Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    Former MSE Debs
    Real-life MMD: Should friend cough up for broken iPhone?
    • #1
    • 30th Aug 12, 9:17 AM
    Real-life MMD: Should friend cough up for broken iPhone? 30th Aug 12 at 9:17 AM
    Money Moral Dilemma: Should friend cough up for broken iPhone?


    My 13yr old saved up for two years to get an iPhone, which he bought six months ago. Last week one of his friends pushed him in a river and now the iPhone no longer works. The phone recycling companies won't offer more than 50 for it and though it's covered by my home insurance, the excess makes it not worth claiming. Should he ask the person responsible to contribute a little?

    Click reply to have your say

    Note: Please remember that these are real-life Money Moral Dilemmas and while we want you to have your say, please remember to be nice when you respond.


    Previous MMDs:
    View All


    This Forum Tip was included in MoneySavingExpert's weekly email

    Don't miss out on new deals, loopholes, and vouchers

    Last edited by Former MSE Debs; 11-09-2012 at 5:47 PM.
Page 1
    • lizardking
    • By lizardking 11th Sep 12, 8:19 PM
    • 37 Posts
    • 362 Thanks
    lizardking
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 12, 8:19 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 12, 8:19 PM
    Actions have consequences and his friend should have really given some consideration before pulling the prank, if the tables were turned I'd guess his parents wouldn't hang around in asking for at least a contribution towards a replacement phone.
    • tgroom57
    • By tgroom57 11th Sep 12, 8:56 PM
    • 1,315 Posts
    • 12,694 Thanks
    tgroom57
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 12, 8:56 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 12, 8:56 PM
    Yes, he and his parents should pay for the phone in full or replace it with one of equal value (before it got wet). I'm not sure how you'd go about it though, I would be tempted to put the insurance claim in and give the name and address of the perpetrator with details.

    Pushing someone into a river is more than 'a prank' - endangering person & property more like.

    • bossymoo
    • By bossymoo 11th Sep 12, 9:00 PM
    • 6,817 Posts
    • 87,056 Thanks
    bossymoo
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 12, 9:00 PM
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 12, 9:00 PM
    I'd want to know why anyone thinks it acceptable to push a 13yo in a river! Never mind the bliddy phone, he could have drowned!

    But yes, they ought to contribute in some way.
    Bossymoo

    Away with the fairies
    • whitewing
    • By whitewing 11th Sep 12, 9:00 PM
    • 11,541 Posts
    • 48,331 Thanks
    whitewing
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 12, 9:00 PM
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 12, 9:00 PM
    On the basis that his friend probably knew he had a mobile (let alone an i phone), yes he should face the consequences and pay for it.
    When you find people who not only tolerate your quirks but celebrate them with glad cries of "Me too!" be sure to cherish them. Because these weirdos are your true family.
    • reluctantworkingmum
    • By reluctantworkingmum 11th Sep 12, 11:39 PM
    • 126 Posts
    • 115 Thanks
    reluctantworkingmum
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 12, 11:39 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 12, 11:39 PM
    I’m sorry if this gets the PC brigade going BUT - The trouble with kids today (IMO) is that we as parents don’t make them accept responsibility for their actions. What should happen is that you tell the kids mother he pushed your son in the river, she gets him to apologise and reimburse (out of his pocket money) the cost of a refurbished phone – from a proper phone shop.
    What probably will happen is that either you wont like to say anything, or if you do, the kid’s mother will come up with various reasons why sonny shouldn’t pay, you will replace it yourself – and neither kid will learn what ‘responsibility’ means.
  • im-lost
    • #7
    • 12th Sep 12, 2:04 AM
    • #7
    • 12th Sep 12, 2:04 AM
    Actions have consequences and his friend should have really given some consideration before pulling the prank, if the tables were turned I'd guess his parents wouldn't hang around in asking for at least a contribution towards a replacement phone.
    Originally posted by lizardking
    Yes, he and his parents should pay for the phone in full or replace it with one of equal value (before it got wet). I'm not sure how you'd go about it though, I would be tempted to put the insurance claim in and give the name and address of the perpetrator with details.

    Pushing someone into a river is more than 'a prank' - endangering person & property more like.
    Originally posted by tgroom57
    I'd want to know why anyone thinks it acceptable to push a 13yo in a river! Never mind the bliddy phone, he could have drowned!

    But yes, they ought to contribute in some way.
    Originally posted by bossymoo
    Its called being a child and having fun. do you remember what that
    is like? im guessing by your replies you have long since forgot about
    what you got up to in your childhood, either that or you were one of
    these kids that roamed around in their gardens for a few minutes a
    day, befor being taken inside by your oh so lovely and doting parents.

