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  • FIRST POST
    • armyknife
    • By armyknife 28th Jan 15, 2:55 PM
    • 592Posts
    • 2,502Thanks
    armyknife
    Aren't Bicycles Great.
    • #1
    • 28th Jan 15, 2:55 PM
    Aren't Bicycles Great. 28th Jan 15 at 2:55 PM
    Aren't bicycles great, a simple machine that let's people get places in a low cost, low impact way. Can even be maintained by people with limited mechanical skills like me.

    So what are you cycle transport plans for 2015?

    I'm planning on doing more long distance travel with mine and more trips by train with the folder.


    If you haven’t already, join the forum to reply!

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    Last edited by armyknife; 08-11-2015 at 1:14 AM. Reason: spelling mistake in thread title!
Page 27
    • knightstyle
    • By knightstyle 17th Nov 17, 7:44 PM
    • 4,850 Posts
    • 1,829 Thanks
    knightstyle
    The main problem is the lack of safe cycle routes where we live. Just looked at the sustrans map so few routes. Why not more?
    I used to cycle to work, about 5 miles direct but 18 miles on what I thought of as safe routes but now, several years later there is no way I would venture out on these roads.
    The few cycle lanes disappear as soon as the road gets unsafe.
    Look at A156 heading South from Gainsborough, nice cycle lane in places but it at one stage it seems to be on the pavement, no cycle lane and high metal fence on narrow bit under the railway. Then the lane ends with an arrow directing cyclists to turn left up a private driveway??? This is just before a couple of bends where the road narrows.
    Total chaos as this is meant to be a two way cycle lane, Obviously all the cyclists ignore it and cycle sensibly on the road.
    Almost forgot my reason for posting on here was to ask if anyone has had their bike for a long time?
    Mine is a Dawes Nomad, bought in 1974. a few modifications and rebuilt wheels but still ridable and fun if a bit heavy by todays standards.
    Last edited by knightstyle; 17-11-2017 at 7:48 PM. Reason: add a bit
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 17th Nov 17, 10:34 PM
    • 2,497 Posts
    • 1,671 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    I think it's difficult to convince anyone to invest much in cycling when a vocal portion of the general public see cycling as frivolous that gets in the way of the serious action of car driving. Recently the local city council announced they had secured a grant to improve cycle facilities in the city centre. The response unsurprisingly was profoundly negative with people complaining about money being spent on cyclists rather than improving the roads for cars with the usual comments about cyclists all being reckless law breakers, not paying road tax, not having insurance etc.

    There's been a few campaigns recently to enforce the minimum distance when overtaking cyclists which has also received a lot of negative backlash for similar reasons. Anything article I see on anything positive being done for cyclists receives a near identical reaction if it's posted somewhere general.

    In turn the lack of decent cycling facilities mean people are less inclined to cycle which means there's less incentive to produce the cycle facilities in the first place.

    My oldest bike is pretty new at six years old although the local group I cycle with are attached to a local community workshop where newer bikes are almost a little frowned on and older bikes are popular. My brother is very pleased with his bike, a 70's/80's era road bike which he bought for 30 and stripped the gears to convert it to a single speed. He spent a little more money on it sorting a bottom bracket issue and used it for commuting, he was amused by the fact his very cheap bike was fast and easy to ride in comparison to many others with new but unsuitable MTB's or similar.

    John
    • Dollyface85
    • By Dollyface85 22nd Nov 17, 11:32 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Dollyface85
    Hi all,
    I'm new here and just recently become a cyclist.
    I cycle 5 miles to and from work 6 days a week and last week signed up to the London to Brighton.
    So lovely to get ona bike, however anyone got any tips for cycling against the wind/rain?
    • MABLE
    • By MABLE 23rd Nov 17, 7:43 AM
    • 3,641 Posts
    • 1,905 Thanks
    MABLE
    Hi all,


    So lovely to get ona bike, however anyone got any tips for cycling against the wind/rain?
    Originally posted by Dollyface85
    Yes buy an electric bike.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 23rd Nov 17, 10:22 AM
    • 8,397 Posts
    • 6,171 Thanks
    esuhl
    So lovely to get ona bike, however anyone got any tips for cycling against the wind/rain?
    Originally posted by Dollyface85
    I wear a baseball cap to keep rain out of my eyes and off my head. In light rain, I have a windproof/water-resistant top. For torrential rain, I have a thin waterproof jacket to go on top.

