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  • FIRST POST
    • COOLTRIKERCHICK
    • By COOLTRIKERCHICK 4th Oct 14, 10:37 AM
    • 10,419Posts
    • 58,340Thanks
    COOLTRIKERCHICK
    Daydream fund challenge part 4
    • #1
    • 4th Oct 14, 10:37 AM
    Daydream fund challenge part 4 4th Oct 14 at 10:37 AM
    back in march 2009. this thread started, as I had daydreamed of having a smallholding for far too many years than I can remember.. since then, we are now on our 4th new thread.. and have a nice bunch of mse'rs who are at various stages of their dream... even if you ream is to have a plot of land, or a house with a nice garden.. join in, all are welcome..


    here are the links to the other 3 threads
    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=1544047&highlight=daydream
    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=3812953&highlight=daydream










































































































    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=4651793&highlight=daydream
    Last edited by COOLTRIKERCHICK; 04-10-2014 at 12:24 PM.
    Work to live= not live to work
Page 464
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 10th Nov 18, 11:35 PM
    • 26,634 Posts
    • 96,027 Thanks
    Davesnave
    It rained quite hard here in the morning, but we're far from flooded. The stream was running tonight, but if I can't hear the waterfall from the yard, it's not that full. The river gauge on t'internet is also saying 'normal.'

    We had interesting winds for a time this morning, with the direction at ground level being strongly from the SE and the clouds travelling west to east!

    Off to church in the morning for the one occasion in the year when I go. Hope it isn't as dire as it was last year, or this will be the last time.....
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Nov 18, 5:49 PM
    • 26,634 Posts
    • 96,027 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Well...yesterday's Remembrance service was dull, despite there being a new vicar and curate. A case of old wine in new bottles..... Come to think of it, a case of wine would have improved it no end!


    At least the sun shone and the churchyard looked very picturesque.


    We returned to find that our hedgcutting guy had turned-up (at last!) but because we weren't there, he'd done some work differently from the way we'd intended. Luckily, we were able to stop him giving most of the road hedge a crew-cut, so we can still get onto a 2 or 3 year cycle with it. All the rugosa roses are back to zero again though...Aaarrrggghhh!
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
    • potplant
    • By potplant 13th Nov 18, 12:44 AM
    • 22 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    potplant
    May I join you?
    At last I'm about to start reclaiming my very overgrown garden - tree surgeons are finishing work tomorrow, so it will be less heavily shaded, and there's several days of clearing and re- fencing starting the week after. A few weeks back I read this thread from the very beginning (and took notes!), then hesitated because I'm not very used to posting, but would love advice and views since you seem (a) very knowledgeable and (b) kind, civilised and entertaining!

    So here goes. Its a London garden, faces southeast, heavy clay soil, about 80 feet long; there's quite a bit of shade from surrounding trees, but as from tomorrow I hope there will be a lot less from my neighbour's Leylandii which is the worst offender. (He's very happy it's being cut back, it was there when he moved in.)

    Over the years the garden's had various phases including a playground with sandpit, then climbing frame etc, then trampoline; then it declined ( we were abroad, then I got injured and couldn't garden for a long time, and it started becoming a wilderness). Now the onetime trampoliniste is in her 20s and we (husband and me) are both retired, it's time for a new plan. Which in my mind involves a kind of allotment, maybe a raised bed, at the far end of the garden, where I've always grown soft fruit, more so before it became too shaded; some edible plants mixed in with purely ornamental ones nearer the house where things like tomatos and courgettes will get a bit more sun; all kinds of favourite plants which I already have in pots or which have survived years of neglect in situ, plus a long list of others which I want to replace or try for the first time. ( I have quite a few seeds collected in readiness, and am reasonably good at cuttings and dividing plants.) And some nice places to sit. Husband is a bit disabled and can't really do gardening but it would be good if he can sit and enjoy being there.

    So - in 2 weeks' time I should have not a blank slate, but at least a greatly cleared one, and as I start in on it I would really appreciate advice (and warnings, and indeed random thoughts from experienced gardeners). Eg: I'll see tomorrow (once there is less Leylandii skulking overhead) how shaded it will be where I'm hoping to put a veg. bed. Assuming it's semi- shade, will that be ok to grow leafy veg like perpetual spinach, chard, parsley? And autumn-fruiting raspberries, which used to do well there, and blackberries?
    Please brace yourselves for more questions as this gets under way!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 13th Nov 18, 7:17 PM
    • 26,634 Posts
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    Davesnave
    Hi potplant...what a great name! Good to have you on-board.

