Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Martin
    • By MSE Martin 20th Mar 07, 4:48 PM
    • 8,111Posts
    • 42,248Thanks
    MSE Martin
    MONEY MORAL DILEMMA: Grant's been overpaid, should he keep it?
    • #1
    • 20th Mar 07, 4:48 PM
    MONEY MORAL DILEMMA: Grant's been overpaid, should he keep it? 20th Mar 07 at 4:48 PM
    Here's this week's hypothetical situation for you to cogitate on:

    Grant's been overpaid, should he keep it?


    Grant's been working at Phil's small garage for nine years. Barring the odd disagreement, the two have always got on well. Yet in his final paypacket he's been paid for the full months work, yet he's only actually done three weeks worth. Should he own up to the overpayment, or should he keep schtum?


    Click reply to enter the money moral maze (please remember, be polite to other MoneySavers, even if you disagree with them).

    Previous MMDs: Should Thelma lend Louise her money? and Should Monica go out with Bill for his money?

    Last edited by MSE Archna; 21-03-2007 at 4:59 PM.
    Martin Lewis, Money Saving Expert.
    Please note, answers don't constitute financial advice, it is based on generalised journalistic research. Always ensure any decision is made with regards to your own individual circumstance.

    Don't miss out on urgent MoneySaving, get my weekly e-mail at www.moneysavingexpert.com/tips.

    Debt-Free Wannabee Official Nerd Club: (Honorary) Members number 000
Page 1
  • greekray
    • #2
    • 20th Mar 07, 10:35 PM
    • #2
    • 20th Mar 07, 10:35 PM
    Grant should declare his bosses mistake can he be sure that he always gives 100% if was the other way round he would soon be in the office
    honest Ray.
    • Mark7799
    • By Mark7799 20th Mar 07, 11:04 PM
    • 4,678 Posts
    • 3,247 Thanks
    Mark7799
    • #3
    • 20th Mar 07, 11:04 PM
    • #3
    • 20th Mar 07, 11:04 PM
    Unequivocal - he should own up and be able to leave with a clear conscience.
    • Mics_chick
    • By Mics_chick 20th Mar 07, 11:37 PM
    • 11,688 Posts
    • 11,566 Thanks
    Mics_chick
    • #4
    • 20th Mar 07, 11:37 PM
    • #4
    • 20th Mar 07, 11:37 PM
    I think if they got on well then he should own up about the mistake.

    But in my mind if I was leaving somewhere and they had treated me like a piece of dogsh*t on their shoes (which unfortunately I do have some experience of) then I would say nothing and just walk away with a smirk on my face
    You should never call somebody else a nerd or geek because everybody (even YOU !!!) is an
    "anorak" about something whether it's trains, computers, football, shoes or celebs
    • Thunderbird
    • By Thunderbird 20th Mar 07, 11:51 PM
    • 612 Posts
    • 265 Thanks
    Thunderbird
    • #5
    • 20th Mar 07, 11:51 PM
    • #5
    • 20th Mar 07, 11:51 PM
    He should own up to the overpayment, regardless to his relationship with Phil.
    • zzzLazyDaisy
    • By zzzLazyDaisy 21st Mar 07, 12:05 AM
    • 12,134 Posts
    • 18,762 Thanks
    zzzLazyDaisy
    • #6
    • 21st Mar 07, 12:05 AM
    • #6
    • 21st Mar 07, 12:05 AM
    funnily enough, that happened to me. I told the employer about the overpayment, but they insisted their calculation was right :-)

    Yep, he should tell them
    • Pound
    • By Pound 21st Mar 07, 12:10 AM
    • 2,662 Posts
    • 1,323 Thanks
    Pound
    • #7
    • 21st Mar 07, 12:10 AM
    • #7
    • 21st Mar 07, 12:10 AM
    Tell them, definetly.

    If the boss finds out about it later they have the right have it back. Grant might need a reference or even a job from them later and this will be affected if the employer knows Grant tried to fleece a weeks pay out of them.

