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  • FIRST POST
    • jayII
    • By jayII 27th May 12, 7:04 AM
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    jayII
    How much allowance for teenagers?
    • #1
    • 27th May 12, 7:04 AM
    How much allowance for teenagers? 27th May 12 at 7:04 AM
    Morning all.

    I am trying to work out a reasonable amount for an all-in monthly allowance for teenagers of 15 and 16?
    It needs to cover occasional school bus fares, bike servicing for the rest of the time , clothes, toiletries, socialising/transport to friends/mobiles etc. They also usually buy lunch at school but I provide bread etc for packed lunches, and we have a hot meal each night, so paying for lunch is their choice.

    My plan is to give them nothing at all extra, apart from school uniform, essential school spends and birthday/christmas presents. I really love buying them the odd treat and item of clothing so that will be hard for me, but I think it's essential that they learn to manage their cash before they head off to jobs and university.

    I'm thinking about 140/month each, what do people think?
    Fighting the biggest battle of my life. Started 30th January 2018.
Page 1
  • AllyS
    • #2
    • 27th May 12, 7:11 AM
    • #2
    • 27th May 12, 7:11 AM
    My dd is 13, since she went to snr school, I give her 60 allowance a month. This covers school dinner, phone, clothes, beauty products anything that is 'wanted'. I buy her necessity stuff such as school clothes, jeans, t shirts, shoes, but only what she needs. If she wants the pretty t shirt in new look that is her money. She is already fantastic with money and manages to save about 15 a month. She ebays, charity shops etc... her allowance also covers her social life! Altho living rural and near several beaches this is mainly drinks and bus fares

    Hope this helps
    • jinty271
    • By jinty271 27th May 12, 7:13 AM
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    jinty271
    • #3
    • 27th May 12, 7:13 AM
    • #3
    • 27th May 12, 7:13 AM
    We do something similar for our almost 15 year old.

    We pay for school lunches, essential clothing, school trips, and we cover her phone contract.

    We give her the 80 p/m ( this came from a row about Child Benefit!) - and she needs to cover all her own entertainment, bus-fares, make up, "going out" clothes and such like.

    It actually works well - she is starting to learn to not go nuts on her " pay-day" as she didn't like not being able to go to the cinema at the end of the month as she was skint .

    Based on the expenses you have listed, the amount you suggest seems fair. I would say though, it is really tough - you need to be very strong , as it is very easy to give into them when they want something that they haven't budgeted for, and we found at the start of this experiment that we ended up giving in for a quiet life - it took a few months to remember to say " oh Im sorry , that is something that is supposed to come out of your allowance".

    Edit - initially 80 seemed an awful lot to be handing over each month, just for entertainment etc, but when we worked it out, we were definately handing over more than 20 per week - " can i have a tenner to go pictures, a fiver to go swimming, mam I need foundation" and such like !
    Last edited by jinty271; 27-05-2012 at 7:17 AM.
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    • HappyMJ
    • By HappyMJ 27th May 12, 7:17 AM
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    HappyMJ
    • #4
    • 27th May 12, 7:17 AM
    • #4
    • 27th May 12, 7:17 AM
    Morning all.

    I am trying to work out a reasonable amount for an all-in monthly allowance for teenagers of 15 and 16?
    It needs to cover occasional school bus fares, bike servicing for the rest of the time , clothes, toiletries, socialising/transport to friends/mobiles etc. They also usually buy lunch at school but I provide bread etc for packed lunches, and we have a hot meal each night, so paying for lunch is their choice.

    My plan is to give them nothing at all extra, apart from school uniform, essential school spends and birthday/christmas presents. I really love buying them the odd treat and item of clothing so that will be hard for me, but I think it's essential that they learn to manage their cash before they head off to jobs and university.

    I'm thinking about 140/month each, what do people think?
    Originally posted by jayII
    That's 32.30 a week. Quite high considering the JSA for young people under 25 is 56.25 per week and out of that they need to pay board or if living away from home it pays for everything including food and bills.

    Saying that though I do give the 13 yr old DD the child benefit of 20.30 a week and she buys everything she wants with it. Food will always be in the fridge so she does not have to buy food but she can choose to if she wants.