    The trousers I wear are lightweight, quick-drying, water-repellent hiking/camping trousers.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 9th Dec 17, 7:54 PM
    • 2,497 Posts
    • 1,671 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    Hi all,
    I'm new here and just recently become a cyclist.
    I cycle 5 miles to and from work 6 days a week and last week signed up to the London to Brighton.
    So lovely to get ona bike, however anyone got any tips for cycling against the wind/rain?
    Originally posted by Dollyface85
    Having the right clothing is important as you need to strike a balance between having enough clothing to deal with the conditions but not too much either. It's surprising how much a difference small items like a head band or arm warmers can make, they can be easily carried to take on and off as required. Having too much clothing on can make it hard going as well as you get too hot, feel worn out, get sweaty and feel worse.

    The wind is tricky to deal with as it's hard, constant work and there's not really getting around that. I find it's useful to pace yourself for it as you can get a feel for the wind direction within a few minutes of setting off the have a rough idea of which way the wind is blowing and how much, if I know the route then I'll also know which sections are going to be hard going into the wind and for how long. Similar with hills, I find that's a big help because rather than it feeling like an endless slog, I know how far it is before I'm out of it.

    John
    • Cicatriz
    • By Cicatriz 15th Dec 17, 2:53 PM
    • 44 Posts
    • 147 Thanks
    Cicatriz
    The main problem is the lack of safe cycle routes where we live. Just looked at the sustrans map so few routes. Why not more?
    I used to cycle to work, about 5 miles direct but 18 miles on what I thought of as safe routes but now, several years later there is no way I would venture out on these roads.
    The few cycle lanes disappear as soon as the road gets unsafe.
    Look at A156 heading South from Gainsborough, nice cycle lane in places but it at one stage it seems to be on the pavement, no cycle lane and high metal fence on narrow bit under the railway. Then the lane ends with an arrow directing cyclists to turn left up a private driveway??? This is just before a couple of bends where the road narrows.
    Total chaos as this is meant to be a two way cycle lane, Obviously all the cyclists ignore it and cycle sensibly on the road.
    Almost forgot my reason for posting on here was to ask if anyone has had their bike for a long time?
    Mine is a Dawes Nomad, bought in 1974. a few modifications and rebuilt wheels but still ridable and fun if a bit heavy by todays standards.
    Originally posted by knightstyle
    A problem is that sustrans is a charity and therefore limited in what it can do. Another issue is the war within cycling: either segregation or non-segregation but more cycle friendly/suitable roads.

    Councils generally (albeit no always) percieve cycle lanes as a box to tick and so you get the wholly unuseful facilities that don't help any road user.



    I walk a lot, too, and have noticed that more often than I'd expect there is no feasible means of walking between two neighbouring towns as eventually you hit an A road with no footway.
    • Cicatriz
    • By Cicatriz 15th Dec 17, 3:00 PM
    • 44 Posts
    • 147 Thanks
    Cicatriz
    Hi all,
    I'm new here and just recently become a cyclist.
    I cycle 5 miles to and from work 6 days a week and last week signed up to the London to Brighton.
    So lovely to get ona bike, however anyone got any tips for cycling against the wind/rain?
    Originally posted by Dollyface85
    In addition to other comments: in cold weather, decent gloves are essential. Hands get cold much more than any other part of the body cycling.

    Generally, out of all the cycling-specific garments, gloves are the one thing I'd recommend to any new cyclist. Protection against the cold, reduce road vibration and if you ever do fall, they can protect your hand.
    • jeradon
    • By jeradon 20th Dec 17, 9:28 AM
    • 29 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    jeradon
    Our office is not far from my house so I use my bike most of the time.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 23rd Mar 18, 3:20 PM
    • 2,497 Posts
    • 1,671 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    With the clocks going forward this weekend we're finally going to get our evenings back and hopefully it's going to get a bit warmer. It's been a solid winter on the fat bike but now looking forward to getting back onto the summer bike and hopefully drier trails plus get out proper rides on the road bike.

