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    • ancientofdays
    • By ancientofdays 10th Mar 18, 12:30 PM
    • 1,594 Posts
    • 18,881 Thanks
    ancientofdays
    And the only three tools against it are flintheartedness, glyphosate and routine burning of every remaining particle.

    That I know of. Whereas Himself yearns over a rotavator...
    Originally posted by DigForVictory
    Quite satisfying pulling the roots out though. Or maybe I'm strange, I love stripping wallpaper too, which has little to do with allotments well nothing at all really.
    I was jumping to conclusions and one of them jumped back
    • Nargleblast
    • By Nargleblast 10th Mar 18, 2:59 PM
    • 9,063 Posts
    • 57,221 Thanks
    Nargleblast
    I've googled bindweed and I haven't seen that here. Not complaining though. My main moan is chickweed - was ok when I had chickens to eat it but now it's a pest.
    Originally posted by mardatha
    I am sure I have read somewhere that you can eat chickweed as a medicinal plant (must go consult Mr Google)
    Debt free date.....3 August 2015
    Now building up a Doomsday Cash Stash
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 10th Mar 18, 3:14 PM
    • 10,242 Posts
    • 55,062 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    Persisting down with rain here atm.
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - 1308

    Who are you to question why your god doesn't want me to believe in him?
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 10th Mar 18, 6:10 PM
    • 11,649 Posts
    • 162,096 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    You can eat chickweed as a pot herb and a salad plant, it's very nice as is Hairy Bitter Cress which grows equally prolifically in most cultivated plots. Chickweed has tiny white flowers which are also edible, it gets leggy and the stems are fibrous so it's best to eat them young. It used to be sold bunched as saladings in the spring after the hungry gap when there isn't much fresh green about and also as food for poultry hence the name Chickweed!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 10th Mar 18, 6:59 PM
    • 11,832 Posts
    • 228,299 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Quite satisfying pulling the roots out though. Or maybe I'm strange, I love stripping wallpaper too, which has little to do with allotments well nothing at all really.
    Originally posted by ancientofdays
    Snap! I find some tasks of this nature quite theraputic, but I do suffer from an over-busy brain so slow, painstaking work is very relaxing.

    I did up the horsetail roots and dry them out. Then I burn them, mwah ha ha. Let's see them regenerate after that!

    DigForVictory, that Bunny Guinness (sp?) off gardeners world is dead against rotovators. Says they ruin the soil structure and chop up the little critters, not to mention slicing and dicing perennial weed roots.

    Bindweed (both kinds), horsetails, docks and dandelions can all grow completely new plants from a couple of mm of chopped root. Why would anyone sane want to create more of the dadblasted things?!

    Mother Christmas has just treated me to a digital camera and I will take it up there and create a record of the Before, the During and the After, as well as the Weird S**t and the Produce.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 10th Mar 18, 10:04 PM
    • 7,687 Posts
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    DigForVictory
    Looking forward to the Weird! My lads have never forgotten the first time we dug the back garden, exhumed an Action Man, photographed him, did a bit of research, listed him on eBay & had watchers within 10 minutes.

    The Weird is Fun!

    (Huge relief rotovators are not always held up as The Answer but may indeed be part of The Problem.)
    • thriftwizard
    • By thriftwizard 11th Mar 18, 9:33 AM
    • 2,658 Posts
    • 33,248 Thanks
    thriftwizard
    The friend whose kitchen garden I helped with last summer has plenty of cause never to wish to see a rotavator again! Her ex's answer to everything is to rotavate, which neatly spread greater bindweed, field bindweed, couch grass & nettles throughout the full-size plot, as well as the previous year's un-dug potatoes, complete with eelworm. Towards the end of the summer we just gave up on it; she's tiny & has a bad back, and I was busy with our own plot, my mother & my vague attempts to earn a living; it would all need to be double-dug & sieved to get halfway on top of it organically. I did manage to introduce her to woven polyprop, which kept big patches clear, but we soon realised that it needs to be used in specific woven widths as the cut edges shred & tangle terribly - a big danger to wildlife.