    Regular savers earn 6% interest (HSBC, First Direct, M&S) Loans cost 2.9% per year (Nationwide) = FREE money.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 27th May 12, 7:21 AM
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    PasturesNew
    • #5
    • 27th May 12, 7:21 AM
    • #5
    • 27th May 12, 7:21 AM
    When I was 16/17 I used to get 1/week, which was the equivalent of one hour's work in my Saturday job. I had to pay for my lunch one day/week, all my shoes/clothes/hair cuts, my course materials, my exams and a monthly magazine that was a course requirement. I also had to pay for a lot of my college exams. It also had to pay for any socialising/travel I wanted to do myself.

    That's why I had to have a Saturday job and work in the holidays.
    • jayII
    • By jayII 27th May 12, 7:30 AM
    • 38,158 Posts
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    jayII
    • #6
    • 27th May 12, 7:30 AM
    • #6
    • 27th May 12, 7:30 AM
    We do something similar for our almost 15 year old.

    We pay for school lunches, essential clothing, school trips, and we cover her phone contract.

    We give her the 80 p/m ( this came from a row about Child Benefit!) - and she needs to cover all her own entertainment, bus-fares, make up, "going out" clothes and such like.

    It actually works well - she is starting to learn to not go nuts on her " pay-day" as she didn't like not being able to go to the cinema at the end of the month as she was skint .

    Based on the expenses you have listed, the amount you suggest seems fair. I would say though, it is really tough - you need to be very strong , as it is very easy to give into them when they want something that they haven't budgeted for, and we found at the start of this experiment that we ended up giving in for a quiet life - it took a few months to remember to say " oh Im sorry , that is something that is supposed to come out of your allowance".

    Edit - initially 80 seemed an awful lot to be handing over each month, just for entertainment etc, but when we worked it out, we were definately handing over more than 20 per week - " can i have a tenner to go pictures, a fiver to go swimming, mam I need foundation" and such like !
    Originally posted by jinty271
    It is a lot to hand over each month, but I also know I spend more than 140 on them each month by handing the odd 10, and funding clothes, bus fares and so on.

    I forgot to add that we have a system where they can earn bits of cash for doing extra chores like cleaning the car, vacuuming the stairs and we will continue with that. That and choosing to make packed lunches (or not) is their choice. OH and I take packed lunches to work and both work hard around the house at weekends, so the example is there.
    Fighting the biggest battle of my life. Started 30th January 2018.
    • torbrex
    • By torbrex 27th May 12, 7:37 AM
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    torbrex
    • #7
    • 27th May 12, 7:37 AM
    • #7
    • 27th May 12, 7:37 AM
    3.68 is the current minimum wage for a 16 year old so can I suggest that you could set up a work programme of household chores for them to do to earn an extra bit of cash rather than just giving it to them.
    It should be jobs that you or your VSG normally do and the little darlings are capable of doing if they really want the money.

    My parents did a similar thing with us 35 years ago when we got minimum pocket money and extra had to be earned eg if i cleaned the downstairs loo, I got an extra pound each week, cutting the grass or washing the car got me a pound from dad etc.


    ETA too late, you already do that
    • jayII
    • By jayII 27th May 12, 7:42 AM
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    jayII
    • #8
    • 27th May 12, 7:42 AM
    • #8
    • 27th May 12, 7:42 AM
    When I was 16/17 I used to get 1/week, which was the equivalent of one hour's work in my Saturday job. I had to pay for my lunch one day/week, all my shoes/clothes/hair cuts, my course materials, my exams and a monthly magazine that was a course requirement. I also had to pay for a lot of my college exams. It also had to pay for any socialising/travel I wanted to do myself.

    That's why I had to have a Saturday job and work in the holidays.
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    I know, how times have changed, I remember how proud I was of my Saturday job at 14/15!

