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  • FIRST POST
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 9th Jun 15, 7:25 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Green, ethical, energy issues in the news (last 2 weeks)
    • #1
    • 9th Jun 15, 7:25 AM
    Green, ethical, energy issues in the news (last 2 weeks) 9th Jun 15 at 7:25 AM
    MSE Insert:

    We've seen some debate on this thread about the relevance of some posts to the topic.

    To ensure the thread remains on topic for forumites wanting to discuss the latest news we're asking that all posts contain a link to the news you're discussing.

    For the purposes of this thread the "news" needs to be within the last two weeks.

    Back to Martyn1981's original post.

    ---

    I thought it might be a good idea to have a thread for posting general news items that may be of interest.

    PV and the 'Solar in the news' thread attract a lot of interest, so here's a thread for all the other goings on.

    Mart.
    Last edited by Former MSE Andrea; 09-10-2018 at 10:41 AM.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
Page 219
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 9th Jan 20, 1:49 PM
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    Coastalwatch
    Deny till you die!

    So, those FF companies that knew AGW was real and serious 50 odd years ago, but campaigned/funded the opposite, are now at it again.

    This time they are promoting natural gas (also known as FF methane, before it got the PR treatment) as the solution to reducing coal emissions.

    Of course they could promote RE as the solution to FF emissions, rather than just reducing FF emissions down to a level that is still not sustainable.

    Remember, FF's are not evil, they are currently essential to our economies, but denial of the damage they are causing, denial of the need to move away from them, and denial of the rate of change needed now is perhaps starting to border on the edge of the 'E' word, especially for those individuals actively campaigning to misinform.

    Oil companies are spending billions on PR – but are they winning?
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Indeed Mart, they may not be winning but the myth spreading goes on apparently. In Australia the Greens are being blamed for supposed arson attacks to make the fires look like global warming however an investigation into the "facts and figures" behind these posts show them to be misinformation. Now where have we heard that before!
    Nice to have a balanced view on matters. Happy viewing.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/world-australia-51043826/debunking-australia-arson-emergency-claims
    Last edited by Coastalwatch; 09-01-2020 at 11:17 PM. Reason: "show them to be misinformation. Now where have we heard that before!" added.
    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus one dirty diesel. Still waiting for V2H and home storage to become available at sensible cost.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 10th Jan 20, 8:39 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Little and large in wind news, or perhaps little/large and large.

    Small(ish) on-shore wind farm for Wales, but with some mighty big on-shore WT's:

    EDF unveils 110MW Welsh wind plan

    EDF Renewables has unveiled plans for an up to 110MW onshore wind farm in Wales.

    The Garn Fach project will comprise up to 22 turbines with individual capacity of about 5MW, the company said.

    EDF has carried out ecological and other feasibility surveys and today is submitting an environmental scoping report to the Welsh Government and an application to Powys County Council to erect a met mast on site to gather wind speed data.
    It aims to submit a planning application at the end of the year.

    The company said that Garn Fach will support a £5000 per MW community benefit fund, which could be worth around £550,000 a year – depending on the final capacity.


    And a look towards 2040 off-shore wind capacity of 400GW, which for context would be roughly 5x the UK's current annual leccy generation/consumption.

    Offshore wind to 'top 400GW by 2040'

    Global offshore wind installations will hit 165GW by the end of the decade and are on track to reach 418GW by 2040, according to new research by UK analysts Rethink Energy.

    The global expansion of offshore wind will see the technology provide 5% of global electricity in two decades, as installed capacity balloons from the 25GW installed worldwide today.

    The report predicts this growth will require some $1.3 trillion in investment and create 8 million jobs.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 11th Jan 20, 9:02 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Strong words from Greta, but I think she has a point:

    Greta Thunberg tells world leaders to end fossil fuel ‘madness’

    The 21 young activists are also calling on the political and business leaders who will be attending the World Economic Forum in Davos to ensure investment funds dump their holdings in fossil fuel companies.

    “Anything less would be a betrayal against life itself,” said Thunberg and colleagues in an article in the Guardian. “Today’s business as usual is turning into a crime against humanity. We demand that you play your part in putting an end to this madness.”

    The burning of fossil fuels is the biggest driver of the climate emergency. Scientists predict catastrophic impacts unless deep cuts in emissions are made rapidly, but global emissions are still rising.

