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  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Rebecca
    • By Former MSE Rebecca 11th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    • 113Posts
    • 96Thanks
    Former MSE Rebecca
    It's aitch not haitch
    • #1
    • 11th Nov 14, 11:48 AM
    It's aitch not haitch 11th Nov 14 at 11:48 AM
    Does it drive you up the wall when people 'literally' die laughing? Or how about those who give 110%?



    Check out Martin's top 10 list for word pedants

    Hit "reply" to add yours!

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 06-10-2017 at 1:02 PM.
Page 35
    • Jackmydad
    • By Jackmydad 7th Mar 18, 1:13 PM
    • 2,494 Posts
    • 7,450 Thanks
    Jackmydad
    Seen on a reality TV programme yesterday.
    A handwritten list of jobs that were to be done.
    One job was
    "Bombfire" . . .
    "Luck happens where hard work meets opportunity"
    • Sleazy
    • By Sleazy 7th Mar 18, 7:44 PM
    • 8,610 Posts
    • 14,140 Thanks
    Sleazy
    Seen on a reality TV programme yesterday.
    A handwritten list of jobs that were to be done.
    One job was
    "Bombfire" . . .
    Originally posted by Jackmydad
    Not surprising really ........

    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/11/05/bonfire-night-bombfire_n_2076787.html
    Sleazy
    In Vino Veritas, In Aqua Sanitas
    • purpoise
    • By purpoise 17th Mar 18, 2:22 PM
    • 93 Posts
    • 139 Thanks
    purpoise
    "There is," followed by a plural.
    Am I the only one to notice that many people say "There is...." and then follow it with a plural noun.
    For example, "There is lots of reasons why....."

    BTW I just heard Anita Anand on R4's "Any Answers" saying, "I never done that."
    What is the world coming to?
    • NaughtiusMaximus
    • By NaughtiusMaximus 20th Mar 18, 8:10 AM
    • 705 Posts
    • 1,682 Thanks
    NaughtiusMaximus
    Does anyone else find the increasing use of the term train station instead of railway station slightly annoying or is it just me?
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 20th Mar 18, 8:37 AM
    • 34,954 Posts
    • 129,775 Thanks
    Pyxis
    Does anyone else find the increasing use of the term train station instead of railway station slightly annoying or is it just me?
    Originally posted by NaughtiusMaximus
    I don't think I've noticed that as such.
    I don't find it particularly annoying, although I do know that the cognoscenti find the word 'train' used for the locomotive itself, (as opposed to the train of carriages), offensive.

    I used to find it peculiar that guards on trains started referring to 'the next station stop' instead of just 'the next station'. I understood the reason why, but it just seemed superfluous to add 'stop'. After all, would the guard be announcing a station that we were not going to be stopping at?

    I know you can get bus stations as well as railway stations, but growing up and beyond, a 'station' was, and still is to me, a railway station. If one meant a bus station, then that was specified.

    Just trying to think whether I've ever used the term 'train station' or not, but I can't remember.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 22nd Mar 18, 2:53 PM
    • 1,773 Posts
    • 9,458 Thanks
    NBLondon
    M'wife finds it annoying - perhaps a bit childish. Me - not so bothered. I wonder if it depends on when/where you grew up. I grew up in a Northern City where it was just the station - because the omnibus and railway terminii were adjacent. She grew up in London - where you might have a "Tube station", a "bus station" and a "train station" in the same district but all separate.

    As for "station stop" - yesterday East Midlands Trains told me Leicester was the next "station call" I can see there might be a distinction for staff between the next station to be passed through and the next station to be stopped at but for the passengers - you're right.
    Womble #7 - Running Total £9.68 $1.99 Ä3.35 S//0.10 (that's supposed to be 10 Ukrainian kopiyki but the site is refusing to display the symbol) Bds$0.10 A$0.05 C$0.88 S$0.20 zl0.02 (Polish grosze) LB0.22 (Bulgarian stotinka) ISKr 5 DKr 0.50 CHF 0.50
    • Cloth of Gold
    • By Cloth of Gold 10th Apr 18, 11:35 PM
    • 160 Posts
    • 556 Thanks
    Cloth of Gold
    'Station stop' annoys me too but it seems to be falling out of favour (or 'favor' as doubtless people will spell it before long.)

    An Americanism that has taken hold in the last two or three years is using the word 'turns' when talking about someone's age. Instead of saying 'Bill will be 50 in June', they say 'Bill turns 50 in June'. On the subject of Americanisms, I'm also fed up of hearing 'you guys' as in 'come on you guys, let's go to the mall' or just plain 'guy' as in 'this guy told me...'

    As I'm in full grump mode I'll also add that starting sentences with 'so' is another fairly recent annoyance, as is using the word 'source' as a verb, as in 'we've sourced some nice chops for supper'. What's wrong with 'bought', which is what is normally meant when 'sourced' is used? 'Showcase' is another word that I'm tired of hearing. Why are people so unimaginative in their use of vocabulary and just keep on parroting these hackneyed words and phrases? Finally (for now!) why have people started using 'gift' as a verb, as in 'I gifted her a book for her birthday'? I cringe every time I hear it.

