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  • FIRST POST
    • zippychick
    • By zippychick 26th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    • 9,343Posts
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    zippychick
    Preparing for Winter V
    • #1
    • 26th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    Preparing for Winter V 26th Nov 14 at 11:48 AM

    Official MoneySavingExpert.com Insert:

    If you've come through to this discussion from this week's email, welcome to the MSE Forum. You've joined our Old Style MoneySaving forumites chatting about how to prepare for winter.

    Read below, read the last few pages of the discussion to see their most recent posts and click "reply" to join in. If you haven’t already joined join the forum to reply.

    Back to zippychick's original post...

    -----

    Hi everyone,

    As the last 'preparing for winter' thread has now grown quite long, I think it's time for a new one, and what better time of year to begin to prepare than the end of November

    So here goes....a shiny new thread. Please post below all your preparations for winter. If you want to read through the tips on the older threads you can find them here:

    Preparing for Winter

    Preparing for winter II

    Preparing for winter III

    Preparing for winter IV

    Other links that may help:

    the ice man cometh! (merged with keeping warm)

    Things that worked or didn't work last winter

    Frugal but happy in winter?

    Winter checklist

    Lets hope it's a good one for all of us.

    Zip



    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 11-10-2017 at 1:35 PM.
    A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men
    Norn Iron club member #380

Page 126
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 13th Jul 18, 11:16 PM
    • 182 Posts
    • 1,322 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    Our winter duvet has gone in for cleaning

    I'm starting to look at my two new autumn-winter skirts that I'm making, considering cutting diagrams and designs and feeling excited...

    The blackberries are starting to ripen, too...
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 21st Jul 18, 6:01 PM
    • 182 Posts
    • 1,322 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    There are still WEEKS of summer yet to go - but I think my mind is saying: "right, well that's 6-8 weeks of vest-and-shorts weather, and all the plants look tired and half-dead and dried-out - it must be the end of summer now!"

    I *feel* like it's autumn!!
    • LadyhavershamLost
    • By LadyhavershamLost 21st Jul 18, 6:12 PM
    • 47 Posts
    • 278 Thanks
    LadyhavershamLost
    I was out for a walk with my tiniest child and we found a patch of very ripe blackberries - seems far too early.....very nice they were too!


    We have sounded out a few apple trees in the locality that I were unaware of as well
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 23rd Jul 18, 9:26 AM
    • 1,969 Posts
    • 13,317 Thanks
    Wednesday2000
    A friend who trained as a butler (!) told me that the vacuum bags are really bad for long-term storage as they break the fibres and leave permanent creases and can lead to tears along the crease-lines; also, they aren't actually air-tight so don't protect against moth-eggs hatching, if moths are a problem, and they also won't keep out mould, but will actively encourage it

    He enlightened me on that little lot just after I'd bought four vacuum-storage bags, bah humbug!
    Originally posted by Laura_Elsewhere
    That happened to me! I was horrified to find mould all over the stuff I had stored in the vacuum bags I had bought. It was disgusting!
    2018: Simplify your life
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 23rd Jul 18, 9:38 AM
    • 8,404 Posts
    • 29,530 Thanks
    Primrose
    I have three blackberry bushes in our garden. I fear there will be few blackberries this autumn to mix in with my other soft fruit compotes as all the forming berries are just brown shrivelled up little blobs, even though I've been trying to spare a little grey kitchen water for them.


    it's going to be a hard winter for the birds because many of the berries on trees and shrubs won't be forming properly either for the same reason. I think the consequences of this very dry summer are going to be felt for many months into the future, not only for wildlife, but reflected in the prices of agricultural goods in the shops.
    • downshifter
    • By downshifter 23rd Jul 18, 10:03 AM
    • 1,073 Posts
    • 1,885 Thanks
    downshifter
    Farmers round here (Peak Park) have been feeding their animals for a while as the fields are bare. Price of meat/milk will soar next year, as will lots of other stuff. We'll be importing like mad!

    Feel so sorry for the sheep, they look pretty fed up.
    • smeeth
    • By smeeth 29th Jul 18, 1:04 PM
    • 539 Posts
    • 5,231 Thanks
    smeeth
    Finally a cool, grey, wet day.
    Amazed by how much it improved my mood!
    Anchor yourself to the foundations of everything you love.

    Thank you to all those who post competitions!
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 29th Jul 18, 2:49 PM
    • 8,404 Posts
    • 29,530 Thanks
    Primrose
    I expect the vegetation and wildlife are gasping with relief but the temperature contrast today has seemed so great that I,ve had to put on a sweeter Suddenlyn myself grumbling about feeling chilly. Truly some people are never happy !

    On a more positive note, I think the level in our water butts has probably increased by a massive one inch! Sone days We have to be thankful for small mercies!
    • Cheapskate
    • By Cheapskate 30th Jul 18, 8:57 AM
    • 1,631 Posts
    • 19,916 Thanks
    Cheapskate
    For all it's stonkingly hot here, I feel like I should be starting winter preps - maybe it's because all my fruit trees are going to be ready far earlier than last year, and I'm itching to harvest and cook/freeze them!

