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    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 31st Dec 16, 4:05 AM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    From debt to freedom...
    • #1
    • 31st Dec 16, 4:05 AM
    From debt to freedom... 31st Dec 16 at 4:05 AM
    For a couple of months I have been lurking and reading diaries which have been helpful and inspiring. I thought that I would start a diary to keep myself focussed on getting rid of the debts.

    I am a working mum, recently separated from my husband. I have a large family which makes for an interesting and busy life! I have had a couple of LBMs in recent years and tried to stick to a budget. I had 2 loans totalling 17, 000 at one point. One loan was paid in Aug 2016 and the 2nd has just over £2,000 to go and is due to be paid off by August 2017.
    Other than that, I have a cc with a £475 balance, 2 home improvement loans ( for double glazing) that both have about £1700 outstanding. These have a horrible interest rate of 22%, so I'm eager to tackle these first.
Page 21
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 2nd Jan 18, 11:00 AM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    I've paid the last council tax instalment for this financial year...always a good feeling and even better to know that in February and March I can focus that amount of money onto a debt.

    I've also made an extra payment of £30 to the cc so making small steps. My cc is an online account which I've never done before. It's quite odd not having paper statements and making sure I log in to read the information. Went on today and actually discovered where the statements were so I read them, then wrote down a list in a notebook, so that I can see where I have spent on the card, then tick it off when I have repaid it, if that makes sense. I marvel at people who can manage everything online!

    Pleased at how the food is lasting at the moment. I thought the Christmas cake wouldn't make it to the New a Year but we still have a fair bit left. I'll probably need to top up on milk today but ok for everything else.
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 2nd Jan 18, 9:35 PM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    Not a NSD as I had to top up on milk and get DS2 sorted out with football boots. My lovely parents have offered to pay for the boots as part of his Christmas presents.

    I have to confess that I saw and bought some boots marked down in a sale. They have memory foam in the sole and feel quite sculpted inside. I'd seen them back in September and thought they would be ideal for work as I'm on my feet for most of the day. Will move money around to cover the cost, but with 30% off it seemed a good bargain.

    I made 2 different soups for tea tonight -lentil and bacon and carrot & coriander. I'd forgotten how filling homemade soup can be! Especially warming on a stormy night like tonight!
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Cherryfudge
    • By Cherryfudge 3rd Jan 18, 12:48 AM
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    Cherryfudge
    I made 2 different soups for tea tonight -lentil and bacon and carrot & coriander. I'd forgotten how filling homemade soup can be! Especially warming on a stormy night like tonight!
    Originally posted by Honeysucklelou2
    Yummy! I love soup with lentils in particular.

    The boots sound too good to miss, especially with being on your feet so much. I generally wear running shoes at work (that sort of job) because they are so light and soft. It takes the ache out of hard floors! Not nearly as elegant as boots, of course.
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 3rd Jan 18, 11:45 PM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    Looking forward to wearing the boots tomorrow when I go back to work. I'm hoping we can all adjust quickly to the early mornings.

    NSD #2 today
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 4th Jan 18, 8:54 PM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    Boots were amazingly warm and comfortable. Definitely worth the £35 spend! We managed to get up and out the door this morning...hurray! I thought I was doing well, having remembered my homemade lentil and bacon soup and the saucepan with which to heat it only to realise halfway to work that I had forgotten to put the meat in the slow cooker for stew! Thankfully DD1 was at home to rescue the situation.

    Tomorrow is her last day before going back to university. I'll miss her.
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • louby40
    • By louby40 4th Jan 18, 9:04 PM
    • 1,363 Posts
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    louby40
    I made leek and potato soup on Tuesday and we had it with crusty rolls. I never buy tinned soup - it!!!8217;s much nicer when it!!!8217;s homemade.

    Glad your first day back to work went ok. It!!!8217;s definitely a shock to the system but I must admit I do like the routine - and more controlled eating lol!
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 4th Jan 18, 10:05 PM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    Very true Louby on both counts! It is amazing how one's body gets used to breakfast at 7, lunch at 12.30 and evening meal at 6 ish.
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 7th Jan 18, 6:43 AM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    Busy day yesterday as I took DD1 back to uni. I managed to change a
    Headlight bulb before setting off which I was pleased about. I'd bought the spare last week and looked up online to check how to do the job. Iam trying to do simple car maintenance jobs myself.

    I'm thankful for a safe journey there and back. It is doable in a day but makes it a long day of driving. We called into the supermarket and I bought some food to start her off this term. DD4 was sad to say goodbye. Don't know if I'll be able to visit at half term yet but will try if possible. On Friday evening we spent time making lasagne and portioning it between silver foil trays so that they could be frozen as a ready meal.

    This week needs to be a frugal week, as 2 lots of groceries and the diesel for yesterday , although budgeted for, have made a dent in the bank balance. DD2 made some flapjacks and banana bread while I was away yesterday so hopefully I'll just need to make the pasties for tea.
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Storm89
    • By Storm89 7th Jan 18, 7:02 AM
    • 517 Posts
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    Storm89
    just popping in to say hi, hope your daughter has gone back off to uni ok. when is she back? I agree the boots were a good buy you'd have regretted it I'm sure
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 8th Jan 18, 12:38 AM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    Hi Storm, thanks for popping by

    NSD #3 for me today (Sun), a relief after spending so much on Saturday! The pasties went down a treat. I came to the conclusion that while I'm happy to use Stork for cake making, I will go back to butter for pastry. I used Stork last time and had a complete disaster with the pasties. This time I went back to using butter and the pastry was much more pliable and easier to crimp and didn't fall apart when cooking...in other words it was a proper pasty!