    It's been a bit quiet on the bike side of things here, anyone got any plans for cycle events this year?
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 23rd Mar 18, 5:00 PM
    • 8,397 Posts
    • 6,171 Thanks
    esuhl
    With the clocks going forward this weekend we're finally going to get our evenings back and hopefully it's going to get a bit warmer. It's been a solid winter on the fat bike but now looking forward to getting back onto the summer bike and hopefully drier trails plus get out proper rides on the road bike.

    It's been a bit quiet on the bike side of things here, anyone got any plans for cycle events this year?
    Originally posted by Johnmcl7
    No cycle events for me, but I'm delighted to hear that it's this weekend the clocks go forward!

    I can't wait for it to get a bit warmer and brighter so it looks more tempting to jump on the bike. I really struggle through dark, cold, wet winters to find the motivation. Especially when the bike gets so muddy and needs cleaning with freezing cold water just as it's getting dark. Brrr!

    In anticipation of better weather, I've bled the brakes, cleaned the discs, adjusted the derailleurs and mech hanger, and got some new bearings to service the hubs. And I have yet another stem on order, in the hope that I will eventually get the bike to "fit" perfectly.

    I can't wait to get the last few tweaks done, and for a long sunny day to give the bike (and me!) a proper ride! Roll on summer!
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 23rd Mar 18, 5:03 PM
    • 8,397 Posts
    • 6,171 Thanks
    esuhl
    In addition to other comments: in cold weather, decent gloves are essential. Hands get cold much more than any other part of the body cycling.

    Generally, out of all the cycling-specific garments, gloves are the one thing I'd recommend to any new cyclist. Protection against the cold, reduce road vibration and if you ever do fall, they can protect your hand.
    Originally posted by Cicatriz
    True -- I always wear short-fingered gloves when I'm cycling. They're sufficient in all but the coldest weather (4 degrees or below) where your finger tips get really cold.

    I bought some full-fingered winter cycling gloves, but it's only been cold enough to wear them once or twice. And, after ten minutes of cycling, my hands just overheat no matter how cold it is.
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 23rd Mar 18, 9:16 PM
    • 5,806 Posts
    • 3,513 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    True -- I always wear short-fingered gloves when I'm cycling. They're sufficient in all but the coldest weather (4 degrees or below) where your finger tips get really cold.

    I bought some full-fingered winter cycling gloves, but it's only been cold enough to wear them once or twice. And, after ten minutes of cycling, my hands just overheat no matter how cold it is.
    Originally posted by esuhl
    I use some Northwave gloves, thin enough to not over heat but decent in rain with good grip - seem to be out of stock now though. I get cold fingers without so don't tend to use mits until late spring as I commute daily

    https://northwave.com/en/p/contact-touch-2/
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 24th Mar 18, 1:18 AM
    • 2,497 Posts
    • 1,671 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    No cycle events for me, but I'm delighted to hear that it's this weekend the clocks go forward!
    Originally posted by esuhl
    While I get on fine riding with lights I'm also looking forward to the clocks going forward and progressively moving towards no longer needing lights. They're not that much hassle to get charged and mounted but it's nice not to have to.

    I can't wait for it to get a bit warmer and brighter so it looks more tempting to jump on the bike. I really struggle through dark, cold, wet winters to find the motivation. Especially when the bike gets so muddy and needs cleaning with freezing cold water just as it's getting dark. Brrr!
    The key for me is having a great group to ride with otherwise I just wouldn't do it, even last week I wasn't in the mood for going out and was actually relieved no-one in my group seemed to want to go out. Someone posted at the last moment to go out so I got ready and joined them then had a great ride which I was glad I went out for.

    Generally the thought of going out is the hardest part but once you get out and get warmed up you don't really care how cold, wet or tough it is as it doesn't really matter and it's a liberating feeling you can being able to get out in any conditions and have a laugh.