    When the temp drops a little, I'll be crocheting more blankets for beds, sofas, and in the car, and slowly building wood and coal stocks for the stove. Also looking for a second slow cooker and a few bits of winter clothing for us all, so tootling around various online and RL life sales.

    A xx
    Originally posted by Cheapskate
    I harvested most of the eating apples on Friday, due to the forecasted rain and wind, and due to the fact that most of them were ripe - and it's not even August yet!! Plums were safe in the weather, just a few blown off, but they'll be ready in the next week or two, too!

    Going to sort out my wool stash this week, and then I can begin the crocheting for winter. Even if it's not a harsh one, I feel that energy prices are going to rocket, so I want to have plenty of soft and warm things around as a hedge against using the CH. Also going to start buying coal and a bit of wood, next week will take the littlies chumping for kindling in the woods near us, it will have dried again from recent rain.

    Going to take my duvet for cleaning next week, and check out all our bedding - littlies need new pillows and sheets, we need a new flannelette one, too, but that's all. HWBs need replacing, but we're all ok for woollies - just need to find 'em all and organise in one place!

    A xo
    Oct GC 320~/300

    Nov GC 4/300
    • Laura_Elsewhere
    • By Laura_Elsewhere 30th Jul 18, 5:09 PM
    • 182 Posts
    • 1,322 Thanks
    Laura_Elsewhere
    We collected our winter duvet the other day from cleaning, and I agree - prices for everything are going to go up, between the cold weather, the hot weather and the political stuff. The more leeway we have, the more choices and options, the better, so yes, I agree with having soft, cosy, warm things around!

    I want to get our pillows washed before the hot weather goes, so will probably do that later this week.
    • fuddle
    • By fuddle 1st Aug 18, 2:06 PM
    • 6,597 Posts
    • 101,084 Thanks
    fuddle
    Yes, keep the fire in during really cold spells. It warms the bricks and the stone walls and really makes a huge difference.
    Originally posted by mardatha
    I will be doing this during really cold spells. I'll switch to the ovals and keep it going overnight. I dabbled last year and found that the ambient heat from the stove was enough to keep the chill from the fabric of the living room. What I need to learn is how to relight the almost ash ovals.

    It's Aug1st and the start of the slippery slope to Autumn. My thoughts are focused on winter prep now.

    It's a return to actual physical saving pots again for us. I haven't budgeted like this for a while but I feel I need to have access to monetary funds when I need them and I'm likely to need them in an emergency situation.

    I'm also keeping a close eye on the gas and electricity usage again. I pay by direct debit and got it within 13 for electricity and 25 gas last April to April. The last thing I want is accrue a large debt with energy companies. Our usage also needs tightening up. The wood store is full and already saving for the refills so I'm hoping to keep it topped up this season while accruing credit with the gas for next season's refill.

    I've already knit a chunky snood (asthmatic and dodgy winter chest so wanted something that naturally sits proud of my mouth and nose). I have a pair of socks knitted too. I'm switching to crochet for the next socks as I can 'knock 'em up' faster. crochet comes easy to me. I'm bringing the 2nd wool blanket down for sofa sitting and plan to replace with a granny square blanket for the bedroom.

    Food stocks are ongoing and going well. I'm tempted to put youngest DD back on school meals. They have increased by only 5p per day and much better value for money than I can get via supermarket price hikes.

    I have my winter veg planted in any spare patch I can get and have 2 pumpkins, 2 jack be little, 3 spaghetti squash, 2 turks turban, 3 festival and hoping for more to pollinate. I hope all goes well with growing and curing so I can store and make use in stews.
    The biggest maincrop potatoes are going to be batch jacketed in the oven and frozen as emergency meal ideas.

    We're 'redoing' the bathroom. It will consist of panelling the walls for insulation type benefit and we'll also be lining the toilet cistern internally to stop the cold water/warm atmosphere producing condensation on the cistern and that then dripping on the floor/attracting mould spores on the wall behind.

    We're also planning on assembling, at some point, a chicken run on the allotment. I need to buy an other tarpaulin to wrap the other side of the shed so water won't penetrate.

    I also need to be mindful that our boiler is 14 years old and funds need to be accessible for that.

    I just need new vests for the girls and DH needs another thermal work top. I can layer up with old summer stuff/last years autumn stuff but I am looking to transition from jeans wearer to skirts and thermal tights wearer.

    I'm going to refresh the medicine cupboard and buy online pain killers and flu preparations, first aid stocks etc. I won't bother with cough mixtures though and look to buy a manuka honey for dire circumstances.

    I need change in the house for bus fayre to enable me to get to the doctors if a cold turns to my chest and I'm at risk of serious infection again. Not only am I worried about pneumonia this season but it's highly likely that infection had me develop heart failure and some heart damage. I think I may be obsessive with antibacterial this coming season. I need more thyme for tea making when colds come on, want to pick elderberries for the syrup and have dried berries as back up to make into new stock. I've asked for essential oils for my birthday that are heavily for lung health so I should be covered in that respect.

    I think I have flooded you all with my winter prep thoughts.