    Action and consequences my foot.

    If the 'other' child is at fault, then surely the one who has a wet phone
    is also at fault for taking it whilst playing near rivers..
    children don't go and play near rivers to sit on the bank staring up at
    the clouds..
    • ronangel
    • By ronangel 12th Sep 12, 3:44 AM
    • 124 Posts
    • 141 Thanks
    ronangel
    • #8
    • 12th Sep 12, 3:44 AM
    iphone replace
    • #8
    • 12th Sep 12, 3:44 AM
    No messing about here, the boy could have been seriously hurt apart from the phone. tell the parents that unless they pay for a replacement phone you will be taking out a summons against their son for assault and suing for damages and costs of his phone and clothing. he could end up with a criminal record and or fine/community service depending on his past behaviour. be polite and take a large friend who stands some distance away but can be seen, when you go to see them and be prepared for a punch in the mouth. you may get a promise to pay. explain if you do not receive money in 28 days you will take out summons without contacting them again. or you might just get the money.... choose time of seeing them carefully best in public place spoken quietly with plenty of witnesses. good luck!
    The richard montgomery matter

  • mr-tom
    • #9
    • 12th Sep 12, 4:33 AM
    • #9
    • 12th Sep 12, 4:33 AM
    Its called being a child and having fun. do you remember what that
    is like? im guessing by your replies you have long since forgot about
    what you got up to in your childhood, either that or you were one of
    these kids that roamed around in their gardens for a few minutes a
    day, befor being taken inside by your oh so lovely and doting parents.

    Action and consequences my foot.

    If the 'other' child is at fault, then surely the one who has a wet phone
    is also at fault for taking it whilst playing near rivers..
    children don't go and play near rivers to sit on the bank staring up at
    the clouds..
    Originally posted by im-lost
    I agree entirely.

    Kids are kids. This could so easily have been rough and tumble in the playground rather than pushing in the river. Either way, the phone would be dead.

    I think that the only way we can give 13 year olds valuable, vulnerable and portable devices is if both they and all those they come into contact with agree to surrender their childhood.

    It's not going to happen.

    Bad idea to let kids have iPhones.
    • robpw2
    • By robpw2 12th Sep 12, 4:38 AM
    • 12,647 Posts
    • 26,389 Thanks
    robpw2
    I agree entirely.

    Kids are kids. This could so easily have been rough and tumble in the playground rather than pushing in the river. Either way, the phone would be dead.
    Originally posted by mr-tom
    yes rough and tumble in the playground is how the school described all bulllying so as not to make it seem a problem ,
    the fact that everyday i would have to put up with "rough and tumble" even though i wasnt wanting to be involved

    i am sorry but pushing someone in a river is not rough and tumble its unacceptable the boy could have drowned!!!


    Slimming world start 28/01/2012 starting weight 21st 2.5lb current weight 17st 9-total loss 3st 7.5lb
    Slimmer of the month February , March ,April
    • Talent
    • By Talent 12th Sep 12, 4:50 AM
    • 244 Posts
    • 219 Thanks
    Talent
    It seems everyone is assuming it's a Amazon-wide torrential flooding rapids. It could just as easily have been a local paddling stream or brook?
    Sure the kid should pay towards a replacement but I would also question the sensibility in 'going out to play' with a high value electronic item.
    Street cred comes at a cost!
    • iclayt
    • By iclayt 12th Sep 12, 7:20 AM
    • 420 Posts
    • 823 Thanks
    iclayt
    Yes, the pusher should make a contribution. Ask - the worst that can happen is he (or his parents) say no, and you're no worse off than you are now.
    • bouncydog1
    • By bouncydog1 12th Sep 12, 7:42 AM
    • 2,603 Posts
    • 2,058 Thanks
    bouncydog1
    Would definately go and see the parents about their child pushing yours into the river because it could have been very serious.

    With regards to the phone I would see what they say. They may offer to buy a cheaper replacement and I would be with them on that.

    What on earth was a 13 year old doing with an iphone - surely at 13 if felt that a phone is needed the cheapest "pay as you go" would suffice.

    An expensive lesson learned for your son, but letting him have an iphone - which have a reputation for not being particularly robust - is madness imo. He could just have easily have been mugged for his phone or worse.

    If the parents refuse to accept any responsibility then as your son's guardian it is up to you whether or not you pursue the matter - the boys will be friends again tomorrow anyway!
    • ec9wrr
    • By ec9wrr 12th Sep 12, 8:02 AM
    • 161 Posts
    • 45 Thanks
    ec9wrr
    I forgot I had my iPhone in my pocket and walked into the sea with it! Needless to say, it didn't work any more. I booked a slot with genius and got a replacement for 139. I was within the 12 month warranty (although the fault was definitely mine and not covered by warranty!).