    The garden you describe is pretty close to what we had ten years ago: the aspect is similar and we were on yukky alkaline clay. There were large trees and some surrounding houses stealing part of the sunshine. It was fine for everything, except lime haters and evening barbecues, as the sun left the back of the house early. I poked a small patio in on the side to catch the sunsets.

    All the plants you mention will do fine in semi shade. We used to get gooseberries and blackcurrants too, till the desire to propagate more ornamentals for sale finally put paid to any gardening with edibles.

    Yes, we're a civilised lot here. A few of us can be a little combative at times on other boards at MSE, but we leave all that at the door when we put on our wellies! Sometimes people go months without posting, but we don't mind that either, or what sort of garden anyone has...or even if they have one at all. After all, everyone's a potential gardener, aren't they?

    Lovely day down yer in sunny Deb'n today, so the final tweaks to the drains happened and that's all done & dusted. Also, had a walk round the hedges with DW to plan our attack this winter, as we seem to think we can carry on taming the road hedge in addition to building paths. I think the weather will probably have the last word!
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
    • alfie 1
    • By alfie 1 13th Nov 18, 8:07 PM
    • 5,716 Posts
    • 46,171 Thanks
    alfie 1
    evening all..... including potplant


    the only POSSIBLY usefull thing I can add potplant is ... don't forget the sun is much lower at this time of year so maybe you will get more sun than you think ? absolutely no idea how to work out HOW much more tho
    im one of those "planters" that basically if ive borrowed / nicked the seeds OR scrounged plants that peeps were chucking OR got any of above from the bargain bucket .....it grows in my garden


    im ALF , the resident animog loving, accident prone , bargain loving one ...
    the others all know what they are talking about...
    • potplant
    • By potplant 13th Nov 18, 10:53 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    potplant
    Thank you for the welcome! Dave, I did grow a few gooseberry bushes before (Whinhams Industry and Leveller - I liked the names!) and I might try again if they can manage a bit of shade - there are probably better varieties, if less poetically named. The tree surgeons took a good big chunk of Leylandii off, and after that a truly Biblical-looking ray of sun appeared and lit up the undergrowth and ivy and decrepit trampoline in the space where I 'm imagining a raised bed will go. Which seems a good omen practically as well as metaphorically. Alfie, I've followed your animal stories and I'm looking forward to St Bernard stories, we have no pets now (only lots of garden birds, squirrels, foxes) so I enjoy all of your animals.
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 14th Nov 18, 8:33 AM
    • 3,298 Posts
    • 8,735 Thanks
    tori.k
    Hiya Potplant
    Im in the dog house with DH after he spent Sunday clearing the conservatory after me moaning about the mess, it cheeses me off that they use a glass box to dump their mess, but then i've turned it into a greenhouse as I went off on one and decide we needed a backdrop for my tree ferns so started a living wall im keeping it cheaper with mixed ferns, ajuga and japanese forest grass.But he wandered off muttering this "This isn't bloody Chelsea"
    Ironically everything im doing is making things lower maintenance going forward, he needs to stop being a miser he can't take it with him
    Procrastinating on going to work started the big moves in the garden Centre to make room for the cut trees. Boss keeps threatening each year this will be the last year for cut trees, They are used for footfall and hard work for such little profit, I already ache with just the idea.
    Better woMAN up and get on with it
    Debit to Credit (stage 1) 3652.34 completed 15/10/16
    Debit to Credit (stage 2) 6299.09 completed 25/06/17
    Mortgage Free (stage 3) 140000/ 4389
    Save 12k in 2018 #76 5000/6000
    • potplant
    • By potplant 14th Nov 18, 5:56 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    potplant
    I have just googled Japanese forest grass, which I'd never come across, and now it's added it to my long list of plants I want. (I thought my garden was quite big enough, but I'm starting to have doubts). A living wall and tree ferns sound wonderful.
    Does anyone have recommendations for a cultivated blackberry which would be happy in clay and some shade?
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 14th Nov 18, 6:32 PM
    • 3,298 Posts
    • 8,735 Thanks
    tori.k
    Loch Ness is a good thornless cropper but you will want to lighten the soil with some compost and mulch or the easy version a topsoil top up
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 14th Nov 18, 6:39 PM
    • 26,634 Posts
    • 96,027 Thanks
    Davesnave
    On the edge of the wild garden copse I grow 'Chester,' mainly because the original plant was only 2 in Morrisons, but it's also a huge thing and knows how to fight its corner! Sadly, sometimes the sheep have eaten it, but we had a good crop this year.


    We also grow Loch Maree, which is pretty with double flowers, but a bit wimpy for us.
    A garden is never so good as it will be next year....
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