    If we'd had any assurance that she'd still be there in five years' time, we'd have approached it quite differently, covering over areas & clearing them one by one to make raised beds that she could reach into the centre of to weed and crop. The soil desperately needed to rest & be "fed" with compost or the well-rotted-manure we couldn't get at thanks to the senile & delinquent goats; it was reduced to dust in any patches where the weeds hadn't taken hold, and was full of half-burnt bonfire debris. Yes, wood ash is good for the soil, but burnt tins, broken glass & melted plastic don't do a lot for it, or for the gardener who slices her hand open on it. The more I think about it, the crosser I get with the ex who left it like that & specified that she should keep it neat, tidy & in full production if she's to stay in her home... and whose answer was "just let me rotavate it again for you!"
    Last edited by thriftwizard; 11-03-2018 at 9:55 AM.
    Angie

    GC May 18 326.16/400
    Bulk-buy purse '18 145.26/250, pet & livestock food '18 131.45/300

    Money's just a substitute for time & talent...
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 11th Mar 18, 1:26 PM
    • 14,806 Posts
    • 141,234 Thanks
    mardatha
    How do you get rid of eelworm? I have them out the back garden and had to give up tatties for the last 2 years because of them.
    • JamesO
    • By JamesO 11th Mar 18, 2:01 PM
    • 356 Posts
    • 976 Thanks
    JamesO
    How do you get rid of eelworm? I have them out the back garden and had to give up tatties for the last 2 years because of them.
    Originally posted by mardatha
    Good sanitation practices in the garden

    Once the presence of stem and bulb eelworm has been confirmed, dig out any plant material showing signs of damage and also other apparently healthy host plants within a one metre radius. Removed bulbs and foliage should be treated as diseased material and not be disposed of in a garden compost heap.

    Leave fallow: If possible leave infested soil bare for at least three years and during this time continuously remove weeds that could be potential hosts plants.

    Hot water treatment: Hot water treatment can destroy the eelworms within the bulb. However, this is a difficult procedure without professional equipment, and usually limited to commercial production. Eelworms in bulbs can be killed by immersing the dormant bulbs in water held at 44.5C (112F) for three hours. Too much heat will damage the bulbs, while too little will allow the pest to survive. An insulated water tank with thermostatic controls is needed to maintain the correct temperature. After treatment, the bulbs should be planted in a different part of the garden with uninfested soil.

    Chemical control
    There are no pesticides available to home gardeners for dealing with stem and bulb eelworm, and so cultural methods should be used to lower infestation and minimize damage.
    https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=659
    ____________
    Blue Lives Matter
    • thriftwizard
    • By thriftwizard 11th Mar 18, 2:09 PM
    • 2,658 Posts
    • 33,248 Thanks
    thriftwizard
    I suspect she'd do best to fence that patch off & put the goats - or better still, a couple of pigs - on it for 3 years, and start another veg patch round by the manure mountain! But that would take resources that she just doesn't have.
    Angie

    GC May 18 326.16/400
    Bulk-buy purse '18 145.26/250, pet & livestock food '18 131.45/300

    Money's just a substitute for time & talent...
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 11th Mar 18, 3:22 PM
    • 14,806 Posts
    • 141,234 Thanks
    mardatha
    Thanks James, it has been empty for 3-4 years now and the only thing that grows there is chickweed. I'll wait till it comes through and dig some up and have a look at it. TY!
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 11th Mar 18, 4:42 PM
    • 7,687 Posts
    • 22,170 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    I'm a huge fan of pigs. The long snouted sorts are champion earthmovers, ploughing far more enthusiastically than any polluting machine, and not only do they eat almost everything, they manure the plot as well.

    Only problems are they can be escape artists, there's a pack of legislation & paperwork involved & you get human idiots coming over to gawk & or try to pet (or worse, feed) them. That aside, every allotment should have a pig available.

    As who else will rotovate constructively, fertilise, reproduce & make sausage, gammon etc when you need to load the freezer? (Hold on [if you can] til they've cleared any fruit windfalls - adds a glorious flavour!)