    I've got 4 loads of washing done today but have had to (reluctantly ) use the tumble dryer. In the last gales I had a little bit of washing on the line and the rotary dryer somehow bent and the pole snapped off at ground level. I have been trying to dry clothes on an airer but the volume of washing is too great and results in a backlog of damp clothes if I'm not careful. At least a few loads are washed and dried which is good.
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Mumoffourkids
    • By Mumoffourkids 8th Jan 18, 6:21 AM
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    Mumoffourkids
    There is no way I would keep up with the washing if I didn't use the tumble dryer so I am sure your house is probably the same. In the spring and summer I dry on the washing line but there is just too much washing in the winter to not use the tumble dryer.

    Glad dd1 went off to uni ok and your pasties sound lovely. I might make some cakes today while the small ones are napping!
    Total debt Dec 2017 £23090.83
    Ma7 2018 £3691.78 84.01% paid
    Emergency fund £150/£600
    Total Savings £1328.05
    • Storm89
    • By Storm89 8th Jan 18, 9:23 AM
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    Storm89
    You guys are lucky having a tumble dryer - we don't have room for one so everything is on airers or radiators. I usually do my washing Friday through Monday and then ironing is done by the following Friday when it starts again.
    I'm baking a lot too , I used to easily spend a tenner on cakes and chocolate each week. The kids are loving helping too so I feel like we're spending more quality time together alongside saving money. Great that Sunday was a NSD , here's to another frugal week
    • Mumoffourkids
    • By Mumoffourkids 8th Jan 18, 10:15 AM
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    Mumoffourkids
    My tumble dryer and washing machine are out in the garage storm as there isn't room in the house for them. I also have my overflow freezer out there. I sort all the washing out here into whose it is as well. I have some plastic vegetable baskets that are stackable. Each child has a basket and once it is dry, I sort into whose basket it is. Then when the basket is full, the clothes get taken upstairs and put away. It keeps the washing out of he house I suppose and stops me having piles of clothes hanging around!
    Total debt Dec 2017 £23090.83
    Ma7 2018 £3691.78 84.01% paid
    Emergency fund £150/£600
    Total Savings £1328.05
    • Storm89
    • By Storm89 8th Jan 18, 10:21 AM
    • 517 Posts
    • 1,326 Thanks
    Storm89
    That sounds very organised mumoffour. We don't have a garage either just have a parking space so couldn't do that. All these little things are what I think I'd like when moving house. Having clothes hanging around the house is annoying.I like the idea of an overflow freezer too . I suppose you have to run the house so organised with having a big family.
    • Mumoffourkids
    • By Mumoffourkids 8th Jan 18, 10:33 AM
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    Mumoffourkids
    Yep it's good having a garage but in the fact that it is generally filled with carp! Also you can't get to it from inside the house, you have to go outside. And yes I have to be very organised although I do hate sorting clothes out! I often get it wrong whose clothes are whose!
    Total debt Dec 2017 £23090.83
    Ma7 2018 £3691.78 84.01% paid
    Emergency fund £150/£600
    Total Savings £1328.05
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 8th Jan 18, 10:19 PM
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    Honeysucklelou2
    I often end up folding something and having to ask the older DDs whose item of clothing it is.

    You're right Storm, I am lucky to have a tumble dryer. I try hard not to use it because of the cost of running it but the mountains of washing we have make it necessary to use in the depths of winter. That's great that you are enjoying baking with your children. Cooking with children has got to be one of the best things to do!
    Last edited by Honeysucklelou2; 08-01-2018 at 10:21 PM.
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 9th Jan 18, 8:17 PM
    • 883 Posts
    • 3,577 Thanks
    Honeysucklelou2
    Payment to the cc by direct debit happened yesterday so another £25 paid. Every little paid off is going in the right direction.
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 11th Jan 18, 9:41 PM
    • 883 Posts
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    Honeysucklelou2
    NSD #4 today - hurray. I had hoped to have a few more NSDs this week but running low on milk and then DD3 having a cookery lesson at school did away with that hope. I wonder why cookery lessons never seem to need the things that you have readily available at home??!!
    paydbx #93 £692/£8,000.
    Loan £17k - paid off in Aug 2017. Home improvement loans £3342 March 2017. £3123 in Jan 18
    • Cherryfudge
    • By Cherryfudge 11th Jan 18, 10:48 PM
    • 1,757 Posts
    • 9,629 Thanks
    Cherryfudge
    NSD #4 today - hurray. I had hoped to have a few more NSDs this week but running low on milk and then DD3 having a cookery lesson at school did away with that hope. I wonder why cookery lessons never seem to need the things that you have readily available at home??!!
    Originally posted by Honeysucklelou2
    I remember my parents and I frantically trying to decipher the ingredients needed for next day's cookery lesson and I was getting tearful because I would be in trouble for not having the 'lerion' listed in my scruffy handwriting. It was my Dad who finally worked out what it was. I often think of that when I cook with a lemon.
    • Mumoffourkids
    • By Mumoffourkids 12th Jan 18, 6:12 AM
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    Mumoffourkids
    My eldest two’s school you don’t have to provide all the ingredients. Sometimes it is just a couple and sometimes you don’t have to provide anything. I just have to make a contribution of £10 towards ingredients for the year. I think they are trying to stop parents having to buy stuff they wouldn’t necessarily have. So for example, this week my daughter was making savoury rolls but all she had to bring in were whatever savoury bits she wanted. The school provided the ingredients to make the actual rolls. It’s so much easier as all we had to find was bacon and cheese on Sunday night at about 8pm!
    Total debt Dec 2017 £23090.83
    Ma7 2018 £3691.78 84.01% paid
    Emergency fund £150/£600
    Total Savings £1328.05
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