot of mine is meat bought on offer and veg and fruit I grew. It is this stuff we must use, together with mystery surprise left-overs that each time I pop them in I reassure myself I will know what they are - and each time I take them out I can't remember or identify because they are frozen!!
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • boxofpaws
    • By boxofpaws 17th Mar 18, 7:45 AM
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    boxofpaws
    I'm always a little scared of the stuff in the freezer, especially anything I've put in a tub. In the past, I have been known the defrost it and then let it go off and then throw it out. I never think meat tastes ok being cooked after it's been frozen, (I always manage to make is stringy), so I'm gradually getting rid of all things like that and sticking with storing safe stuff like chips and fishfingers.

    Stuff that is not frightening in any way
    Debt 03/01/17 = £42000
    Debt today = £27,819.22
    • Cherryfudge
    • By Cherryfudge 17th Mar 18, 2:11 PM
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    Cherryfudge
    There is also a Turkey Crown and large Pork Shoulder in there that are coming on holiday with us this year (makes them sound like friends )
    Originally posted by Suffolk lass
    I'm always a little scared of the stuff in the freezer, especially anything I've put in a tub. In the past, I have been known the defrost it and then let it go off and then throw it out. I never think meat tastes ok being cooked after it's been frozen, (I always manage to make is stringy), so I'm gradually getting rid of all things like that and sticking with storing safe stuff like chips and fishfingers.

    Stuff that is not frightening in any way
    I'm not the only one to have a questionable relatonship with my freezer, then?!
    MFW #30 Paid off £1,622.77/£3770 as of 4/5/18
    • Suffolk lass
    • By Suffolk lass 23rd Mar 18, 3:39 PM
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    Suffolk lass
    Well, for the first time in ages, I am making bread. It seems awfully sticky. I do hope I haven't mis-remembered the recipe!
    MFiT T4 #2 update 88.72% after Q9 tiny bit ahead of where I should be
    Save £12k in 2018 #53 - after May 45.81% £4,581.38/£10,000
    OS Grocery Challenge 2018 spent £1,021.80/£3,000 including stores so far 34.06% of my annual budget at the end of May
    My DFD is here
    • redofromstart
    • By redofromstart 23rd Mar 18, 4:00 PM
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    redofromstart
    Sticky is usually better, as long as it is workable. HTH
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