    I just give the bike a quick wash down after each ride as the mud comes off easily while it's still wet and just dry then oil the chain. There's not much point scrubbing down the rest of the bike as it's going to be just as muddy again a few days later.

    In anticipation of better weather, I've bled the brakes, cleaned the discs, adjusted the derailleurs and mech hanger, and got some new bearings to service the hubs. And I have yet another stem on order, in the hope that I will eventually get the bike to "fit" perfectly.
    I should have been working on the summer bike as it's sat all winter doing nothing and we're now fast approaching the time it's going to be back in action. I dislike the brakes and drivetrain so meaning to change them over (even bought the brakes, they've been in the box eight months now.

    I can't wait to get the last few tweaks done, and for a long sunny day to give the bike (and me!) a proper ride! Roll on summer!
    Getting a good fit can be tricky and I regret buying a bike online because even though I'm at the top of the height range for the size, the bike's top tube is too long. I've shortened the stem and made some other adjustments but it's not quite right.

    I have hopefully corrected that problem with another new stem and umm well the rest of the bike as well:



    I said I'd never get a carbon bike but I got it at nearly half price and in my size, heavily reduced bikes are normally the really big or small sizes. Also only the carbon versions get the clever gadget on the front to isolate the vibration from the handlebars. The bike is off to a bad start as I've spent stupidly long thinking about the weight of bottle cages and to break it in, I've signed up for the Loch Ness sportive next month. Which I also said I'd never do.
    • tiredwithtwins
    • By tiredwithtwins 31st Mar 18, 8:04 PM
    • 445 Posts
    • 1,357 Thanks
    tiredwithtwins
    ive not cycled while the weather has been so horrible, so its been a good few months since ive been out ... looking forward to some better weather so my 5km to work and 5km back wont be such hard work. too many hills here, and at my age its a bit of a trial in the cold!!
    july gc - 256/240
    aug gc - 232/300
    sep gc - 198/200
    oct gc - 90/200

    wading through the treacle of life!
    • House Martin
    • By House Martin 1st Apr 18, 8:58 AM
    • 1,428 Posts
    • 1,192 Thanks
    House Martin
    While I get on fine riding with lights I'm also looking forward to the clocks going forward and progressively moving towards no longer needing lights. They're not that much hassle to get charged and mounted but it's nice not to have to.



    The key for me is having a great group to ride with otherwise I just wouldn't do it, even last week I wasn't in the mood for going out and was actually relieved no-one in my group seemed to want to go out. Someone posted at the last moment to go out so I got ready and joined them then had a great ride which I was glad I went out for.

    Generally the thought of going out is the hardest part but once you get out and get warmed up you don't really care how cold, wet or tough it is as it doesn't really matter and it's a liberating feeling you can being able to get out in any conditions and have a laugh.

    I just give the bike a quick wash down after each ride as the mud comes off easily while it's still wet and just dry then oil the chain. There's not much point scrubbing down the rest of the bike as it's going to be just as muddy again a few days later.



    I should have been working on the summer bike as it's sat all winter doing nothing and we're now fast approaching the time it's going to be back in action. I dislike the brakes and drivetrain so meaning to change them over (even bought the brakes, they've been in the box eight months now.



    Getting a good fit can be tricky and I regret buying a bike online because even though I'm at the top of the height range for the size, the bike's top tube is too long. I've shortened the stem and made some other adjustments but it's not quite right.

    I have hopefully corrected that problem with another new stem and umm well the rest of the bike as well:



    I said I'd never get a carbon bike but I got it at nearly half price and in my size, heavily reduced bikes are normally the really big or small sizes. Also only the carbon versions get the clever gadget on the front to isolate the vibration from the handlebars. The bike is off to a bad start as I've spent stupidly long thinking about the weight of bottle cages and to break it in, I've signed up for the Loch Ness sportive next month. Which I also said I'd never do.
    Originally posted by Johnmcl7
    I think you should get some advice about changing the stem. Are you trying to get the handlebars a little closer by an inch or two ?.Although that stem looks OK. I was going to get one much shorter than that to bring me a little closer to the handlebars but moving the saddle as far forward as possible has helped.
    My bike is probably not quite right for me with its frame size but I read that changing the stem to a shorter length will make the steering very skittish.
    Looks like you could squeeze an inch on the seat moving a little closer.
    Sensible flat pedals. I could nt get on with cleats and they did ntt make any difference whatsoever to me in pedalling efficiency. I will not be engaging in any eyeballs out hard sprinting or pushing hard at any time as I cruise around at 14 mph. My flat pedals were also much lighter than the cleated ones at around 250 grams a pair.
    I use my bottle cage to carry a spare inner tube so I don`t have to use a saddle bag with its extra weight.So far since I ve bought my all carbon Planet X pro carbon bike 2 years ago I have nt had a puncture.
    Just bought a new pair of Victoria Gatorskin tyres for this year hoping to go another year without a puncture
    I ll have to look into something to isolate the handlebars a little. 23mm rock hard tyres transmits every little bump from the road and after the winter we have many more potholes around now then we did last year
    Last edited by House Martin; 01-04-2018 at 9:02 AM.
    • Nasqueron
    • By Nasqueron 1st Apr 18, 1:41 PM
    • 5,806 Posts
    • 3,513 Thanks
    Nasqueron
    I think you should get some advice about changing the stem. Are you trying to get the handlebars a little closer by an inch or two ?.Although that stem looks OK. I was going to get one much shorter than that to bring me a little closer to the handlebars but moving the saddle as far forward as possible has helped.
    My bike is probably not quite right for me with its frame size but I read that changing the stem to a shorter length will make the steering very skittish.
    Looks like you could squeeze an inch on the seat moving a little closer.
    Sensible flat pedals. I could nt get on with cleats and they did ntt make any difference whatsoever to me in pedalling efficiency. I will not be engaging in any eyeballs out hard sprinting or pushing hard at any time as I cruise around at 14 mph. My flat pedals were also much lighter than the cleated ones at around 250 grams a pair.
    I use my bottle cage to carry a spare inner tube so I don`t have to use a saddle bag with its extra weight.So far since I ve bought my all carbon Planet X pro carbon bike 2 years ago I have nt had a puncture.
    Just bought a new pair of Victoria Gatorskin tyres for this year hoping to go another year without a puncture
    I ll have to look into something to isolate the handlebars a little. 23mm rock hard tyres transmits every little bump from the road and after the winter we have many more potholes around now then we did last year
    Originally posted by House Martin
    Is there really much difference in weight between a saddle bag with tools in and a plastic bottle tool kit which takes up your second drinks bottle slot? Is it really that much of an issue if you pootle around at 14mph? You can also get lighter cleat pedals if you're desperate to sheer off grammes here and there
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 1st Apr 18, 7:47 PM
    • 2,497 Posts
    • 1,671 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    I think you should get some advice about changing the stem. Are you trying to get the handlebars a little closer by an inch or two ?.Although that stem looks OK. I was going to get one much shorter than that to bring me a little closer to the handlebars but moving the saddle as far forward as possible has helped.
    My bike is probably not quite right for me with its frame size but I read that changing the stem to a shorter length will make the steering very skittish.
    Looks like you could squeeze an inch on the seat moving a little closer.
    Originally posted by House Martin
    This is the new bike

    I did shorten the stem on the other bike and it did help but the bike just felt a bit long, this one is a size down and feels a better fit but mainly bought it for the decouplers to make long rides more comfortable.

    I was concerned about making the bike more skittish but I don't think there was that much difference in reality.

    Sensible flat pedals. I could nt get on with cleats and they did ntt make any difference whatsoever to me in pedalling efficiency. I will not be engaging in any eyeballs out hard sprinting or pushing hard at any time as I cruise around at 14 mph. My flat pedals were also much lighter than the cleated ones at around 250 grams a pair.
    I was worried I'd get slaughtered for posting a picture of a decent carbon bike with flats

    I spent a couple of years with clipless trying two different systems and never liked either plus aside from disliking the feel of the system I was slower and found it harder going. I do get that many people get on well with clipless for the opposite reason as they like the feel of them but it's not for me, I've managed 10 hour cycles fine on flats.

