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  • John 3:16
    • #2
    • 6th Sep 11, 6:40 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Sep 11, 6:40 PM
    Apart from the constant problem of tar build up in the chimney, I don't think you will be able to keep it alight?
    Is there no where you could store it?
    Even making a deal with someone and going half each on the timber?
    • A. Badger
    • By A. Badger 6th Sep 11, 9:26 PM
    • 5,265 Posts
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    A. Badger
    • #3
    • 6th Sep 11, 9:26 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Sep 11, 9:26 PM
    I'm not an expert (Muckybutt will know the answer if he reads this) but I'd say be very careful. It's not just a question of soot, as tar and creosote-like substances are released by green wood and they condense. I'm not sure how well that residue can be cleaned away with brushes.
    • rustyboy21
    • By rustyboy21 7th Sep 11, 2:59 AM
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    rustyboy21
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 11, 2:59 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Sep 11, 2:59 AM
    There are a number of factors involved with burning non seasoned wood.

    One is that it is damp, so will not stay lit constantly

    The major factors though are that they contain the sap of the wood, Heat will make the resins in the wood come out, which is a tarry like substance. Not only is it corrosive to the stove itself , but it will also leave tarry like substances in your flue. Over a period of time, these will erode the lining of your flue and destroy the mortar leading to possible dangerous fumes, entering other rooms in your house, or even entering your neighbours houses.

    Also whilst on the subject, anyone who has or is thinking about purchasing a solid fuel( or Multi fuel ) stove, please do not burn normal house coal on them. House coal does not burn at a constant temperature, contains a lot of other chemicals and will ruin your stove over a period of time.

    I have not heard of a single Stove supplier who warranty's for the use of house coal in their stoves. You should only use coke.
  • highrisklowreturn
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 11, 12:18 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Sep 11, 12:18 PM
    How many years are we talking about till tar builds up to a dangerous level - I would like to get this winter in with unseasoned wood, and can then start foraging throughout the year for wood which can then be (reasonably) dried by leaving out in the yard with a cover on it.
    • grahamc2003
    • By grahamc2003 7th Sep 11, 1:14 PM
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    grahamc2003
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 11, 1:14 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Sep 11, 1:14 PM
    Bad idea imo, depending on how damp it is of course.

    You'll have difficulty lighting wet wood, and even if you manage to get some sort of fire going, it won't get very hot, much of the heat being used to boil off the water. And you'll be getting acidic water condensing in you chimney, along with all the other crud described in other posts.

    Ime, for my normal sized logs, even one year dried wood is just on the limit of being burnable (efficiently), much better if stored dry, uncovered, for 18 months or more.
    • oldtractor
    • By oldtractor 7th Sep 11, 2:04 PM
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    oldtractor
    • #7
    • 7th Sep 11, 2:04 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Sep 11, 2:04 PM
    I've burned unseasoned logs but wouldnt recommend it. they do burn but ,as stated above,can damage the chimney lining. if you have acces to green wood its a good idea to get it then store it for a year or more undercover. it will then be dry.
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 7th Sep 11, 2:21 PM
    • 3,738 Posts
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    martinthebandit
    • #8
    • 7th Sep 11, 2:21 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Sep 11, 2:21 PM
    Well, despite what others have said, it all depends on what you mean by unseasoned and on what type of wood.

    In reality it is perfectly doable although, unless you have no outside space then I would be suprised if you didn't have room to store some.

    Can the place you are getting the timber from not rent you somewhere to store it for a nominal fee?

    If you don't find joy in the snow,
    remember you'll have less joy in your life


    ...but still have the same amount of snow!
    • rustyboy21
    • By rustyboy21 7th Sep 11, 5:45 PM
    • 2,506 Posts
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    rustyboy21
    • #9
    • 7th Sep 11, 5:45 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Sep 11, 5:45 PM
    I still think that 3/4 of the people who by wood burning stoves, don't buy the seasoned wood only

    Do you remember the times when there used to be old pallets dumped everywhere? Something you don't see anymore.

    A neighbour up the road from me years ago came running up my path one night, banging o nthe door saying their chimney was on fire. It transpired that when the fire engine got there , he had been burning all his old kitchen worktops and doors on it. The thing that made it go up however, was an old pair of wellies he had thrown on to get rid of! He had a battle with insurance, who wouldn't pay out.

    Statistics from the gas appliance coucil are showing that solid fuel is peaking now and more people are going back to the old days of gas fires, Hopefully it continues, for us fire retailers ! lol
  • highrisklowreturn
    Could you not leave the unseasoned wood beside the stove to speed up drying?

    Also what about the Victorians, I mean would they not have burned unseasoned wood and stuff?
  • 782sirbrian
    House coal can be burned on a Dunsley Yorkshire reading the paperwork. Not in a smoke control area though.
    Burning green/wet wood a waste of time no heat, chimney running in tar, stack the logs outdoors under a cover for a year or two to dry out.
    Brian
    Last edited by 782sirbrian; 24-09-2011 at 5:15 PM.
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 24th Sep 11, 5:07 PM
    • 30,390 Posts
    • 77,994 Thanks
    Mojisola
    Am looking to get a woodburner and the wood I could get is free, but unseasoned. I've nowhere to store it so cannot season it personally but am attracted to getting a woodburner because of free heat.
    Originally posted by highrisklowreturn
    If you don't have room to store wood, you shouldn't bother getting a woodburner. You need enough room to store your free collected wood or else enough space to buy a load of wood. If you have to buy it in small lots, it will work out very expensive.
    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 24th Sep 11, 6:59 PM
    • 3,618 Posts
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    muckybutt
    Question: Should this ever be done?


