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    • Nargleblast
    • By Nargleblast 11th Aug 18, 3:14 PM
    • 9,146 Posts
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    Nargleblast
    Welcome Petrolhead4, always room for another!
    One life - your life - live it!
    • Cappella
    • By Cappella 11th Aug 18, 5:51 PM
    • 567 Posts
    • 7,617 Thanks
    Cappella
    Welcome everyone

    Petrolhead - it's never to late to start preparing for those nasty emergencies that floor us all from time to time. I spent six weeks housebound three years ago, and was very thankful indeed for a full pantry and freezer And as d-f-v said preps can often furnish unexpectedly needed gifts.

    Cheapskate - good point. Sometimes we need to prioritise what to keep and what to throw in order for our prepping to be most effective.

    I'm shattered, spent the day digging spuds and pulling up broad beans. The ground is lying fallow now but we'll be putting winter brassica in over the next few weeks. We have three sacks of good spuds which will keep well in our dry shed over autumn, but the yield is very poor compared to last year's six sacks
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 12th Aug 18, 4:06 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    If there is likely to be a smaller potato crop because of the dry hot weather it might be a sensible idea to buy in now some large packs (5kg) of pasta, rice and even flour to use as the carb parts of meals because unlike potatoes, rice and pasta will keep for years without deterioration. I think any shortages will show before the colder weather sets in and undoubtedly the price of potato products will be greatly increased even at the chippy! The flour would be useful to make chapatis and flatbreads to go with all sorts of things as well as making the normal bread and baked goods we're used to.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 12th Aug 18, 4:44 PM
    • 12,055 Posts
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    GreyQueen
    I'm going to be planting a lot more potatoes next year on my Plot2, I usually plant 6 kg of seed spuds but I think I will probably plant about 8-10 kg in 2019. A lot of them go to the 'rents, who insist on paying me whatever is the market rate for farm-gate potatoes by the 25 kg sack.


    There seems to be a fair amount of hysteria going on about post-brexit price increases - today's wailing and gnashing of teeth being about cheese and beef. Nil problemo, we produce good quality of both in the UK and the ever-growing vegan cohort leave more available for omnivores like yours truly.


    I was told the following joke (by a complementary health practictioner, no less):


    Q ; How do you tell a vegan?
    A: You don't need to, they'll tell you.

    Ach well, it made me laugh, anyway.


    Oh, and there's an awful lot of meat available on the cloven hoof in the UK in the form of venison and non-native species like muntjak are causing a lot of damage to our woodlands. We could try chowing down on them, it would solve several issues handily.



    GQ - otherwise known as an apex predator, alongside the rest of homo sapiens.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 12th Aug 18, 5:39 PM
    • 29,605 Posts
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    Karmacat
    Great post, GQ


    I'm gathering together lots of small trays for growing microgreens - they'll be put in larger trays, to group them tidily. I'm determined to work on my greens Speaking of which, I'm going to plant some kale seeds *indoors* - I germinated some very old seeds last year, successfully, but they were eaten when they were about two inches high, by slugs going to keep them inside till they're strong
    Retired August 2016
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 12th Aug 18, 6:29 PM
    • 15,148 Posts
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    mardatha
    Already got a load of pasta MrsL, from Costco. I'm another one who is going to plant more tatties next year, mine so far have been delicious.
    • Cappella
    • By Cappella 12th Aug 18, 7:46 PM
    • 567 Posts
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    Cappella
    Another one here who's stocked up on rice and pasta MrsLW
    A word of caution though about storing wholemeal pasta in glass jars on windowsills in full sun during heat waves.
    Not 100% sure quite what went wrong. I usually store dried goods in our cool pantry, but left them out on the kitchen windowsill for several weeks thinking it would be easy to grab them when needed and also see at a glance what needed replenishing from my main store cupboard.
    Anyway I opened an unused jar of penne pasta yesterday and it ended up in our food waste bin. It smelt horrible, rather like rancid flour, and the smell didn't vanish after a few minutes. I tasted a dried piece and spat it out. It was revolting and most definitely off, though well within its use by date, only bought three weeks ago and was fine when I emptied it into the jar.
    White linguine stored next to it was absolutely fine though so I am puzzled. Wonder if it was the wholemeal element perhaps?
    Anyway I've moved all of my jars into the pantry for the moment. May reinstate them as the weather turns cooler.
    • Petrolhead4
    • By Petrolhead4 12th Aug 18, 8:02 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 62 Thanks
    Petrolhead4
    I truly admire everyone's gardening skills - I'm so hopeless. I may not even be able to keep my tinned stuff edible!

    One great tip I've learned from this thread over the last 24 hours, is to not read through the old posts just before bed. All those scenarios fuelled the most alarming set of dreams I've ever had in my life!