    Things were so different back in the early 80's, I was expected to pay board from 16 onwards and it resulted in me dropping out of A-levels as at that age I couldn't cope with studying alongside all the hours of paid work I had to do to survive. I don't want my children to be under the same pressure that I was, but equally, I want them to learn money management and I don't want to spoil them.
    Fighting the biggest battle of my life. Started 30th January 2018.
    • jayII
    • By jayII 27th May 12, 7:52 AM
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    jayII
    • #9
    • 27th May 12, 7:52 AM
    • #9
    • 27th May 12, 7:52 AM
    Thanks everyone, it's really helpful to get different perspectives. It sounds as if we're being reasonable. According to my DD, the going rate should be a lot more, that's until I dig deeper and discover that only a couple of (much wealthier) girls in her class actually get the amount she is suggesting and many others get only a bare minimum!

    I think I'll stick with the 140, it's manageable for us and the teens should be able to cope okay.
    Fighting the biggest battle of my life. Started 30th January 2018.
    • jayII
    • By jayII 27th May 12, 8:14 AM
    • 38,158 Posts
    • 107,076 Thanks
    jayII
    3.68 is the current minimum wage for a 16 year old so can I suggest that you could set up a work programme of household chores for them to do to earn an extra bit of cash rather than just giving it to them.
    It should be jobs that you or your VSG normally do and the little darlings are capable of doing if they really want the money.

    My parents did a similar thing with us 35 years ago when we got minimum pocket money and extra had to be earned eg if i cleaned the downstairs loo, I got an extra pound each week, cutting the grass or washing the car got me a pound from dad etc.


    ETA too late, you already do that
    Originally posted by torbrex
    No worries, it's a good idea. I should have posted that we do that in my OP but I forgot. It doesn't seem to make any difference as the lazy so-and-so's rarely do those money earning chores. I suppose I give into their emotional blackmail too easily. They do generally help out otherwise whenever I ask them, so I can't really complain but I find their lack of initiative frustrating. I hope it will change under the new regime.
    Fighting the biggest battle of my life. Started 30th January 2018.
    • Alikay
    • By Alikay 27th May 12, 8:32 AM
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    Alikay
    I think the amount you're suggesting sounds fair, OP. A little bit over and above what they actually need is a good idea if they learn to set themselves up a bit of a "contingency fund" to cover extra expenses like Christmas, School holidays etc.

    We did similar with ours, and it worked reasonably well - one of our children managed fantastically, enjoyed the responsibility and is now great with finances at 23, the other 2 never entirely embraced the idea but have reluctantly come to accept it!
  • FATBALLZ
    Sounds like a lot to me. I remember having to have a heated row with my dad to have my allowance at that age increased from 5 to 10 a week, which is probably about the equivalent of 14 now. The weekend job I got shortly after paid around 200/mth for 15 hours/wk.

    So if you're going to give them so much I'd suggest at least making sure they do a vaguely proportional amount of work to earn it.
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 27th May 12, 9:02 AM
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    tori.k
    Since our eldest turned 16 and moved on to college we decided to hand over his child benefit and let him get on with it, we provide the roof over his head and food & college bus pass (our income excludes him from any concessions) but thats it if he needs something like new clothes or something for college he has to budget for them he also got himself a weekend job so gets around 65 a week all in.
    It's worked really well he sort's his own washing and and most of his own meals (often im heading off to work when he get's home from college) living a independant life at home where there is help if he needs it, giving him personal responsibility has had some great side effect's his best mate started smoking, my son's attitude was that he mad when he worked out how much his mate was paying each week for fags and decided it's not a habit he would want to emulate..lol
    He's also better at looking after his belongings now he has sole responsibility in replacing them.
    It's made him think ahead he wants to learn to drive so is putting some aside each week to make this happen.
    It's worked really well for us, and I worry less that when he does eventually move out of the family home that he will cope with the transition better
    • tiff
    • By tiff 27th May 12, 9:07 AM
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    tiff
    Mine gets an allowance till he's 16 when I expect him to get a part time job. He has been desperate to work and earn money since he was 13 so I hope the fact he has to wait till he's 16 doesnt change that.
    A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went. - Dave Ramsey
  • gibson123
    Each young person is different depending, if they have expensive hobbies or fees to pay they may need a bit more.