    “Young people are being let down by older generations and those in power,” the climate strikers said. “To some it may seem like we are asking for a lot. But this is just the very minimum effort needed to start the rapid sustainable transition.”

    Much of the world’s existing coal, oil and gas reserves must be kept in the ground to avoid the worst impacts of global heating. But investment in fossil fuel exploration and extraction remains high.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 12th Jan 20, 11:58 AM
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    Coastalwatch
    And the demand for renewable energy of evergrowing proportions should do no harm at all in keeping up the pressure(as if it should be necessary) to those in charge of the need for even greater generation from renewable sources.



    https://www.solarpowerportal.co.uk/news/city_of_london_tendering_for_55gwh_of_renewables_a nnually
    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus one dirty diesel. Still waiting for V2H and home storage to become available at sensible cost.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 12th Jan 20, 7:20 PM
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    Slinky
    And the demand for renewable energy of evergrowing proportions should do no harm at all in keeping up the pressure(as if it should be necessary) to those in charge of the need for even greater generation from renewable sources.



    https://www.solarpowerportal.co.uk/news/city_of_london_tendering_for_55gwh_of_renewables_a nnually
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch

    Link not working
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 12th Jan 20, 8:32 PM
    • 850 Posts
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    Coastalwatch
    Link not working
    Originally posted by Slinky
    Thanks for that, try this one!

    https://www.solarpowerportal.co.uk/news/city_of_london_tendering_for_55gwh_of_renewables
    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23° pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus one dirty diesel. Still waiting for V2H and home storage to become available at sensible cost.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 13th Jan 20, 7:14 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Understanding wise regarding the intricacies of such contracts, I'm borderline like a dog trying to understand how to drive a car, but I wonder if the cost is approx 5p/kWh or £50/MWh which seems very good:

    The City of London is looking for a project, or portfolio of projects, in Great Britain that is not fully operational before the PPA is signed. The PPAs will have a term of 15 years, with an estimated annual contract value of £2,025,000.

    It expects the project, which could include either a single generation asset, several assets, or a proportion of a larger asset, to provide an average of c.35-55GWh per annum. This should have a P50 output of near to 45Gwh preferably, it said.
    ~£2m / 45GWh = 4.5p/kWh.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 13th Jan 20, 7:23 AM
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    Martyn1981
    The US seems to be learning more about fracking, and loving it ever less as they do so.

    Natural Gas Provided False Promise, Deception — Severe Health Problems From “Natural” Gas

    Some of the chemicals used have now been proven to cause significant health problems, and will for generations to come. A new white paper by Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR), “Climate and Health Risks of Liquified Natural Gas,” highlights some of these problems.

    A Yale study published that of 1,021 chemicals were identified in fracking fluids. Of those identified, a great many showed dramatic contraindication for human or animal water supply. At least 157 were disruptive, disturbing, or toxic to the human reproductive system or human development. Chemicals that had federal guidelines regulating them — arsenic, benzene, cadmium, lead, formaldehyde, chlorine, and mercury — and 157 others were associated with either developmental or reproductive toxicity.

    “The hydraulic fracturing extraction process injects a slurry of chemicals and millions of gallons of water thousands of feet underground at high pressure,” the article states.

    The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) build more on the body of information, revealing associated problems. An article titled “The False Promise of Natural Gas” by Philip J. Landrigan, M.D., Howard Frumkin, M.D., Dr.P.H., and Brita E. Lundberg, M.D., reports, “Natural gas, composed principally of methane, has been hailed as a clean ‘transition’ fuel—a bridge from the coal and oil of the past to the clean energy sources of the future … but beneath this rosy narrative lies a more complex story. Gas is associated with health and environmental hazards and reduced social welfare at every stage of its life cycle.”
    “As physicians deeply concerned about climate change and pollution and their consequences, we consider expansion of the natural gas infrastructure to be a grave hazard to human health,” the report states.

    Laalitha Surapaneni, MD, MPH, lead author of “Climate and Health Risks of Liquified Natural Gas,” adds, “Our current climate crisis is a health emergency. The actions we take now by extracting, transporting and liquefying fracked gas will determine the health of generations to come. It is unconscionable that we continue to subject our communities to these risks when we have the technology to make a just transition to renewable energy.”

    Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR) encourages everyone to share information about the health risks of LNG and advocate for a rapid transition to clean, safe renewable energy solutions such as solar, wind and geothermal.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 13th Jan 20, 7:37 AM
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    Martyn1981
    A couple of articles on UK Universities divesting from FF's as the number has grown and crossed the 50% milestone. Note that some have divested, some are committed to divest, and some are only divesting from certain fuel types, but it's heading in the right direction.

    Half of UK universities have committed to divest from fossil fuel


    Universities divesting from fossil fuels have made history, but the fight isn't over
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 13th Jan 20, 12:16 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Some Carbon commentary extracts from this weeks newsletter:

    1, CCS from cement. Occidental Petroleum (Oxy) is one of the major backers of Carbon Engineering’s direct air capture technology. The CO2 from the first commercial plant will be injected into its Permian Basin fracking wells to enhance the amount of oil produced. Oxy has just announced another partnership with cement producer LafargeHolcim to investigate carbon capture at a cement works in Colorado using the very interesting technology offered by Canada’s Svante. Once again, the assumption is that Oxy sees the CO2 as being useful in improving oilfield yields so the true amount of carbon capture is a highly contentious calculation.


    2, Zero carbon urban development. Toyota gave details of its plan to build a 70 hectare, 2000 person town at the base of Mount Fuji. It will be the site for a very wide range of experiments in zero carbon living, including autonomous vehicles, fuel cell power systems and wood-based buildings. Researchers will live there alongside the other residents. Toyota calls it ‘a fully connected ecosystem powered by hydrogen’.


    3, Electricity prices. A week of high winds over the UK reduced short-term electricity prices. All seven nights saw figures of below £10 (€12) per megawatt hour for periods, with three nights touching zero. Carbon intensity fell to as low as 62 grams per kilowatt hour, not that far from last year’s record lows. The projected further investment in 30 gigawatts of onshore wind by 2030 would have meant that total demand would have been met entirely by wind for many of the night hours this week. As yet, I see no serious consideration in the UK of what will happen when wind power systematically exceeds power demand.***


    4, Adding hydrogen to natural gas. Increasing the content of renewable hydrogen in natural gas reduces CO2 emissions. Several countries around Europe are carefully edging up the percentage of hydrogen allowed in the pipes. Snam, the Italian gas distributor, increased the H2 content to 10% in one portion of its network, while a major experiment in the UK is now putting 20% into pipes around a university. Energy giant E.ON is beginning an similar experiment in Saxony also taking hydrogen up to 20%. But it is unlikely that levels can be raised much higher without new central heating boilers in domestic homes. So is raising H2 levels a technological dead-end when what we will eventually need is a 100% hydrogen grid? Perhaps not, partly because hydrogen can be separated from natural gas at its destination. So the existing network can in effect be used as a distribution medium for pure hydrogen while users switch away from methane. This may be the cheapest way of shipping hydrogen across land masses.


    6, Waste CO2 and hydrogen to synthetic fuels. A Finnish cement producer and a chemicals manufacturer with surplus hydrogen have partnered with a wide variety of other businesses to commission a study into using their waste gases to make methanol, a precursor to a wide variety of other fuels. The work will be carried out by LUT, the university now the world leader in research into synthetic fuels. A senior LUT academic commented ‘that the production costs for synthetic fuels are already reasonable in areas where the price of hydrogen or electricity is low’. Other study participants include Shell, Wartsila, Neste and Finnair, suggesting widening interest in developing low-cost substitutes for oil.


    10, Drones for planting trees. Companies and politicians want to increase the rates of forest planting. The world needs many billions of new trees. A Canadian company has invented a drone that plants germinated tree seeds encased in nutrient pods. The device pneumatically fires the pods into the ground and can plant up to 20,000 seeds a day. (That’s at least 10 times what human labour can do). The company says that the world cuts down 13 billion trees a year, so - in theory - less than 2,000 drones could reverse all deforestation. A Kickstarter campaign, with a very good video showing how the drone operates, is here.
    *** This will probably become the most interesting/exciting part of the conversation going forward. Loads of tasty tidbits of news for greedy Marty!
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 13th Jan 20, 1:54 PM
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    pile-o-stone
    The cost of Germany turning off nuclear power: Thousands of lives
    Interesting article about the decision Germany made to decommission their nuclear power stations, replacing them with coal fired power and the subsequent impact on their citizen's health.

