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  • FIRST POST
    • zippychick
    • By zippychick 26th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
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    zippychick
    Preparing for Winter V
    • #1
    • 26th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    Preparing for Winter V 26th Nov 14 at 11:48 AM

    Official MoneySavingExpert.com Insert:

    If you've come through to this discussion from this week's email, welcome to the MSE Forum. You've joined our Old Style MoneySaving forumites chatting about how to prepare for winter.

    Read below, read the last few pages of the discussion to see their most recent posts and click "reply" to join in. If you haven!!!8217;t already joined join the forum to reply.

    Back to zippychick's original post...

    -----

    Hi everyone,

    As the last 'preparing for winter' thread has now grown quite long, I think it's time for a new one, and what better time of year to begin to prepare than the end of November

    So here goes....a shiny new thread. Please post below all your preparations for winter. If you want to read through the tips on the older threads you can find them here:

    Preparing for Winter

    Preparing for winter II

    Preparing for winter III

    Preparing for winter IV

    Other links that may help:

    the ice man cometh! (merged with keeping warm)

    Things that worked or didn't work last winter

    Frugal but happy in winter?

    Winter checklist

    Lets hope it's a good one for all of us.

    Zip



    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 11-10-2017 at 1:35 PM.
    A little nonsense now and then is relished by the wisest men
    Norn Iron club member #380

Page 121
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 11th Mar 18, 2:43 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    Yes, we've a bedroom earmarked as a study?store room so we should be OK!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 11th Mar 18, 2:51 PM
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    Primrose
    I think an emergency food storage capacity is essential in winter for those who are likely to be snowed in or unable to get out because of illness and even if there isnt room in kitchen cupboards one can always have one of those deep polythene storage boxes with lids stored in a living area and covered with a decorative cover and a vase on it so it doesnt betray its real purpose.

    Many years ago I visited an elderly couples flat in Moscow at a time when food was short and people had to queue hours for everything. The flats were tiny but the wife proudly showed my her wooden chest covered with a decorative Russian cloth in which she stored any tins and dry goods she could lay her hands on. They didn,t have see through polythene storage facilities in those days and even if they did, I suspect they would have been covered with cloths or blankets so that prying neighbours couldn,t see what foodstocks you had in case they were continually trying to trying to cadge or borrow them.
    Last edited by Primrose; 11-03-2018 at 2:56 PM.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 11th Mar 18, 3:25 PM
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    mardatha
    I bet they'd be far ahead of us in commonsense and being prepared for anything Primrose.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 11th Mar 18, 3:45 PM
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    Primrose
    Well their choice of foods s were very limited at that time. We sent them various food parcels which amazed them because they had no idea what some of the foods were or how to eat them. Multi coloured pasta spirals were a complete mystery to them and as for Marmite and Bovril - they couldn,t figure out whether the B ritish actually ate it or used it for axis grease! It was humbling how valued the foods were. I managed to include a tin of olive oil which I think they eked out for about three years and tins of meat and fish were treated like gold dust.

    This was exactly how my mum reacted when Canadian relatives sent us food parcels during the war. It was like Christmas, Easter and your birthday all rolled into one ! One Canadian relative was so worried food would be stolen out of the parcels she used white cotton sheeting instead of brown paper to wrap the parcels and actually stitched it in place. It took my mum hours to unwrap it using a carefully handled razor blade cutting the seams stitch by stitch. She then washed the sheet and used it for mending holes in our bed linen because that too was on rationing and coupons and had become ragged and worn out.
    Last edited by Primrose; 11-03-2018 at 3:47 PM.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 11th Mar 18, 3:59 PM
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    mardatha
    We don't know how easy we have it eh!
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 11th Mar 18, 10:40 PM
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    JackieO
    Indeed we don't mardatha, my late Mum's sister lived in New Jersey and would send us food parcels and, cram the odd spaces in beteen the items with things like stockings for my Mum, and she would treat these like gold dust and they were carefully worn and washed and dried indoors in case anyone saw them on the line and pinched them

    Once in one parcel we had some tiny tins of Heinz baby food and I was about 4-5 by then and there were tins of apple sauce which we ended up spreading on toast like jam. One parcel has a lovely green velvet dress with a white lacy front which I adored and it was so beautiful and I had never sen anything so nice it has white pearl buttons all down each side of the white lace and when I eventually grew out of it my Mum let me have some of the odd bits that she didn't use for me to dress my doll with.