    I hope, though, that I can be less grumpy about these things going forward.
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 11th Apr 18, 7:57 AM
    • 34,954 Posts
    • 129,775 Thanks
    Pyxis
    I think we've had this before, but I really cringe at the way that Maths is being used more and more in the 'singular', as in " I've done the math, and the numbers don't add up".

    Cringe, cringe, cringe.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
    • NBLondon
    • By NBLondon 11th Apr 18, 9:48 AM
    • 1,773 Posts
    • 9,458 Thanks
    NBLondon
    as is using the word 'source' as a verb, as in 'we've sourced some nice chops for supper'. What's wrong with 'bought', which is what is normally meant when 'sourced' is used?
    Originally posted by Cloth of Gold
    Business-speak. Sourced just means "found a way of getting some" - which could mean "found someone selling it and bought some" or "found someone who sells it - are we OK with their price?" or "found someone who can do the job but there's a trade-off of X"
    I gifted her a book
    Slightly more specific I guess... I gave her a book just means the book was transferred; I gifted her a book means it was definitely a gift and not a loan. But "I gave her a book as a birthday present" is quite adequate.
    Womble #7 - Running Total £9.68 $1.99 Ä3.35 S//0.10 (that's supposed to be 10 Ukrainian kopiyki but the site is refusing to display the symbol) Bds$0.10 A$0.05 C$0.88 S$0.20 zl0.02 (Polish grosze) LB0.22 (Bulgarian stotinka) ISKr 5 DKr 0.50 CHF 0.50
    • JimmyTheWig
    • By JimmyTheWig 11th Apr 18, 9:53 AM
    • 11,624 Posts
    • 11,233 Thanks
    JimmyTheWig
    There was a really complicated warning about a footpath I use that's going to be closed next week. So complicated, in fact, they called it an "Advanced Warning".
    (I presume that's what they meant...)
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 11th Apr 18, 4:36 PM
    • 23,921 Posts
    • 62,334 Thanks
    pollypenny
    I don't think I've noticed that as such.
    I don't find it particularly annoying, although I do know that the cognoscenti find the word 'train' used for the locomotive itself, (as opposed to the train of carriages), offensive.

    I used to find it peculiar that guards on trains started referring to 'the next station stop' instead of just 'the next station'. I understood the reason why, but it just seemed superfluous to add 'stop'. After all, would the guard be announcing a station that we were not going to be stopping at?

    I know you can get bus stations as well as railway stations, but growing up and beyond, a 'station' was, and still is to me, a railway station. If one meant a bus station, then that was specified.

    Just trying to think whether I've ever used the term 'train station' or not, but I can't remember.
    Originally posted by Pyxis

    Where I came from bus stations were rare. I think Cardiff, 20 miles away, was the nearest. There was a bus depot 10 miles away, but passengers didnít use it.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 11th Apr 18, 4:43 PM
    • 23,921 Posts
    • 62,334 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Oh, god, I hate 'gifted'. However, I don!!!8217;t mind 'guys' at all; it seems an easy word to cover both sexes. Our British 'chaps' or 'blokes' would not work.


    My main bugbear is demise of the poor little verb 'to take'. Even in good British writing I read stuff like 'I will bring my lunch ..... ' when speaking to someone who will not be present at said exemplar lunch.


    Edit: I went to see the live transmission of Macbeth From the RSC last night and noted this:

    Macbeth ( Macduff). I!!!8217;ll bring you to him.

    I have just checked my copy and, indeed, Shakespeare used 'bring'. Maybe it is a case of Americans using the correct version as with 'gotten' and 'take' is the recent interloper.
    Last edited by pollypenny; 12-04-2018 at 8:32 AM.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 14th Apr 18, 2:53 PM
    • 34,954 Posts
    • 129,775 Thanks
    Pyxis
    Oh, god, I hate 'gifted'. However, I don!!!8217;t mind 'guys' at all; it seems an easy word to cover both sexes. Our British 'chaps' or 'blokes' would not work.


    My main bugbear is demise of the poor little verb 'to take'. Even in good British writing I read stuff like 'I will bring my lunch ..... ' when speaking to someone who will not be present at said exemplar lunch.


    Edit: I went to see the live transmission of Macbeth From the RSC last night and noted this:

    Macbeth ( Macduff). I!!!8217;ll bring you to him.

    I have just checked my copy and, indeed, Shakespeare used 'bring'. Maybe it is a case of Americans using the correct version as with 'gotten' and 'take' is the recent interloper.
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    Is it not a questions of the logistics involved?

    Let's say A is 10 yards to your left and B is 10 yards to your right. You would then bring B to A.

    However, if A were 20 yards to your right and B were still 10 yards to your right, you would then take B to A.