    I would say friend should pay towards the 139. The full amount if he has the money, a contribution if not.
  • hpsauce
    Need more facts really.

    If they are mates and had gone down to muck around in the river and were BOTH messing about then he should have been more careful.

    If on the other hand they were just walking past it and his mate just pushed him in then he does need to take some responsibility.

    I think the drowning thing might be a bit over the top from the PC crowd as in the hot weather the other day I saw plenty of kids messing about in the local river to cool down and it was nice to see.

    Personally I think letting a kid have an iphone is asking for trouble as I wouldn't even trust myself with something worth that kind of money in my pocket all day, but if you must the sensible thing for something worth that money would have been to get it insured as kids do often break things.
    Mortgage highest Aug 2007 200,000
    Mortage now Oct 2014 143,015
    Offset savings Oct 2014 51,799
    • minuettoallegretto
    • By minuettoallegretto 12th Sep 12, 8:12 AM
    • 112 Posts
    • 886 Thanks
    minuettoallegretto
    Fair play, the lad managed to save up for his own iphone - but what on earth possessed him to take 2 years worth of saving near a river without insurance? Huge lesson there in forward planning.
    All that aside, I would ask for a contribution towards a replacement, and then be prepared for a refusal and also a lost friendship. If the friend is that irresponsible to risk a life then it sounds like the lost friendship is no loss at all.

  • mr-tom
    yes rough and tumble in the playground is how the school described all bulllying so as not to make it seem a problem ,
    the fact that everyday i would have to put up with "rough and tumble" even though i wasnt wanting to be involved

    i am sorry but pushing someone in a river is not rough and tumble its unacceptable the boy could have drowned!!!
    Originally posted by robpw2
    Hi Rob.

    I think it is important to realise that this child is not you.

    When I was a child, I was also bullied, but that doesn't mean that when I played with my real friends, there wasn't rough and tumble.

    The moral dilemma does not tell us that any malice was involved, if it was, then this would surely be a matter for the police as a river was involved.

    This particular dilemma sounds a lot more like play, "my son broke his Rolex playing rugby" if you will. Bullying was not mentioned, so please don't bring it into it as my response to a bully would of of course be different.
    Last edited by mr-tom; 12-09-2012 at 8:50 AM. Reason: Typos
  • mr-tom
    Fair play, the lad managed to save up for his own iphone - but what on earth possessed him to take 2 years worth of saving near a river without insurance? Huge lesson there in forward planning.
    All that aside, I would ask for a contribution towards a replacement, and then be prepared for a refusal and also a lost friendship. If the friend is that irresponsible to risk a life then it sounds like the lost friendship is no loss at all.
    Originally posted by minuettoallegretto
    Agreed.

    Important lesson. Kids break stuff. Don't let them have anything valuable.
  • parky0607
    Id love to know how parents can afford to pay for their kids to have these phones anyway! At age 21, 5 years after starting full time employment (in a decent job) I was just able to afford a contract phone which was more than 10 p/m for myself, let alone anyone else!

    Getting back to the point... you should definately mention it to the kids parents and see what theyd suggest (mention how theyd feel in your shoes). If you cant come to an agreement, then I guess its a lesson learnt for not having insurance, and I would buy your child a bog-standard replacement phone which should teach them to look after their stuff properly!
    • mr-mixalot
    • By mr-mixalot 12th Sep 12, 8:50 AM
    • 77 Posts
    • 62 Thanks
    mr-mixalot
    Why would you let your 13yr old take an iPhone to school

    You have to ask that question as well, it it just because he wanted to fit in and look cool, if thats the case then he needs his self esteem raising, having a cool phone is not the be all and end all

    I bought my 13 yr old a60 smart phone thats way better than the iPhone, if he loses it I won't be that bothered but sheesh sending you child to school with a 200+ plus device is just asking for trouble.

    Although in this instance the parents / his friend should definitley pay but getting them to do it may result in a broken friendship that may have other consequences.

    Good Luck
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,599Posts Today

6,252Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • "Sabrina, you're young. I'm not sure you've the experience I'm looking for in a business partner." Eh? Isn't the pr? https://t.co/IeTxBQq2OU

  • I am predicting the word myself will be misused 6 times in today;s boardroom. What do yourself think? #TheApprentice

  • Not sure how I ever succeeded running a successful entreprise? After all my gardening and garden design skills are? https://t.co/FFnvkjsGDU

  • Follow Martin