    PS. Thanks for the welcomes Capella and Nargleblast
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 12th Aug 18, 8:05 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    Was it egg pasta Capella? it might be that the egg turned in the heat as the sun through the window would have made it very hot indeed. Or because wholewheat has the oils still in it it might be the oil that has gone rancid. I don't much care for the taste of brown pasta even when it's not rancid, it always has a 'tang' to it that makes me shudder. Always annoying when something goes off though isn't it?
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 12th Aug 18, 8:21 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    Petrolhead, the thread isn't Enid Blyton that's for sure but then if any of the scenarios actually happened life wouldn't be Enid Blyton either would it? That's what the prepping thread is for so folks can learn and knowledge is strength, knowledge of old fashioned 'how to's' knowledge of what's safe and isn't to forage for, how to find/make clean water, a fire, a shelter, how to stay safe in a 'situation' , how to have an escape plan if something kicks off where you happen to be, none of these are ever going to make for comfortable bedtime reading but may just save lives if they're ever needed for real. Worth knowing about even if it is a bit scary!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Petrolhead4
    • By Petrolhead4 12th Aug 18, 8:30 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 62 Thanks
    Petrolhead4
    That is so true MrsL! x
    • Cappella
    • By Cappella 12th Aug 18, 8:39 PM
    • 567 Posts
    • 7,617 Thanks
    Cappella
    MrsLW - it wasn't egg pasta, but I did wonder if it was because it was wholewheat, given that wholewheat flour actually has a shorter half life than white. I rarely buy wholewheat pasta but it was on offer so thought we'd try it. Won't be buying it again though.
    And yes, I HATE throwing food away, especially if it's my own fault for storing it properly

    Petrolhead - nightmares aren't nice. I often have them myself so you have my sympathy but this thread is great because it helps to teach you practical sensible ways of dealing with everyday real life nightmares, like suddenly being made redundant, (cash saved, full store cupboard) or not being able to leave the house for 3 months, (full freezer, full pantry) or having your purse stolen and being stranded in a strange town without cash (emergency note or coins stashed about your person).
    Lots of strategies here for dealing with things that could happen to any of us.
    Although of course we DO take the zombie apocalypse threat very seriously
    • thriftwizard
    • By thriftwizard 12th Aug 18, 9:50 PM
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    thriftwizard
    May I also extend a welcome to Nannywindow and Petrolhead4? Please don't have nightmares; in reality, the nightmare would be if something foreseeable came to pass & you weren't ready for it, and had no resources to fall back on. We're not the kind of peppers who stash compo rations, armaments and bivouacs to dash to the woods in the case of a Martian invasion, more the kind of mild eccentric who persists in keeping a well-stocked store cupboard and knowing how to tie a useful knot or preserve a glut of strawberries for later reference! (There's nothing like the taste of real summer strawberries in January... or elderflower champagne, spicy apple butter, or quince marmalade!) And just ask Bob about various forms of lighting or cooking necessities in case of perfectly ordinary power cuts...

    Just knowing that you do have resources - of which, the greatest will always be common sense - helps you keep a calm head and keep that head above water. And those resources don't have to cost a fortune, unlike stockpiling weapons & ammo; snippets of knowledge and practical skills are relatively easy & cheap to acquire. It's amazing how much calmer, happier & better off I've been since building up my storecupboard; if I go down with something, or more likely my 92 y.o. mother goes down with something & I have to go & nurse her for a couple of days, I know there's plenty of food available for those at home & no-one needs to spend their (or more likely, my) last few pennies of hard-earned cash on a bag of chips!
    Angie

    GC Aug 18 - 289.33/400
    Bulk-buy purse '18 145.26/250, pet & livestock food '18 160.45/300

    Money's just a substitute for time & talent...
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 13th Aug 18, 1:59 PM
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    DigForVictory
    There is so much freight to the mere word "Prepper". My grandmothers both had pantries (one had that sort of house, one was that sort of shrewd woman who put some unused space to vigorous use) & my parents both had cupboards & built seats that you could open & retrieve tinned tomatoes, beans or kitchen roll from.
    M'father is an enthusiast of bulk buying & having a fleet of daughters took us with him on his occasional forays. There's nothing like being raised dragging a wagon around Bookers to make Costco seem almost manageable (mind, I'm taller now). M'father, having a handful of cash, managed to never bother with membership. Three loaded wagons at the till, and the staff or manager would run an experienced eye over it all & decide to humour the bloke rather than try to put it all away again!

    So I grew up with storage, used, and the relative peace of mind it brings (although my mother's expression as we lugged box after box in was something of a sight) and while I'm not that devout a prepper, I have a loaded larder. Which is part of my ongoing skirmish to keep three sons fed & out of the sweet & sandwich shops... (Let alone the chippy - who else do I turn to when the chaps have earned a treat?!)