    My doll had been rescued from a bomb site and had one arm,leg and eye but I loved her because she was mine and special.I made little pyjamas with one leg in them for her and also made a white lacy patch for her missing eye. She was a bit battered about and my Mum hated me having it as she knew what had probably happened to her original owner but no one else had such a unique dolly and my Molly

    Everything was used again and again and nothing was binned or wasted at all. I think my late Mums generation were the original recyclers as the thought of throwing something away would have been scandalous.

    Everything was saved and reused as much as possible and I don't think there were the amount of landfill sites around like today .scrap went to the rag ''n'bone mans and even then you usually got a goldfish in a jam jar in return and when the goldfish went the way of most of them the jar was saved and put to good use.

    Even the ash from the coal fire was used in the garden as fertilisers and dug in. Sheets were turned sides to middle, and wool from outgrown jumpers was unpicked washed and reknitted into something else

    By the time I was 10 I could knit a pair of sock for my brothers no problem, and when as they did they had holes in, if they were darnable then Mum or I darned them.

    If not then they were inravelled and reknitted again

    We had a pillow case that Mum kept her wool in for reknitting.Today I will happily buy tiny cardi's from a bootsales for 20p or so, take them home and unpick,wash and reknit into my baby blankets, especially white DK wool as its often £1.50 odd for a ball in the shops .

    So much stuff is wasted today its no wonder we are running out of landfill sites to dump stuff in.

    JackieO xx
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus. 2018
    Running total for four months food only shopping =£126.24.Freezer stuff slowly going down at last May totals £31.11 June spends so far £18.90, brought a few odds and ends home from my holiday and using those up first.
    • kittie
    • By kittie 12th Mar 18, 5:09 AM
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    kittie
    unpicked curly wool, wrapped around two open arms then wetted and hung over the back of a chair, a weight tied onto the damp wool so it dried straighter. We had one small metal bin with a lid, for 9 of us and for us that included ashes because we had no garden but the bin was collected weekly. Nothing was wasted
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 12th Mar 18, 7:17 AM
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    JackieO
    That was why the bin men were called dustmen as they collected the ashes unused from peoples fire places. Yes getting the kinks out of curly wool and oh how you arems ached at times while your Mum was winding it
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus. 2018
    Running total for four months food only shopping =£126.24.Freezer stuff slowly going down at last May totals £31.11 June spends so far £18.90, brought a few odds and ends home from my holiday and using those up first.
    • skintmumof3
    • By skintmumof3 13th Mar 18, 11:53 AM
    • 770 Posts
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    skintmumof3
    Winter is forecast to return at the weekend down here in the south...snow and temps of -3c according to the met office ..brrr....will have to dig out my winter jumpers ..........
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 13th Mar 18, 12:33 PM
    • 1,814 Posts
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    Wednesday2000
    There is meant to be light snow here this weekend! It's supposed to be Spring.

    I'm glad I ordered some flannel sheets and flannel shirts today! They should keep me toasty warm.
    2018: Simplify your life
    Books Read 24/60
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 13th Mar 18, 1:07 PM
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    mardatha
    Whole of the east side of the UK getting it I think. But it's only March, it happens here, so I'm not getting meself into a state. Just impatient to get into the garden but up here that won't be until mid-April at least.
    • westcoastscot
    • By westcoastscot 13th Mar 18, 4:53 PM
    • 1,385 Posts
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    westcoastscot
    We've had three lovely days, but heavy frosts overnight.
    May is spring here, so plenty of time for winter yet
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 13th Mar 18, 8:10 PM
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    • 142,418 Thanks
    mardatha
    A farmer up north on the Scottish weather forum says he runs the farm on the basis of a 7 month winter here WCS.
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 14th Mar 18, 8:33 AM
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    JackieO
    I know we are due some more chilly weather but today in Kent it's sunny and warm and I shall make to most of the odd warm day to appreciate the sun and the flowers coming up in the garden.

