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  • FIRST POST
    • MissG
    • By MissG 12th Jan 07, 6:28 PM
    • 857Posts
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    MissG
    tips on painting a radiator needed
    • #1
    • 12th Jan 07, 6:28 PM
    tips on painting a radiator needed 12th Jan 07 at 6:28 PM
    I am going to paint my radiator with ronseal radiator paint, any tips on the best way to apply it. It does say it doesnít leave brush marks but so did the tile paint and that left brush marks, I used a roller which sorted that problem out. I was going to use a roller but I would imagine it to be difficult to do due to lumps and bumps of a radiator. any tips would be appreciated
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  • thekid
    • #2
    • 12th Jan 07, 6:35 PM
    • #2
    • 12th Jan 07, 6:35 PM
    use a foam(gloss) roller.

    I would say I've yet to see a painted radiator that looks half decent.

    good luck

    btk
    All advice given by thekid is in good faith but remember these important facts:
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    2. My motto is "What's the worst that can happen" you've seen the kids in the Comic Relief clips, is it to that scale? Then get a grip!
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    4. I'm only a plumber...
    thekid
  • brindles01
    • #3
    • 12th Jan 07, 6:36 PM
    • #3
    • 12th Jan 07, 6:36 PM
    I don't want to worry you but I found thaty particular paint vile to work with and did not like the results. I pride myself on being quite a tidy painter and was annoyed with it. I now stick to white emulsion for my rads if they need a freshen up. Practise with it first if you can, would be my advice.
    • MissG
    • By MissG 12th Jan 07, 6:50 PM
    • 857 Posts
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    MissG
    • #4
    • 12th Jan 07, 6:50 PM
    • #4
    • 12th Jan 07, 6:50 PM
    Thatís what I used on the tiles a gloss roller, came up better than a brush.

    The radiators have all ready been painted before we moved in but I don't know what type of paint was used, they don't look that bad apart from the colour.

    Where you annoyed by the way the paint looked after applying or just with the paint in general?

    I didnít think you could use normal emulsion, I could be wrong?

    Thanks for the tips so far I really appreciate it.
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  • misgrace
    • #5
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:14 PM
    • #5
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:14 PM
    use a foam(gloss) roller.

    I would say I've yet to see a painted radiator that looks half decent.

    good luck

    btk
    by thekid
    You havent see mine then

    MissG, dont use the radiator paint, its awful, I used it once, and never again, I use the old fashioned undercoat and gloss, or satinwood.

    Can you tell if the rad paint is matt or shiny?, if they used emulsion it should be peeling off by now.

    If you want to go back to white, then undercoat over the colour, depending on how dark the colour is then do 2, then either do your top coat gloss, eggshell or satinwood, and all paint for rads must be oilbased.

    If you want the rad to match the colour of your wall, then undercoat, and buy a small tin of the colour in satinwood or eggshell, any diy store or decorating shop will mix it, even oilbase, and apply 2 coats of the satin or eggshell, but only do 1 coat of gloss, if you choose gloss.
    • nearlyrich
    • By nearlyrich 12th Jan 07, 7:32 PM
    • 13,335 Posts
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    nearlyrich
    • #6
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:32 PM
    • #6
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:32 PM
    We used an eggshell "gloss" in the same colour as the wall for our rads and they look good, never had success with emulsion it tends to rub off.
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    • Raksha
    • By Raksha 12th Jan 07, 7:45 PM
    • 4,518 Posts
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    Raksha
    • #7
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:45 PM
    • #7
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:45 PM
    I've used radiator paint with some success in the kitchen, I found the secret was very thin coats, and several of them. To be honest, although it looks OK, the time taken would probably have been better spent on ordinary gloss repainted after a couple of years.
    • MissG
    • By MissG 12th Jan 07, 7:48 PM
    • 857 Posts
    • 587 Thanks
    MissG
    • #8
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:48 PM
    • #8
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:48 PM
    You havent see mine then

    MissG, dont use the radiator paint, its awful, I used it once, and never again, I use the old fashioned undercoat and gloss, or satinwood.

    Can you tell if the rad paint is matt or shiny?, if they used emulsion it should be peeling off by now.

    If you want to go back to white, then undercoat over the colour, depending on how dark the colour is then do 2, then either do your top coat gloss, eggshell or satinwood, and all paint for rads must be oilbased.

    If you want the rad to match the colour of your wall, then undercoat, and buy a small tin of the colour in satinwood or eggshell, any diy store or decorating shop will mix it, even oilbase, and apply 2 coats of the satin or eggshell, but only do 1 coat of gloss, if you choose gloss.
    by misgrace

    I think it's a matt as the isn't much of a shine but I could be wrong.

    It is peeling in only a couple of place on all 3 radiators. We have lived in the flat for 4 1/2 years so the condition is quite good considering.

    The current colour is a dirty white / light beige ish colour but I just don't like it and want them to be pure white.

    Would I need to use an undercoat as it's been painted before, im not on top form about painting

    What type of paint would be best, I want the radiator to be not shiny but not dull, I don't want to see my face in it.
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    • Mikeyorks
    • By Mikeyorks 12th Jan 07, 7:51 PM
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    Mikeyorks
    • #9
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:51 PM
    • #9
    • 12th Jan 07, 7:51 PM
    Emulsion isn't suitable for radiators - but satinwood works well. And, if the same colour as skirtings / doors / frames .. helps the radiators blend in rather than stand out.