    Oh yes, and they are less fuss than teenage boys on at least four counts. Frankly, child labour is wildly overrated compared to pigs, who do not sulk if you refuse to lend your car [just one of the four agreed with a welsh pig breeder who is also mother of teenage lads.]

    ETA I googled & Pigs *Do* Eat Chickweed. Frankly, offspring dropping in my estimation.
    Last edited by DigForVictory; 11-03-2018 at 4:44 PM. Reason: chickweed solution
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 11th Mar 18, 6:51 PM
    • 11,832 Posts
    • 228,299 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    The humble porker is the foundation of peasant agriculture in northern Europe, much in the way that goats are for the Med and the Near/ Mid East.

    Wonderful things, pigs: amiable, intelligent, useful and, let's not beat about the bush, so very very tasty...........

    I would love to have the loaner of a porker or two for the new-to-me plot but alas, they're banned on lottie sites in this city.

    I haven't yet had the paperwork for the new plot, only the news I'm to get it, paperwork-to-follow, via email last Thursday, so I'm not doing a stroke until I have signed on the dotted line, in case it falls thru.

    I have prowled around on it, taken several photies with my new digi camera, and eyed up some useful as well as useless truck. I'm hoping ye outgoing tenant has left those items for moi but it's too early to start putting my mitts on things.

    I have moved 0.6 of a tonne of spent barley grains & a few hops from the communal pile to my lottie, each barrowload representing a 10 minute round trip. And forked them in, leaving that section of the lottie looking rather like a cake mix. It is an embryonic potato patch, am working towards sowing on Good Friday. I have volunteered my Dad to come and help and he's agreed with minimal resistance.

    Lottie II is 3.5 paces wide (some of that will be lost to a path) and 33m long. It contains; an unproductive plum tree, a compost bin, a compost bin with no bottom, a garden incinerator in good nick (), a wheelie bin, broken trellis, a rotting builders bag full of rubbish, lots and lots of loose rubbish and some things like crockery (half buried, will need further investigation).

    It's also couch grass from one end to the other, up and down like the ocean wave, and full of pernicious weeds.Betcha there will be a lot of grubs in that soil; leather-jackets, chafer grubs, cut-worms. The birds will have a field day, I've had blackbirds fighting over Lottie I with me on it today, for the rights to grubble in the soil.

    I'm so excited I can hardly wait to get on there with Cold Steel and my steel-toed DMs and show it who's da boss!
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • westcoastscot
    • By westcoastscot 12th Mar 18, 4:11 PM
    • 1,385 Posts
    • 17,108 Thanks
    westcoastscot
    Interesting to hear the rotovator stories :-)
    We loved ours - it did sterling work for many years on our working croft. Nothing really got the chance to grow back as we were all over it every day - we did keep a pair of pigs from spring to autumn who did a permanent job of clearing the ground.
    Best thing ever for clearing the ground infested with bracken? We were taken off the hill once by the RAF, on a medical evac - they couldn't drive us along the track to meet them (4 miles off road) so asked where best to land. I recalled that way back a nearby bits had been a tennis court, but now a field of bracken, so they hovered over it to make sure no big stones were in the way and landed. The bracken never recovered - it was amazing!!
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 12th Mar 18, 6:00 PM
    • 10,242 Posts
    • 55,062 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    Hospital Grab Bag.
    OK, not one to procrastinate, I decided I should assemble a Hospital Grab Bag, and here it is.


    Working clockwise from the bag itself, the items are:-

    Bath Towel
    Lip Balm
    Razor and Cartridges
    Shaving Gel
    Toothpaste
    Toothbrushes
    Soap
    Toilet Wipes
    Paper Handkerchiefs
    Slippers
    Pyjamas
    Plimsolls
    Underpants
    Reading Glasses
    Socks x 2 pairs
    Mobile Phone Charger
    Radio
    AA Batteries x 12 (6 sets for the radio)
    Headphones
    Paperback Book

    Still to be added is:-
    List of Medications
    List of useful Phone Numbers
    Money.

