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    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 14th May 18, 4:34 PM
    • 29,763 Posts
    • 171,618 Thanks
    Karmacat
    Blimey ... I really thought I'd almost finished dealing with the hedges that surround my garden, and that I could start everyday weeding (I've already got weeds a foot square ). But I haven't finished at all.

    I've just been working beneath a rhodedendron "tree", and there were half a dozen bramble roots still in there Then, at least I managed to finish off cutting back the hedge and even cutting back the "tree" a little more. Two effects: the ground will get more sunlight, so whatever I plant there will be happier. And more sun is getting to the mahonia nearby, and has been for a while - new shoots are growing on that side, and I know mahonia berries are edible. Keeping the hedges pruned back is utterly crucial, I've realised.
    Retired August 2016
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 14th May 18, 5:43 PM
    • 15,206 Posts
    • 147,394 Thanks
    mardatha
    Definitely. I've been asking on a forum what to grow next to a 5ft tall leylandii - and they all keep telling me Mediterrenean plants. That might be ok in the south of England but it's no good up here. I can't keep Rosemary alive through a winter, and lavender gets very poor and scraggy. Anything at all delicate like basil is a no-chance. I need a book on Gardening in the Himalayas
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 14th May 18, 6:29 PM
    • 6,273 Posts
    • 30,085 Thanks
    pineapple
    Definitely. I've been asking on a forum what to grow next to a 5ft tall leylandii - and they all keep telling me Mediterrenean plants. That might be ok in the south of England but it's no good up here. I can't keep Rosemary alive through a winter, and lavender gets very poor and scraggy. Anything at all delicate like basil is a no-chance. I need a book on Gardening in the Himalayas
    Originally posted by mardatha
    Mardatha I'm in Cumbria just over the Scottish border. I have a v large potted Rosemary and it does very well. In fact it is in flower right now. But it gets lots of sun. Does your Leylandii cast shade? Don't laugh but I'm growing one as a specimen. It is over 5 foot and am waiting till it gets to 6, then I'll keep it that height and it will fill out.
    But the problem with planting near Leylandii is their root system and the fact that they grab water and nutrients.
    But there is plenty of online discussion about this such as here.
    http://mygarden.rhs.org.uk/forums/t/5797.aspx
    I actually have mine next to my veggie patch but it doesn't cast shade and I just grow salad things anyway.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 14th May 18, 9:03 PM
    • 15,206 Posts
    • 147,394 Thanks
    mardatha
    It's the height here I think, and the exposure to wind that ruins plants. We get a lot of snow every winter and it's been down to -19 before. I don't mind the hedge at all pineapple, it's to the east of me and only casts shade until about 11am/noon. But I do want to fill out that border with some colour in summer. TY for that link x
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 14th May 18, 9:08 PM
    • 10,335 Posts
    • 56,054 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    Another beautiful day, but I've been at work for most of it.
    1984 WAS NOT AN INSTRUCTION MANUAL.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - 1308

    You can't be a Christian AND a Socialist.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 15th May 18, 6:33 AM
    • 12,101 Posts
    • 233,250 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Another beautiful day, but I've been at work for most of it.
    Originally posted by Bedsit Bob
    Ditto. By the time I was free to be on the allotment, it was distinctly chilly but I was still able to fit 1.5 hrs of cultivation in. Got home at 8.45 pm!

    Karmakat, where you've opened up the light, expect a gadzillion weeds to germinate. I can see some bramble suckers popping up in the tater patch (short version is they leapfrogged over from Plot2 when it was under its previous management). I shall get rid of them this year or next at the latest.

    I also have a goodish clump of bramble (about the size of a coffee table) on Plot2 which will require the mattock. I cut it down to ground level a few weeks ago but always knew that's just an incentive to a bramble and that Cold Steel would have to be involved eventually.

    I shall wait until a day where I'm feeling particularly strong and/or stroppy, then just go for it.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 15th May 18, 11:14 AM
    • 29,763 Posts
    • 171,618 Thanks
    Karmacat
    Very true about the new weeds to be expected, GQ! My first task today is to get yesterday's detritus out to the bin, there's quite a lot of it! Then the washing can get hung out, and if there's any energy left over after that, there'll be more digging

    Honestly, if I suddenly **needed** food from my garden, I'd be in a bit of trouble. But I'd be in a *lot* of trouble if I hadn't done what I've already done

    Question people always used to talk about cutting back bulb foliage - I never have, but I'm starting to want to. I have bluebells that surround the compost bin. They're very nice, but they're over now (sorry Mar!) can I just cut them down, while leaving the bulbs in situ of course, and chuck the foliage in the compost bin? I can't reach the bin at all right now and when things are settled, I might well try to move it.
    Retired August 2016
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 15th May 18, 11:48 AM
    • 12,604 Posts
    • 174,739 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    If we are collectively 'insane' then we're in good company of each other, I rather see it as being the few 'sighted' folk in the planet of the blind! I don't actually care what opinion others have of me, I hold dear the skills and attitude to modern life that I have and I hope I might have a slightly better chance of making it through difficult times should they occur and might just be able to get my nearest and dearest through them too. We're a living encyclopaedia of forgotten skills and methods we Preppers, I don't eschew the push button society but I don't find 99.9% of it of any use whatsoever and it's not part of how we live, I just find satisfaction in being able to do useful things from scratch to finish be that growing our food from seeds, being able to skin and process game etc., being able to knap flint, being able to forage and help feed and medicate us or any of the broad spectrum of knowledge based skills that are deemed obscelete and not needed in this instant fix society we live amongst. I'm a dinosaur but I'm a happy one!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 15th May 18, 2:52 PM
    • 10,335 Posts
    • 56,054 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    Well, I'm off today, so enjoying the sunny weather.