    I guess the counter argument could be that we will never know if a nuclear accident could have occurred had they been left on?

    https://grist.org/energy/the-cost-of-germany-going-off-nuclear-power-thousands-of-lives/

    "Back in 2011, Germany decided that it was done with nuclear power. The Fukushima Daiichi plant had just melted down in Japan, and the threat of disaster seemed overwhelming."

    "In the years since, Germany has closed 11 plants, and is scheduled to shutter the remaining six in the next two years."

    "Multiple studies since then suggest that Germany did more harm than good. In the latest of these studies, a working paper recently published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, three economists modeled Germany’s electrical system to see what would have happened if it had kept those nuclear plants running. Their conclusion: It would have saved the lives of 1,100 people a year who succumb to air pollution released by coal burning power plants."
    5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
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    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 13th Jan 20, 3:21 PM
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    silverwhistle
    Some Carbon commentary extracts from this weeks newsletter:

    *** This will probably become the most interesting/exciting part of the conversation going forward. Loads of tasty tidbits of news for greedy Marty!
    Originally posted by Martyn1981

    What will happen when wind power systematically exceeds demand is that at least some of us will try and gain some benefit via demand and usage management. On Friday I'm having a smart meter put in and once it's commissioned I'll be on Octopus Agile tariff. At some stage I'd like to get an EV but even before then I can see benefits with a little commonsense: today for example unit rates between 8&9p until the 16.00 to 19.00 period when they leap into the 20s before falling back again.



    So in the initial stages the growth in the number of EVs will help. With longer ranges people will be able to time their charging to reflect costs. Beyond that there must be lots of potential for interruptible processes: grain drying, storing process heat, etc, before moving on to the bigger investments and newer technology of hydrogen production and the like.
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 13th Jan 20, 6:45 PM
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    GreatApe
    What will happen when wind power systematically exceeds demand is that at least some of us will try and gain some benefit via demand and usage management. On Friday I'm having a smart meter put in and once it's commissioned I'll be on Octopus Agile tariff. At some stage I'd like to get an EV but even before then I can see benefits with a little commonsense: today for example unit rates between 8&9p until the 16.00 to 19.00 period when they leap into the 20s before falling back again.

    So in the initial stages the growth in the number of EVs will help. With longer ranges people will be able to time their charging to reflect costs. Beyond that there must be lots of potential for interruptible processes: grain drying, storing process heat, etc, before moving on to the bigger investments and newer technology of hydrogen production and the like.
    Originally posted by silverwhistle


    The best technology because it's as close to free as you can get is smart heaters

    People with gas boilers install a couple of smart heaters in their homes

    When there is excess wind and prices are cheap the smart heaters turn on which effectively means the gas boiler will back off saving on natural gas

    The process is more than 100% efficient (in that 1 unit of electricity saves More than 1 unit of natural gas) in converting electricity to natural gas and doesn't require huge investments in hydrogen facilities. It's also 100% clean while no chemicals industry is 100% clean

    It can also be deployed overnight, literally in one single day you can buy a heater and a smart plug and away you go. While it would take how many years and billions to try and build a mass hydrogen or syn fuel industry??

    The scale of the ability of dual fuel homes and businesses is also vast
    Perhaps as big as 100GW in the UK alone
    The real limit is how much the grid can handle and or how much we want to upgrade the grid to handle more power
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 13th Jan 20, 6:48 PM
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    GreatApe
    I guess the counter argument could be that we will never know if a nuclear accident could have occurred had they been left on?
    Originally posted by pile-o-stone
    Nuclear accidents don't cause much harm

    The worst was Chernobyl but that didn't have containment
    All German nukes do have containment
    Worse that can happen is something like Fukushima
    The radiation of Which killed.... virtually no one

    However the cost of cleaning up the radiation which could be zero if you wish, won't be zero so there is a real cost in that regard

    Anyway it's too late for the German nukes they are gone in 2-3 years time
    Last edited by GreatApe; 13-01-2020 at 8:11 PM.
    • Hexane
    • By Hexane 14th Jan 20, 12:56 AM
    • 189 Posts
    • 213 Thanks
    Hexane
    Nuclear accidents don't cause much harm
    Originally posted by GreatApe
    I am sure you are right, but in the meantime General Bear AI has had to pull on his woolly underpants! https://duckduckgo.com/?q=AI+winter He is very upset that no-one has solved hearting yet.
    7.25 kWp PV system (4.1kW WSW & 3.15kW ENE), Solis inverter, myenergi eddi & harvi for energy diversion to immersion heater. myenergi hub for Virtual Power Plant demand-side response trial.
    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 14th Jan 20, 10:23 AM
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    pile-o-stone
    Nuclear accidents don't cause much harm
    Originally posted by GreatApe
    They're great for wildlife.