    Personally wouldn't use the dedicated radiator paint. In this case it tends to not do as it says on the tin.
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    • Stompa
    • By Stompa 12th Jan 07, 7:53 PM
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    Stompa
    I once painted a radiator with radiator paint (not sure if it was Ronseal). The paint had a fairly unpleasant smell which persisted for months.
    Stompa
  • ScoobieGirl
    Make sure the radiators are cold before you start.

    I agree a good quality satinwood is great. I've done mine in it and 5 years down the line they are lovely (no brush marks either). I even did a few in the Dulux mix-in-the-shop type satinwood so they would blend in with the walls.

    You shouldn't need an undercoat, but you may need some primer if you can see any bare metal eg chips along the top.

    • MissG
    • By MissG 12th Jan 07, 8:11 PM
    • 857 Posts
    • 587 Thanks
    MissG
    Make sure the radiators are cold before you start.

    I agree a good quality satinwood is great. I've done mine in it and 5 years down the line they are lovely (no brush marks either). I even did a few in the Dulux mix-in-the-shop type satinwood so they would blend in with the walls.

    You shouldn't need an undercoat, but you may need some primer if you can see any bare metal eg chips along the top.
    by ScoobieGirl
    Can you get a 2 in 1, primer and undercoat in one as the is 1 or 2 places it is down to the metal?
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  • ScoobieGirl
    Yes you can. You can also get both multi purpose & metal primer & undercoat. I think the multipurpose wasn't quite as opaque as the dedicated one. But I guess it depends what other DIY tasks you've got coming up if it's worth buying

    • mallymal
    • By mallymal 12th Jan 07, 9:39 PM
    • 204 Posts
    • 108 Thanks
    mallymal
    Try an aerosol rad paint = but ventilate well as it's horrid to breath in.

    Leaves no marks, and is easy to get in the grooves.

    Just don't pile it mon too heavy in one place or it will sag & run.

    Did my daughter's last year... great result!
  • Avoriaz
    I have painted many radiators with ordinary gloss or satin paint without any problems. In theory white gloss can fade and discolour from the heat but I have never had a problem. I usually use colour matched paint and that has never faded.

    I use a normal brush, very lightly loaded and applied very carefully to cold radiators. Most streaking and runs are caused by overloading the brush. I donít like or use rollers so I canít comment.

    Start at one end of the radiator and paint down in a strip a few inches wide from top to bottom. Then start again at the top a few inches along. Keep a wet vertical edge, never overload the brush and brush well in. Keep checking for runs and smooth them out with an unloaded brush. Two or three very thin coats are better than one thick coat.

    Let the paint dry for a few days before using the radiator.

    Donít attempt to use emulsion, it wonít work. (edit, shown73 and others disagree with me. . I donít think it gives as good a finish as gloss or satin oil based paint but, as the yanks say, your mileage may differ)
    Last edited by Avoriaz; 13-01-2007 at 3:15 PM.
    • MissG
    • By MissG 12th Jan 07, 11:17 PM
    • 857 Posts
    • 587 Thanks
    MissG
    Try an aerosol rad paint = but ventilate well as it's horrid to breath in.

    Leaves no marks, and is easy to get in the grooves.

    Just don't pile it mon too heavy in one place or it will sag & run.

    Did my daughter's last year... great result!
    by mallymal
    We couldn't use an aerosol as we have a parrot and not many rooms to move about in.
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    • MissG
    • By MissG 12th Jan 07, 11:23 PM
    • 857 Posts
    • 587 Thanks
    MissG
    Let the paint dry for a few days before using the radiator.
    by Avoriaz

    A few days , it's freezing in our flat with no heating on, I was going to leave it a day. The other day with the winds our pilot light on the boiler went out and I don't have a clue how to light it so I had to wait for my partner to come home and light it, by then I had a thick dressing gown on as I was freezing.
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    • shown73
    • By shown73 13th Jan 07, 12:13 AM
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    • 403 Thanks
    shown73
    All I can say is that over many years I've been painting radiators, to blend in with the decor, and I've never had to use specialist paints. Look at the variety, and price, in the DIY shops now, whatever did we do before? What a rip-off. Don't let anyone say that you can't use emulsion, or anything else. I've sprayed, glossed, satined, emulsioned, you name it. Never had a problem, even painting over one kind with another. Heating on the same day, no problem, helps it to dry quicker, and I've never had a problem with flaking, or anything else. Gloss pongs a bit when heated and drying, but nothing drastic, and anyway, it's a fresh paint smell. Don't listen to the anoraks, go for it, if you don't like it, you can easily change it, and after all, it's not supposed to last for ever, in a few years you will want a change.
  • Avoriaz
    The reason I said “Let the paint dry for a few days before using the radiator.” is to allow the paint to dry slowly and not overpower you with the smell. As Shown73 posts above, "Gloss pongs a bit when heated".

    If you can take the smell, turn the heat on after a few hours.

    You might get a headache from the fumes.

    Shown73, maybe you can use emulsion, but I doubt if you can get a decent and lasting finish with it. Oil based gloss is much better and the price difference for a few radiators is negligible.
    Last edited by Avoriaz; 13-01-2007 at 2:16 AM.
    • greyteam1959
    • By greyteam1959 13th Jan 07, 12:52 PM
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    greyteam1959
    Yes I agree with Shown73
    I used specialist radiator paint many years ago right load of expensive smelly c**p.
    I have used all sorts of paints but if you are worried look on the tins.Its will say if it is suitable for radiators.
    If I was MissG I would take the rad paint back for a refund !!
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