    On the down side, there's the two medical appointments I've had to attend.
    1984 WAS NOT AN INSTRUCTION MANUAL.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - 1308

    You can't be a Christian AND a Socialist.
    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 15th May 18, 4:33 PM
    • 5,834 Posts
    • 63,406 Thanks
    ivyleaf
    I hope they went all right, Bob.

    We had to collect DGS from school because "someone pushed him into a fence" Hopefully just a one-off incident.
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 15th May 18, 6:20 PM
    • 10,335 Posts
    • 56,054 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    I hope they went all right, Bob.
    Originally posted by ivyleaf
    Don't know yet.

    First one was a blood test for kidney function, after they doubled the dose of my blood pressure medication.

    Second one was an Ultrasound examination of my shoulder, which has found a small, partial thickness, tear of a tendon/ligament.
    1984 WAS NOT AN INSTRUCTION MANUAL.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - 1308

    You can't be a Christian AND a Socialist.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 15th May 18, 6:39 PM
    • 12,101 Posts
    • 233,250 Thanks
    GreyQueen

    Question people always used to talk about cutting back bulb foliage - I never have, but I'm starting to want to. I have bluebells that surround the compost bin. They're very nice, but they're over now (sorry Mar!) can I just cut them down, while leaving the bulbs in situ of course, and chuck the foliage in the compost bin? I can't reach the bin at all right now and when things are settled, I might well try to move it.
    Originally posted by Karmacat
    The foliage needs to be left to die back so the nutrients in the leaves can be re-absorbed into the bulb. If you cut the leaves off, you deprive the bulb of their goodness and it may not flower, or will flower badly, the following year. Even the habit that some folk have of tying up messy daffodil leaves while they die back is not recommended nowadays. HTH.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 15th May 18, 9:06 PM
    • 29,763 Posts
    • 171,618 Thanks
    Karmacat
    I had a suspicion that was the case, GQ, thanks. It helps in the sense that accurate information always helps but its not *convenient* information, if you know what I mean

    I'll carry on with the letting-them-die-back-naturally ... and later in the year, I'm definitely going to move the compost bin. Or find one that actually works.
    Retired August 2016
    • juliettet
    • By juliettet 16th May 18, 10:37 AM
    • 642 Posts
    • 4,107 Thanks
    juliettet
    GQ, do the bulbs need to be in compost? Can I dry out on the ground?
    • ivyleaf
    • By ivyleaf 16th May 18, 3:38 PM
    • 5,834 Posts
    • 63,406 Thanks
    ivyleaf
    Don't know yet.

    First one was a blood test for kidney function, after they doubled the dose of my blood pressure medication.

    Second one was an Ultrasound examination of my shoulder, which has found a small, partial thickness, tear of a tendon/ligament.
    Originally posted by Bedsit Bob
    So sorry about the shoulder, it must be very painful.. the same thing happened to a friend; when they told her she had a torn ligament in her shoulder she said "But how on earth did that happen?" to which the reply was "We don't know, it's just one of those things that happens sometimes!"
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 16th May 18, 4:24 PM
    • 12,101 Posts
    • 233,250 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    GQ, do the bulbs need to be in compost? Can I dry out on the ground?
    Originally posted by juliettet
    Hmm, I'm slightly confused by the question, is this because you have bulbs that are/ were in pots?

    The bulbs will go dormant for several months, so they should be all right whether you leave them in compost or lie them around nekkid (so to speak). I'd have them underground by September, tho.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 16th May 18, 5:28 PM
    • 12,604 Posts
    • 174,739 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    We're doing a boot fair as sellers this weekend and I am going through all our possessions to root out the things we've just been hanging on to but haven't used in umpteen years. I've been through my prepping gear too and am shedding the stove top coffee percolator and some half moon saucepans with lids. If anyone would like either of them PM me and I'll pop them in the post for you, if not I'll try to sell them at the boot fair. If I cull the book collection too I'll post any titles I'm shedding here so if anyone wants them do the same thing.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 16th May 18, 5:58 PM
    • 29,763 Posts
    • 171,618 Thanks
    Karmacat
    Thats a kind thing, Mrs LW - I'm okay for stuff, but I'll keep a look out for what books you post up, and work out a way to send postage money.
    Retired August 2016
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 16th May 18, 6:01 PM
    • 12,604 Posts
    • 174,739 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    It's hens teeth rare to find like minded pals Karma, happy to do it!

    Your Brick Oven building it and baking in it by Russell Jeavons.
    Home Poultry Keeping an Invest in Living publication
    Making and Using Dried Foods by Phyllis Hobson
    Preserving Food without Freezing or Canning by The Gardeners and Farmers of Terre Vivante.

    All offered from my downstairs book case.
    Last edited by MrsLurcherwalker; 16-05-2018 at 6:09 PM.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 16th May 18, 6:59 PM
    • 12,101 Posts
    • 233,250 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Manya true word spoken in jest: http://www.thedailymash.co.uk/news/environment/cat-goes-outside-to-commit-atrocities-20180411147075
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

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