    Today is Lammas and for those of us who're connected to the earth have a blessed Lammas, marking the start of the harvest season. I'm off to go make some Lammas bread to eat with our broth later.
    Last edited by fuddle; 01-08-2018 at 2:09 PM.
    Be like a tree.
    Stay grounded. Connect with your roots. Turn over a new leaf.
    Bend before you break. Enjoy your natural beauty. Keep growing.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 1st Aug 18, 5:04 PM
    • 15,283 Posts
    • 148,505 Thanks
    mardatha
    Fuddle - will you tell me how you do this?
    "we'll also be lining the toilet cistern internally to stop the cold water/warm atmosphere producing condensation on the cistern"
    because this happens here, the cistern is continually dropping onto the floor.
    • fuddle
    • By fuddle 1st Aug 18, 5:25 PM
    • 6,597 Posts
    • 101,084 Thanks
    fuddle
    Mar DH is going to empty the cistern of water, dry it out, then line, glue and seal a yoga mat around the inside casing. We saw it on youtube, loadsa vids mar. HTH
    Be like a tree.
    Stay grounded. Connect with your roots. Turn over a new leaf.
    Bend before you break. Enjoy your natural beauty. Keep growing.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 1st Aug 18, 5:53 PM
    • 15,283 Posts
    • 148,505 Thanks
    mardatha
    Oh hell, the RV won't do that.. I'll look into things that can be done from outside. Thanks fudds.
    • Cheapskate
    • By Cheapskate 1st Aug 18, 6:23 PM
    • 1,631 Posts
    • 19,916 Thanks
    Cheapskate
    Fuddle, I use ovals in my stove, and found that if it was banked up well overnight, I could add paper rubbish, kindling, and a firelighter in the morning, it ignited well on its own, then I added a bit more wood and more coals - 5 minute job. DH didn't believe it would be as efficient as it is - our 2 downstairs rooms are now only divided by folding doors, but the stove alone keeps the entire space comfortable without radiators. The chimney breast and the stove radiate heat even when the fire's almost out.

    I sent my meter readings online the other day, and we're now only 30-odd in debit between both fuels (spent a bit early spring!), so definitely going back to more slow cooker meals, using the stove more, etc., when it starts to cool down, to save on energy costs.

    Our school dinners are now 2.12 a day, so over 21 for a week for both! Ours will be on pack ups in September, can't afford that! I've gone back to physical pots of savings, too, always done it towards Christmas, etc., but now I find I'm doing it most of the year, and it's been invaluable so many times.

    I'm going to grow some herbs in pots to use over autumn/winter, and some micro-greens, to help add some variety to what may well be some very plain meals if money gets any tighter!

    A xo
    Oct GC 320~/300

    Nov GC 4/300
    • fuddle
    • By fuddle 1st Aug 18, 6:28 PM
    • 6,597 Posts
    • 101,084 Thanks
    fuddle
    Mar we spent all last winter with a towel wrapped round the cistern. It looked an eye saw but was 95% better than without it. Get your knitting needles out and make a cistern cosy, doll body optional

    Thanks cheaps, i'll definitely have a play.
    Last edited by fuddle; 01-08-2018 at 6:34 PM.
    Be like a tree.
    Stay grounded. Connect with your roots. Turn over a new leaf.
    Bend before you break. Enjoy your natural beauty. Keep growing.
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 1st Aug 18, 6:32 PM
    • 12,804 Posts
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    Alfalfa seed sprouts really well in a jam jar on window sill. Just cover the top with a piece of cloth secured with a rubber band, I use a piece of the look alike J cloths as it's easy to tip out the rinsing water, rinse the seeds twice a day, just put the material on the jar against tap and turn on gently, swish the seeds and empty out the water. In 4 to 5 days you have some really nice sprouted seeds just showing green tips of leaves, crunch, full of vitamins and very easy to do regularly. The girls called it 'tickly salad' when they were little as it's curly! old fashioned mustard and cress grown on a piece of kitchen paper in a shallow container on the window sill also works a treat and the seeds are 50p a packet in Wilkos, you buy a packet of mustard seed and a packet of cress seed and mix them together in a jar. I tablespoon of alfalfa seed will give a jar of sprouts and a sprinkling of mustard and cress seed over the kitchen paper will give you a container of cress. Good way of cheap vitamins in the winter months.
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Cheapskate
    • By Cheapskate 1st Aug 18, 6:35 PM
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    Cheapskate
    Ooh, I'd forgotten all about alfalfa seeds, Lyn, thank you for the reminder! . Where to buy nowadays, though?
    Oct GC 320~/300

    Nov GC 4/300
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 1st Aug 18, 6:38 PM
    • 12,804 Posts
    • 176,994 Thanks
    MrsLurcherwalker
    Health food shops/whole food shops/ online and a 125gram bag will last absolutely ages. You might even find them in a packet on a seed stand in the local garden centre and if they don't have them it's worth asking if they can get some for you, ask and if they say no you're no worse off are you?
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Cheapskate
    • By Cheapskate 1st Aug 18, 6:42 PM
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    Cheapskate
    Fab, thanks! That's going on my to-do list for next week x

    A xo
    Oct GC 320~/300

    Nov GC 4/300
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