    Not been too windy here as yet, so hopefully the spring will soon be here, and I am optimistic for any sun we get .

    Carpe Diem is my motto, and today the sun is out, the sky is blue, and so if its cold tomorrow so what, today is for enjoying (I still won't pack away the winter stuff just yet though )

    JackieO xx
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus. 2018
    Running total for four months food only shopping =£126.24.Freezer stuff slowly going down at last May totals £31.11 June spends so far £18.90, brought a few odds and ends home from my holiday and using those up first.
    • kittie
    • By kittie 18th Mar 18, 9:59 AM
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    kittie
    I boosted the house warmth this morning so have caught up with my washing too and a full set of bedding plus a few bits and bobs are now hanging to dry in the `hot` utility room, the humidity sensor will be working overtime but I reckon I will be able to get the clean bedding back on for bedtime
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 18th Mar 18, 10:34 AM
    • 8,056 Posts
    • 28,165 Thanks
    Primrose
    I boosted the house warmth this morning so have caught up with my washing too and a full set of bedding plus a few bits and bobs are now hanging to dry in the `hot` utility room, the humidity sensor will be working overtime but I reckon I will be able to get the clean bedding back on for bedtime
    Originally posted by kittie

    I hate using my tumbler drier for bed linen and often drape it over the radiators in winter to dry it. I've even been known to "iron sheets" dry if there's a particular pair of sheets I've wanted to get back on the bed the same day. It's amazing how much moisture a hot iron can remove from cotton & poly cotton sheets quite quickly !
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 18th Mar 18, 11:16 AM
    • 1,814 Posts
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    Wednesday2000
    I woke up cold last night, I had to get the faux fur blanket out of the chest of drawers to put on top of me and I felt much better after that.
    2018: Simplify your life
    Books Read 24/60
    • THIRZAH
    • By THIRZAH 18th Mar 18, 11:51 AM
    • 1,361 Posts
    • 6,770 Thanks
    THIRZAH
    DH and I were chatting about the winter of 1962-3. He was at boarding school and can remember wearing short trousers and socks in the winter. I pointed out that girls had to wear skirts and socks so were just as cold. He asked how old I was when I stopped wearing long socks for school. It was a long time ago but I'm pretty sure we wore socks right up to the sixth form-tights were too expensive to wear every day and used to get caught on the wooden desks and ladder.

    Lots of snow overnight here. The pavements are clear in places then a couple of yards further along there's a four foot high drift. We were walking along the road but had to get out of the way to let the snow plough through. There are abandoned cars everywhere and all the Pennine routes are closed. The paper shop is shut as no papers but Tesco did have plenty of milk.
    • mardatha
    • By mardatha 18th Mar 18, 1:02 PM
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    mardatha
    Heavy continuous snow here all day, and through last night. Not going to get my Sainsbugs delivery again I think. RV and neighbours out shovelling the road but as fast as they move it, more falls on them. Hills and fields white and about 5 ins lying, starting to drift now.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 18th Mar 18, 1:30 PM
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    Primrose
    More snow here again in the night. I feel so thankful that now I’m retired I no longer have to face the anxiety of going to bed at night worrying how I’m going to face the anxiety of a morning’s commute to work in nightmare conditions, and really feel for those who are still on this this treadmill.

    Today we have marooned ourselves indoor for fear of going outside, slipping and breaking a limb. . Our faithful newspaper deliverer still arrived at 7 am (he’s a pensioner too !) so its a quiet day with the paper, a book and sipping a glass of wine while waiting for our lunch to cook .

    Sometimes you just have to sit back and try to enjoy life from a different angle when circumstances are thrust on you.

    Even with my arthritic joints I would rather be outdoors sowing some spring vegetables but as this is not to be, I shall seize the moment and contemplate that the alternative option which has been thrust on me still has some enjoyable blessings. Sometimes being forced to slow down and recognise them is not a bad thing!
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