    The 1000 square mile exclusion zone around Chernobyl became a wildlife haven after 350,000 people were evacuated from the area following the nuclear disaster.

    https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2019/may/28/chernobyl-wildlife-haven-tour-belarus-created-nuclear-disaster-zone

    Similaly, the 30 square mile exclusion zone around Fukishima hasbecome a wildlife haven after 156,000 people were evacuated from the area following the nuclear disaster

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7873865/Wildlife-flourishing-exclusion-zone-disabled-Fukushima-nuclear-reactor.html

    Yet, while wildlife is flourishing in the absence of mankind, they are suffering from the ill effects of our man made disaster with issues such as cataracts, tumors and sterility.

    https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/chernobyl-and-fukushima-radioactivity-has-seriously-harmed-wildlife/
    5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
    Solar iBoost+ to two immersion heaters on 300L thermal store.
    Vegan household with 100% composted food waste
    Mini orchard planted and vegetable allotment created.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 14th Jan 20, 3:38 PM
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    Martyn1981
    They're great for wildlife.
    Originally posted by pile-o-stone
    Incredible that somebody could claim a lack of harm, and think it worth sharing on a green and ethical thread/board. Oh well.

    I wonder how much RE generation capacity the $200bn clean up for Fukushima would buy, probably somewhere around 200GW?

    Imagine that, the equivalent of the entire UK's RE needs pee'd up against the wall. Bit sad.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 14th Jan 20, 4:01 PM
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    pile-o-stone
    Incredible that somebody could claim a lack of harm, and think it worth sharing on a green and ethical thread/board. Oh well.

    I wonder how much RE generation capacity the $200bn clean up for Fukushima would buy, probably somewhere around 200GW?

    Imagine that, the equivalent of the entire UK's RE needs pee'd up against the wall. Bit sad.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Perhaps the loss of 1000 square miles is a small price to pay for expensive energy? To put that into perspective, Greater London is 600 square miles. It's not just the loss of land and all other industry within that land, it's the cost of relocating people elsewhere and the pressure that would put on other regions to try and house so many people.
    5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
    Solar iBoost+ to two immersion heaters on 300L thermal store.
    Vegan household with 100% composted food waste
    Mini orchard planted and vegetable allotment created.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 14th Jan 20, 4:22 PM
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    Martyn1981
    RE generation in Europe last year was greater than FF gen and also greater than nuclear. Gas is doing comparably well v's coal too.

    Renewables ‘dominate’ European energy mix in 2019

    The company’s latest report on the EU power market found renewables generated 1029 terawatt hours (TWh) last year, compared with 941TWh generated by fossil fuels and 777TWh from nuclear plants.
    In 2019, gas-fired plants produced 500.5TWh, up from 265.7TWh in 2015, versus 419.6TWh from coal/lignite (down from 617.6TWh in 2015).

    Harreman added: “One of the major changes seen in Europe in recent years – and in 2019 in particular – has been the transition from coal and lignite sources to gas. This trend has been driven largely by low gas prices and the increase in carbon prices, which makes generation from so-called ‘dirty’ fuels less attractive.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 14th Jan 20, 7:13 PM
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    GreatApe
    Perhaps the loss of 1000 square miles is a small price to pay for expensive energy? To put that into perspective, Greater London is 600 square miles. It's not just the loss of land and all other industry within that land, it's the cost of relocating people elsewhere and the pressure that would put on other regions to try and house so many people.
    Originally posted by pile-o-stone

    It's mostly fake news

    https://youtu.be/ciStnd9Y2ak

    Nuclear could play a big part but it's not at all likely

    Nuclear expansion dream died when the world figured out that CCGTs cost 1/20th as much to build and staff as a nuke. Not to forget their amazing 63% efficiency operated as base load and the abundance of NG the world finds itself in
    Last edited by GreatApe; 14-01-2020 at 7:59 PM.
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