    Am looking to get a woodburner and the wood I could get is free, but unseasoned. I've nowhere to store it so cannot season it personally but am attracted to getting a woodburner because of free heat.

    If I got the chimney swept more often than usual wood this deal with any issues from 'wet' wood?


    Thanks in advance
    Originally posted by highrisklowreturn
    NONONONO !

    Worst possible thing you can do is burn wet / unseasoned wood.

    You will get dangerous build up of tar and creosote within weeks if not days !

    I have personally known a 6" flue get blocked in a week, swept and smoke tested the week before then get a call 6 days later to say its smoking heavily, get there and the flue was completely blocked up with tar as was the baffle inside the stove and the stove walls. It took 3 hours to gently chip away at the tar to even get a flue brush inside.

    The problem is the wet wood will produce steam, this steam as it rises condenses and this is when tar and creosote will be produced. All it takes is a spark and you'll have a fire on your hands, that or you run the risk of CO poisoning from inadequate draught.

    For a wood burner you need storage for the wood, ideally season it for 18 months if its "green" when you buy it, seasoned wood still needs to be kept dry in a shelter where the air can get to it to stop it getting damp.

    Even getting it swept more regularly is not the answer !

    I would'nt even advocate burning unseasoned / wet wood in an unlined chimney.

    I could go on but be warned NEVER EVER BURN UNSEASONED WOOD
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    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 24th Sep 11, 7:06 PM
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    muckybutt
    I'm not an expert (Muckybutt will know the answer if he reads this) but I'd say be very careful. It's not just a question of soot, as tar and creosote-like substances are released by green wood and they condense. I'm not sure how well that residue can be cleaned away with brushes.
    Originally posted by A. Badger
    You never get the residue away with just brushes, you can get the "crispy stuff" cleaned away...eventually but the creosote stays in a very thin layer / film, what I always do when I get a bad one is when its been cleaned I always say to light a hot fire and use a couple of sachets of chimney imp flue and chimney cleaner. Then get it swept again a week or so later, comes out like dust then and leaves everything nice and clean....well as nice and clean as you can get in a chimney.
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
  • highrisklowreturn
    Do these rules apply to open fires?

    I have to say I have personally felled several ash trees recently, and have been poppin 3-5 logs at a time into my oven and drying them there after having split them. This has reduced the moisture content of the centre part of the wood to 22-28% from 34-38%; the outer-middle bits of the log to around 18-25%; and the sides of the logs to under 15% moisture.

    I assume these are good to be burnt? I have to add that I'm simply doing this by having them in at the same time as I'm cooking the dinner, so it normally takes two nights to get the wood to this moisture level (ie two dinners-worth: The heat stays in the oven for maybe 60-90 minutes after a 15-30 minute run).
    • Swipe
    • By Swipe 24th Sep 11, 7:36 PM
    • 2,238 Posts
    • 1,186 Thanks
    Swipe
    Just buy some seasoned wood and save the recently felled ash for next winter
    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 24th Sep 11, 7:56 PM
    • 3,618 Posts
    • 3,419 Thanks
    muckybutt
    Do these rules apply to open fires?

    I have to say I have personally felled several ash trees recently, and have been poppin 3-5 logs at a time into my oven and drying them there after having split them. This has reduced the moisture content of the centre part of the wood to 22-28% from 34-38%; the outer-middle bits of the log to around 18-25%; and the sides of the logs to under 15% moisture.

    I assume these are good to be burnt? I have to add that I'm simply doing this by having them in at the same time as I'm cooking the dinner, so it normally takes two nights to get the wood to this moisture level (ie two dinners-worth: The heat stays in the oven for maybe 60-90 minutes after a 15-30 minute run).
    Originally posted by highrisklowreturn
    Yes same rules apply to normal chimeys, only today was re-educating a chap on the burnung of unseasoned wood, showed him the tar clumps I got down ....just waiting for a spark to start a chimney fire.

    Ideally get the whole log down to 18% or less, the drier the better. Different way of drying out your wood though....never heard of that before....kiln drying goes diy lol
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
    • mysterons
    • By mysterons 24th Sep 11, 8:17 PM
    • 131 Posts
    • 112 Thanks
    mysterons
    This,
    http://www.hobbyfarming.co.uk/firewood.html

    The two old rhymes suggest Ash is ok to burn recently felled.
    I should point out that last winter caught us out and we needed a load of logs delivered at the end of January as we'd run out. That delivery was very wet and though it did burn if given a lot of attention there was little heat given off.
    • muckybutt
    • By muckybutt 24th Sep 11, 8:25 PM
    • 3,618 Posts
    • 3,419 Thanks
    muckybutt
    This,
    http://www.hobbyfarming.co.uk/firewood.html

    The two old rhymes suggest Ash is ok to burn recently felled.
    I should point out that last winter caught us out and we needed a load of logs delivered at the end of January as we'd run out. That delivery was very wet and though it did burn if given a lot of attention there was little heat given off.
    Originally posted by mysterons
    OH DEAR ! I GIVE UP
    You may click thanks if you found my advice useful
  • highrisklowreturn
    I'm hopefully going to get the woodburner in next week - so I'll be testing the efficacy of oven-dried wood. I know this sounds too simple a way of doing things to be true but I believe it works. I also think if you shave the bark off wood before doing this your results jump massively as the bark holds the moisture in tight and reduces surface exposure by the wood to the oven heat.

    As I said, one oven run of 30 minutes gives you several hours heat into the wood. You can't get the wood to 0% moisture so why !!!! yourself trying? If some bits are 25-35, others 15-25, and some bits 5-15% you're doing good in averaging out the moisture that's likely to be kicked out in the stove.
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