    So, it seems to me that it depends where people/objects are in relation to where you need them to be, iyswim.


    Having said that, though, saying "I'll bring you to him" does sound a bit weird, whereas "I'll bring him to you" sounds right.
    So there appears to be motion involved too, in that context.

    If A (static) is having B brought to him, bring seems correct, but moving A towards B seems to indicate take, imo.

    I hope that makes sense!



    However, to make it even more complicated, to bring someone along with you, in the sense of giving them a lift or accompanying them, seems right, but only in reporting that action to a third party, i.e. "I'm bringing Jack to Sadie's party".

    To Jack, though, I would say "I'm taking you to Sadie's party".



    Anyway, you can't go by what Shakespeare wrote, because very often he would twist words and grammar for some nuance of dramatic effect.
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 15th Apr 18, 8:17 AM
    • 23,921 Posts
    • 62,334 Thanks
    pollypenny
    Pyxis, Shakespeare can do nothing wrong in my eyes!

    Yes, I fully understand the logistics. It is funny, as I was complaining about the death of 'take' to a friend on Tuesday, using exactly this sort of example

    I actually said 'I will take Ceri home. Tell Ann that I will bring Ceri home.'
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Sleazy
    • By Sleazy 15th Apr 18, 8:26 AM
    • 8,610 Posts
    • 14,140 Thanks
    Sleazy
    My Sunday Morning message to you all is :
    "Bring me something nice and I'll be pleased to take it"
    Last edited by Sleazy; 15-04-2018 at 8:30 AM.
    Sleazy
    In Vino Veritas, In Aqua Sanitas
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 15th Apr 18, 9:16 AM
    • 23,921 Posts
    • 62,334 Thanks
    pollypenny
    My Sunday Morning message to you all is :
    "Bring me something nice and I'll be pleased to take it"
    Originally posted by Sleazy


    Where?
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 15th Apr 18, 11:00 AM
    • 34,954 Posts
    • 129,775 Thanks
    Pyxis
    Pyxis, Shakespeare can do nothing wrong in my eyes!

    Yes, I fully understand the logistics. It is funny, as I was complaining about the death of 'take' to a friend on Tuesday, using exactly this sort of example

    I actually said 'I will take Ceri home. Tell Ann that I will bring Ceri home.'
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    Yup! It all depends on the perspective and which direction that's in!

    Re. the Bard....... oh he does nothing wrong, agreed! I just meant that the language he uses in his plays is not necessarily the actual language wot wos spoke, but, like the latter, put in for effect!
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
    • prowla
    • By prowla 15th Apr 18, 11:54 AM
    • 9,746 Posts
    • 7,807 Thanks
    prowla
    "An (h)istoric" - no, it's "A historic".
    "An (h)otel" - no, it's "A hotel".
    "An (h)eirloom" - yes, that's correct.
    • pollypenny
    • By pollypenny 15th Apr 18, 5:42 PM
    • 23,921 Posts
    • 62,334 Thanks
    pollypenny
    "An (h)istoric" - no, it's "A historic".
    "An (h)otel" - no, it's "A hotel".
    "An (h)eirloom" - yes, that's correct.
    Originally posted by prowla


    I had to check that. I can remember being taught 'an hotel' many years ago in grammar school. I always assumed it was because the word came from the French.

    The Oxford Dictionary site now says 'a' more usual, so either seems acceptable.
    Last edited by pollypenny; 16-04-2018 at 7:55 AM.
    Member #14 of SKI-ers club

    Words, words, they're all we have to go by!.

    (Pity they are mangled by this autocorrect!)
    • Pyxis
    • By Pyxis 15th Apr 18, 6:00 PM
    • 34,954 Posts
    • 129,775 Thanks
    Pyxis
    "An (h)istoric" - no, it's "A historic".
    "An (h)otel" - no, it's "A hotel".
    "An (h)eirloom" - yes, that's correct.
    Originally posted by prowla
    I had to check that. I can remember being taught 'an hotel' many years ago in grammar school. I always assumed it was because the word came from the French.

    The Oxford Dictionasite now says 'a' more usual, so either seems acceptable.
    Originally posted by pollypenny
    The first two words are in transition from the 'correct' pronunciation of 'istoric' and 'otel' (from the French, as you say, Pollypenny, where the h is silent), to the anglicised forms 'hotel' and 'historic' ( where the h is sounded).

    They are almost completely anglicised now, I would say, with only a few people still sticking to the French pronunciation.

    However, what is a bit odd is that other words which came from French still do not have the h pronounced........e.g. honest, hour, honour.
    'He's an honest person etc.

    Unlike horrible, human, host and humour, which came from French but were anglicised with the h pronounced.


    I don't know why some retained the French pronunciation and others didn't.

    I'll have to look into it.

    Interesting!
    (I just lurve spiders! )
    INFJ(Turbulent).

    Her Greenliness Baroness Pyxis of the Alphabetty, Pinnacle of Peadom
    Founder Member: WIMPS ANONYMOUS
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