  • sclo
    • #8
    • 21st Mar 07, 12:23 AM
    • #8
    • 21st Mar 07, 12:23 AM
    I would deffo own up. Is a friendship worth destroying? Would you really ruin your personal integrity for a weeks salary? I think not.

    Sclo
    • loadsacash
    • By loadsacash 21st Mar 07, 6:51 AM
    • 529 Posts
    • 362 Thanks
    loadsacash
    • #9
    • 21st Mar 07, 6:51 AM
    • #9
    • 21st Mar 07, 6:51 AM
    I think that he should tell him.

    A clear concience is more important than money - also he may need Phil in the future for a referance.
    Treat everyday as your last one on earth! and one day you will be right.
  • Jinty
    As he knows that he has been overpaid, if he does not give the money back then technically it is stealing. But it might be the wages that will cover his week in hand that he worked on first joining the garage. Did he receive any accrued holiday pay?
    • Poppy9
    • By Poppy9 21st Mar 07, 8:08 AM
    • 17,986 Posts
    • 22,277 Thanks
    Poppy9
    He should check the calculation as it maybe holiday pay owing or he may have been asked to leave on x date after he resigned and not work his full contractual notice. If this was the case then the pay maybe correct.
    ~Laugh and the world laughs with you, weep and you weep alone.~
  • cazrobinson
    If he wants to keep his job, he should explain he's got overpaid!
    What goes around - comes around
    give lots and you will always recieve lots
    • TheBaldwins
    • By TheBaldwins 21st Mar 07, 9:01 AM
    • 30 Posts
    • 25 Thanks
    TheBaldwins
    Don't work for friends!
    As he's a friend, I would own up. Working for friends is never a good idea (if they are a friend beforehand).
    I was in a similar position but with a big company instead and i didn't own up. They came after me for the money (about 200) and I agreed to pay back 5 a month (I was a poor student at the time). I paid back 20 and then didn't pay any more - they let it drop as it probably cost them more to chase it up! Do I feel bad? Not at all!
    ****************************************
    Money saving is addictive... get help and join MSE!
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 21st Mar 07, 9:24 AM
    • 8,404 Posts
    • 29,530 Thanks
    Primrose
    Yes. he should tell them he's received more money than he expected, query whether it was unused holiday entitlement or a week in hand, or ask whether it was a genuine mistake of overpayment.
  • eternal optimist
    No dilemma! He should definitely own up!

    He may have miscalculated, he may be owed holiday pay, he may have lying time due from when he first started, his boss may have included a bonus. he may even have been underpaid once all this has been taken into account.

    It is always important to be ABSOLUTELY clear about what you've been paid and why.
  • rag_doll
    If he's not entitled to the money then he should own up, no dilemma there !
    FAIRTRADE NOT FREE TRADE

    STOP THE BADGER CULL - PLEASE SIGN HM GOVERNMENT E-PETITION
  • kikibee
    He should definetly own up.
    1 They have had a good working relationship.
    2 It might be a little bonus
    3 It might be holiday pay owing
    4 Its good to leave knowing you can ask for a reference that will be in your favour
    5 You never know, if things don't work out you might have to ask for your old job back.
    Kikibee
    • jellybean0k
    • By jellybean0k 21st Mar 07, 9:53 AM
    • 25 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    jellybean0k
    definately give it back
    "he's not the messiah, he's a very naughty boy"
  • kikibee
    Actually I have just remembered that about 14 years ago I left a job and they had forgotten to take me off the payroll unbeknown to me. I used to be paid fortnightly into my bank and I received pay 2 weeks after leaving. I presumed it was my last pay/hols owing etc. Then they realised after a while and demanded the money back with threatening letters. I went to the CAB who were great and wrote to them telling them they were in the wrong for their oversight and that they could have the money back at x amount a month. I really did not realise this was not my money but it still caused a bit of hassle for me to sort out so I guess what I am saying is apart from my previous post, if you don't like having a little wrangle, just own up.
    Kikibee
  • Martin_Edney
    Honesty is always the best policy.

    If Grant owns up, his honesty will be remembered and valued, and when he needs a favour from Phil (the boss), he'll be treated much more favourably.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

114Posts Today

1,472Users online

Martin's Twitter