    Anything I've missed anyone?

    BTW: It occurs to me, it'll double as an emergency overnight bag, if I have to evacuate to a local church hall etc., or charge off to a relative/friend, at the other end of the country/world.

    EDIT: Added one item. A can of Deodorant.

    Not going to retake the photo for that.
    Last edited by Bedsit Bob; 12-03-2018 at 6:56 PM.
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - 1308

    Who are you to question why your god doesn't want me to believe in him?
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 12th Mar 18, 7:02 PM
    • 11,832 Posts
    • 228,299 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Looks pretty comprehensive, BB. Although at the rate I read, I'd need a couple of books.

    What about some deodorant? A fabric eyeshade such as you get for free in a complementary kit on some flights? Cutting out ambient light might help you rest better.

    I signed for my lottie this afternoon (electonically speaking), paid for it and charged up there on the pushbike and spent 80 miutes hauling stuff about and building a mahoosive bonfire pile. Gonna let things dry out in the heap for a couple of weeks (it's built around some knackered trellis so plenty of air circulating) then it'll be burn, baby, burn.

    Nights are really starting to pull out, I left at 6.30 pm and it wasn't fully dark then.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 12th Mar 18, 7:12 PM
    • 10,242 Posts
    • 55,062 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    What about some deodorant?
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    Already spotted that and added it, but thanks for the suggestion.

    A fabric eyeshade such as you get for free in a complementary kit on some flights? Cutting out ambient light might help you rest better.
    Good idea. I'll get one tomorrow, and maybe some earplugs too.

    When I was in the other week, there was a guy in the bed opposite who could sleep not just for England, but for Scotland, Ireland and Wales too, and boy could he snore!!!
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - 1308

    Who are you to question why your god doesn't want me to believe in him?
    • Bedsit Bob
    • By Bedsit Bob 12th Mar 18, 7:29 PM
    • 10,242 Posts
    • 55,062 Thanks
    Bedsit Bob
    One thing that does occur is, what if I was to become unconscious en-route to hospital?

    They'd need to know what medications I'm on, and what I'm allergic to.

    Putting those details in a note, inside the bag, might mean they get missed.

    Any ideas?
    My job is Top Secret. Even I don't know what I'm doing.

    Amount I have so far denied the BBC - 1308

    Who are you to question why your god doesn't want me to believe in him?
    • Bigjenny
    • By Bigjenny 12th Mar 18, 7:43 PM
    • 528 Posts
    • 5,714 Thanks
    Bigjenny
    Not particularly related to Bedsit Bob's post but it might be worth getting one of these http://www.lions105sw.org.uk/district-projects/message-in-a-bottle/, to keep in the fridge, they come with a sticker to place on the front door, especially if anyone live on their own.

    I got mine from the Boots Pharmacy as my Doctors Practice didn't know about them, not sure where else they are available from.
    Last edited by Bigjenny; 12-03-2018 at 7:47 PM.
    "When one door closes another door opens; but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us" Alexander Graham Bell
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 12th Mar 18, 7:57 PM
    • 11,832 Posts
    • 228,299 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    One thing that does occur is, what if I was to become unconscious en-route to hospital?

    They'd need to know what medications I'm on, and what I'm allergic to.

    Putting those details in a note, inside the bag, might mean they get missed.

    Any ideas?
    Originally posted by Bedsit Bob
    Get SOS Talisan or a MedicAlert. You can get pendants or bracelet style. Medics and first aiders are trained to look for them. My lifesaving meds are listed in my SOS pendant, along with everything from next-of-kin, blood type, GP, consultant, NHS number, hospital number etc etc.

    The hospital have registered me with the local ambulance trust, so they know what to do if they find me in X. Y or z states. It only links to my home address, so no good if I'm taken ill/ injured elsewhere. I have some rather interesting and life-threatening health problems........
    Last edited by GreyQueen; 12-03-2018 at 7:59 PM.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

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