    I carry a little backpack which has been one of my best purchases, it sits high up and although very small it can pack in a reasonable mount of items. Aside from a few maintenance bits and pieces I particularly like being able to carry different layers as even over a short distance conditions can change a lot. Being able to take a jacket off or on, change arm warmers etc. makes a real difference for me.

    I gave the new bike a go today and was initially disappointed the decouplers didn't have as much effect as I thought they would but it makes a big difference especially being able to carry speed over rough roads. The biggest surprise was when getting off there wasn't the usual buzz in my arms or legs as I'm used to with the road bike.

    Just wish it would warm up a bit as I've got to get some big rides in before the end of the month as I've foolishly signed up for a 70 mile sportive. I've done the route and can do the distance but need to get my speed up.
    Last edited by Johnmcl7; 01-04-2018 at 7:49 PM.
    • Johnmcl7
    • By Johnmcl7 11th Apr 18, 12:22 AM
    • 2,497 Posts
    • 1,671 Thanks
    Johnmcl7
    After a short ride on the new bike I found the seat was awful so headed down to the LBS to pick a new seat as they had a 30% off sale. Irritatingly they had every size of the seat I wanted apart from the one I needed (even got my bum measured to check the size) but picked another one, went to buy it to find not only was the 30% off sticker on it and I assume every other seat no longer applicable but it had even gone up in price from the one printed on it.

    If it was a seat I really wanted I would have pushed for the reduced price but decided instead to swap the seat over from the other road bike instead until I sort out another seat. I decided to properly break the bike in and fired into a 110 mile ride for which I badly overestimated my fitness and how much I needed to eat so died on the main hill climb around halfway through.

    Stuck with it and was yet again rewarded with a weather forecast that was completely wrong so with around 40 miles to go the rain that wasn't coming started coming down heavier and heavier so by the time I was around 20 miles from home the roads were absolutely soaking and I was pretty cold and wet. The bike is looking a fair mess as well but I was stubborn and had to do it, on the plus side no knee or seat issues so the bike is all good.



    The next day a local group were doing a social ride on a route I hadn't done, they've had their funding cut and are needing volunteers to take the rides instead so thought I'd better join them. Much better weather and good turn out as well:

    • House Martin
    • By House Martin 11th Apr 18, 9:47 PM
    • 1,428 Posts
    • 1,192 Thanks
    House Martin
    Well done for attempting 110 miles in a day. That is well out of my range now at my age. Excellent scenery photos I might add
    I managed 30 miles the other day, only my 4 th bike ride of the year since the weather warmed up,
    I m trying to get up to around managing 50 miles so I can join a local bike group who go out on Saturdays and do between 50 to 70 miles.
    Like you I can feel every bump in the roads .Rock hard narrow 23mm tyres don t help.
    I m trying something I used to do back in the 1980 s when I used to do long European bike tours on my own. From my house to Greece ( and a tour of Crete ) was my furthest tour where I averaged around 100 miles a day on my Jack Taylor Tour of Britain bike loaded with rear panniers and lightweight camping gear. Those days are over now.
    Today I found an old camping mat and cut a 6 inch by 5 inch length and wrapped it around the top bars and taped it, to makes the bars thicker but supremely comfy and hopefully will help with all the micro buzzy vibrations which come through the bars on long runs
    .I ll see how it go s .May try a sorbothane bar tape if this sponge camping mat does nt work.
    Reviews on seat posts say that that carbon fibre post is more comfy than than the usual alloy ones.
    Has anyone got any recommendation on a carbon post which is nt too expensive ?.
    The Chinese Ebay ones are around 12 to 15 and are probably plastic ones which could snap easily . Branded ones can be up to over 300 for the superlight ones.
    I m using the Planet X saddle which came with the bike, a Pro Carbon model and looking into something a little more comfy myself. Any recommendations for light weight ones.
    I still have my old, now knackered , Brooks Professional leather saddle which is unbeatable for comfort. Greg Lemond used one winning the Tour De France.
    Last edited by House Martin; 12-04-2018 at 8:37 AM.
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