    I'll leave you to picture my delight as eldest hauled a trug of laundry off to line dry, unprompted. (He believes his Keep varies with how much it actually costs to keep him.)
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 13th Aug 18, 2:05 PM
    • 29,605 Posts
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    Karmacat
    Working on the strip of garden at the front - neighbour was eyeing it very discontentedly over the weekent, I don't want to create hassle, and I want to use the space anyway, so I'm digging up as much as I can. Just put an order in to Wickes - 3 huge bags of bark chippings, 3 bags of topsoil, almost as huge. 8 delivery - I'd pay less than that for a taxi from the store to my house, so thats okay. Only trouble is the side gate to the back garden, built less than a year ago, has sagged, and doesn't open any more. Builder has gone out of business - another of those jobs that stay in the background unless you suddenly need it **done** - and it isn't!
    Retired August 2016
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 13th Aug 18, 2:23 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    This is only a question not something I am thinking may happen but if this years crops are so very depleted because of the weather and lack of rain would anyone else consider joining together with neighbouring families to all put in a food item to make a communal meal? would that be something that would build community in times of shortages?
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 13th Aug 18, 2:52 PM
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    DigForVictory
    I'd love to be wrong, but I think society has fragmented a bit too far for that to fly. Where your neighbours were likely your kin, then the womenfolk might collectively assemble a meal - possibly using a saints day or similar festival as a pretext.

    These days it's all much more privacy jealously guarded, shameful furtiveness at the food bank, and worst less knowledge on how to make three potatoes, an onion and assorted herb type greens with a bit of bacon go as far as possible.
    Even in the War, communities made jam together as they got the extra sugar, & (I'm told) raised communal pigs on such scraps as existed but the pig was butchered & then assorted cuts eaten in the individual home. It's really only religious communities that seem to come and cook and eat together these days as as I understand it - and I wouldn't mind being utterly wrong.

    My mother as a GP would grumble at these nuclear families scattering to get work - a simple childhood illness cost her hours of home visits when a competent granny could have looked & soothed & saved her several calls, but these days our beloved competent seniors are often not in a few minutes radius.

    So much depends on the knowledge and confidence of the individual, much of which is both supported & eroded by mobile phones & their unending sources of data! Better a trusted book, or the sheer muscle memory, in difficult times to steer you, so you need not worry about power or a signal but can look around & see what's to hand.
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 13th Aug 18, 3:28 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    I just wondered if we were all hungry and only had one thing each to eat whether putting it all together to make a big stew to feed us all would do anything for bringing us closer together, I guess it would have to be tried to see.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Cappella
    • By Cappella 13th Aug 18, 3:45 PM
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    Cappella
    I don't think it would work here at all MrsLW. The demographic of my area has changed markedly, and the old sense of community has I think vanished. Maybe 10 years ago everyone on our avenue (50 houses) might have joined to make a communal meal; (and some people on the allotment still do that, in that we've had communal barbecues and bonfire celebrations).
    However I doubt if that would happen here now on the avenue. So many of these 1930s terraces are now 'buy to let' and there is, sadly, already conflict between new short term tenants who really don't seem to give a damn about their environment and longer standing property owners who are seeing their properties depreciate in value as a direct result of the mess some people are creating both in their lack of care for the rented houses themselves and in the filth they are dumping in the shared communal gated alleyways.
    A community is created when people share values. This is no longer happening here. When people do not share the same ethics and values even in regard to the simple maintenance of the area they share there can be no community. Here I am seeing at first hand resentment taking the place of tolerance and acceptance. I have no wish to be a prophet of doom, I am not yet as badly affected as some of my neighbours: but I am very concerned that I no longer either know many of the new tenants or and do not even want to get to know some of them. This attitude reflects badly, I feel, on myself as a person, and I do not like the way I am changing.
    I would happily share food, and my cooking skills, equally with those who would share with me. I would always share with family and with friends, but I am less than sanguine about helping to feed some members of the wider community who would offer nothing in return.
    I do agree with DfV who said
    These days it's all much more privacy jealously guarded, shameful furtiveness at the food bank, and worst less knowledge on how to make three potatoes, an onion and assorted herb type greens with a bit of bacon go as far as possible.
    I'm sorry, I must sound like a really nasty human being. Perhaps it is different in smaller well established country communities?
    At which point, berating myself for my lack of tolerance of greedy landlords, wastrels and ne'er do wells I will go and make a pie to take to my lovely neighbour, who has just come out of hospital: and who Is a shining example of the generous person I would really like to be.
    Last edited by Cappella; 13-08-2018 at 4:41 PM.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 13th Aug 18, 4:23 PM
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    mardatha
    It might work up here MrsL. This village only has 2 doz houses in 3 short streets. There is an active WVS and Rural although I am not well/brave/sociable enough to go. A lot of the members are from the outlying farms,
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