    My 13 year old gets 150 per month and has done for about 2 years, she buys everything with this including phone, school uniform and savings. She generally does very well at managing this allowance and it takes a lot of the "unknown" out of the household budget.

    We came to this sum by a process of negotiation, I wrote down everything i spend on her over a month ...210!! and she went off and did a spreadsheet with all her expenses, we then we agreed a budget.

    Her big expenses are ... music lessons - 10 per week, horse-riding - 18 and at this time of year school trips.. 35 to go to Blackpool.

    The main difference between pre-allowance and post allowance is that before when we went shopping she always picked up the most expensive items, now we invariably head to the charity shop or sales. Arguments have now ceased. She knows that her allowance will be withdrawn if it is ever spent on anything inappropriate.
    • Marisco
    • By Marisco 27th May 12, 9:14 AM
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    Marisco
    No worries, it's a good idea. I should have posted that we do that in my OP but I forgot. It doesn't seem to make any difference as the lazy so-and-so's rarely do those money earning chores. I suppose I give into their emotional blackmail too easily. They do generally help out otherwise whenever I ask them, so I can't really complain but I find their lack of initiative frustrating. I hope it will change under the new regime.
    Originally posted by jayII
    Try a different tack and say that if the jobs are not done, then money will be deducted every month, sort of like paying tax and NI.
  • poet123
    This thread has really made me think. We never gave any of our elder three an allowance. We just paid for all their needs as and when. They never really asked for much, maybe 10 for the cinema/ local under 17's disco etc, no huge amounts. We also paid for driving lessons as birthday presents, and bought electronic gadgets as xmas gifts. It actually never occurred to me to give them an allowance and they never asked.

    Now, we have a 15 year old he is the same, we pay for lunches at school 15 pw and he has probably 2 per day "walking money" aka buying rubbish on way home from school money!! Other than that he gets money for the cinema or microsoft points, and we pay for his other hobbies, which are table tennis, football and rugby. He is not very demanding moneywise and has quite a bit saved from xmas and birthday money.

    I think that how you handle money is personality dependent. Out of our four three are great with it and one is hopeless. The one who is hopeless had the most money to play with as he chose to have a part time job from being 16, whilst the others managed on what we gave them and studied more (?) instead.

    Interesting thread though.
    Last edited by poet123; 27-05-2012 at 9:35 AM. Reason: typo
  • gibson123
    No worries, it's a good idea. I should have posted that we do that in my OP but I forgot. It doesn't seem to make any difference as the lazy so-and-so's rarely do those money earning chores. I suppose I give into their emotional blackmail too easily. They do generally help out otherwise whenever I ask them, so I can't really complain but I find their lack of initiative frustrating. I hope it will change under the new regime.
    Originally posted by jayII
    Expecting teenagers to have initiative ....

    They don't understand this, every teenager I have ever met is entirely self-centred and self obsessed, its all me me me. They will only take action when it impacts directly on them. So unless you use reward and punishment you haven't a hope. I am reliably informed by my older sisters, that they do grow out of this self obsession and in the meantime I am an angel of patience and serenity whilst quietly seething inside.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 27th May 12, 9:41 AM
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    silvercar
    We give 100 a month plus pay for his mobile phone contract and lunch money. We also put petrol in the car as he now drives himself to and from school.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 27th May 12, 10:00 AM
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    Mojisola
    I forgot to add that we have a system where they can earn bits of cash for doing extra chores like cleaning the car, vacuuming the stairs and we will continue with that. That and choosing to make packed lunches (or not) is their choice. OH and I take packed lunches to work and both work hard around the house at weekends, so the example is there.
    Originally posted by jayII
    So Mum and Dad work hard round the house - does anyone pay you?

    Kids aged 15 and 16 can do jobs but get paid for them and usually are too lazy to bother?

    There are basically four adults in the house and two of them have servants!

    Youngsters of that age should be sharing the household jobs. I never got into paying our kids for chores round the house - we all live there, we all make mess, want to eat, etc, so we all help with the work but, as you're starting from that position, I would give a very limited allowance and then the rest is earned.

    You also need to add the proviso that the job is done when it needs to be done without any moaning. Grumbling or delaying chores leads to a reduction in pay.
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