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  • FIRST POST
    • Former MSE Wendy
    • By Former MSE Wendy 15th Feb 11, 4:21 PM
    • 868Posts
    • 1,782Thanks
    Former MSE Wendy
    30 ways to stop scams article discussion
    • #1
    • 15th Feb 11, 4:21 PM
    30 ways to stop scams article discussion 15th Feb 11 at 4:21 PM
    This thread is specifically to discuss the content of the article



    To discuss or ask a question just click 'reply'. Thanks!
    Last edited by Former MSE Andrea; 01-07-2015 at 12:02 PM.
Page 1
  • triticale
    • #2
    • 16th Feb 11, 2:19 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Feb 11, 2:19 PM
    Number 6 and 16 are very important I think.

    So many people 'trust' google to not return dodgy websites - fact is they don't care. 'Sponsored links' are the worst, I have to remind family members to ignore those top 3 or so results.

    With regards to Googling 'Company Name Complaints' - if everybody did this beforehand then there wouldn't be half the angry posts from people on here. So often the company they come on here to rant about, has other complaints on this forum coming up on the first page of google!
  • Freddie_Snowbits
    • #3
    • 16th Feb 11, 2:56 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Feb 11, 2:56 PM
    Very good.

    1. On Free anti virus software, you do get what you pay for!
    2. On 'False links', it would be handy to note that the site the link takes you to is noted on the bottom left of your browser window, though names such as www.bbc.co.uk.humped.lostme.money.com/showcon.html may indicate it starts with BBC, but the handle at the end is a diferent site. (Note the link is unlisted as the site does not exist!)

    Though Freddie is reversed about fake uggg boats, if it is tooooooooooooooooooo cheap, it probably is!
    Last edited by Freddie_Snowbits; 16-02-2011 at 2:59 PM.
    • brush-head©
    • By brush-head© 16th Feb 11, 4:51 PM
    • 21 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    brush-head©
    • #4
    • 16th Feb 11, 4:51 PM
    • #4
    • 16th Feb 11, 4:51 PM
    It's not quite the same as number 4 but I've recently switched to Virgin Media for BB & 'phone (yes I know they're not the cheapest but with all the money I've saved over the years I thought I'd splash out! ha!ha!) & I have been asked a number of times for my "My Virgin Media" web site password (it is also the access point into their web & GMail based e-mail). I've just refused to answer - I hasten to add my calls to them for support etc. So I've asked them each time to ask me something else like my postcode (shared with umpteen neighbours) & one ore two other things.
    They're the only company I've come across that do this. When I challenged one of them one time I was told it was to do with data protection, which is poppycock. Apart from anything else if they're using CLI systems & I hope they would do, then they can see the telephone number no problem etc etc. There are plenty of other pieces of data they can check against.
    The meek will inherit the earth - except for the mineral rights. John Paul Getty.
  • Malcolm Oliver
    • #5
    • 29th Dec 11, 7:15 PM
    An extra security tip
    • #5
    • 29th Dec 11, 7:15 PM
    Decent anti-virus and anti-spyware software (and the free ones are actually pretty good) should keep you fairly safe, but there is a risk of keylogging software that might get onto your system, which could then record your passwords as you enter them.

    A simple way to avoid this is to keep a word-processing file (not labelled Password!) on a memory stick with your log-in details and passwords noted. To be ultra-safe, you can "hide" these amongst other words and numbers, and of course you can password-protect the file as well.

    Then, instead of keying in the details (which could be logged), just copy the relevant info from the memory stick file and paste it into the website. Once you get used to it, it is actually quicker than typing stuff in, as well as safer.
  • Queries
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 12, 9:59 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Mar 12, 9:59 PM
    Watch out for the 0906 scam! This is re-appearing. A card posted through your door saying that the've been unable to deliver a package and to call a 0906 number. Courier firms usually use a 0870, 0871 or 0844, 0845 numbers. 0906 numbers are premium line numbers. apparently this is no few pounds per call ones but can actually be as expensive as £315 for a single call! Watch out!
    • ashleypride
    • By ashleypride 11th Mar 12, 10:29 PM
    • 609 Posts
    • 690 Thanks
    ashleypride
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 12, 10:29 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Mar 12, 10:29 PM
    Watch out for the 0906 scam! This is re-appearing. A card posted through your door saying that the've been unable to deliver a package and to call a 0906 number. Courier firms usually use a 0870, 0871 or 0844, 0845 numbers. 0906 numbers are premium line numbers. apparently this is no few pounds per call ones but can actually be as expensive as £315 for a single call! Watch out!
    Originally posted by Queries
    Please not again, the scam is the chain letter.

    http://www.crimestoppers-uk.org/fraud/types-of-fraud/common-scams/postal-scam-email-from-parcel-delivery-service-65455465
    • Former MSE Andrea
    • By Former MSE Andrea 1st Jul 15, 12:01 PM
    • 9,418 Posts
    • 22,339 Thanks
    Former MSE Andrea
    • #8
    • 1st Jul 15, 12:01 PM
    • #8
    • 1st Jul 15, 12:01 PM
    Hi everyone!

    July is Scams Awareness Month so we're bumping this up.

    Have a good read of the guide to make sure you're scam aware and follow Citizens Advice on twitter and on the #scamaware hashtag to keep up to date on what's going on.
    Could you do with a Money Makeover?


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    • JJ Egan
    • By JJ Egan 1st Jul 15, 12:34 PM
    • 13,336 Posts
    • 6,090 Thanks
    JJ Egan
    • #9
    • 1st Jul 15, 12:34 PM
    • #9
    • 1st Jul 15, 12:34 PM
    Pity its not SPAM awareness month .
    • Kernow666
    • By Kernow666 1st Jul 15, 1:11 PM
    • 3,380 Posts
    • 3,133 Thanks
    Kernow666
    common sense is the most important
    but alas in this day & age people are lacking it in abundance
    "If I know I'm going crazy, I must not be insane"
  • geerex
    Step 1: use your brain. Don't just sign up to something by clicking blindly then go crying about it when you inevitably get charged. Hence the Amazon prime thread.
    • vikingaero
    • By vikingaero 1st Jul 15, 7:35 PM
    • 10,445 Posts
    • 13,132 Thanks
    vikingaero
    Google is your friend to see if email addresses, telephone numbers and scam descriptions are genuine.

    Emails: A lot of the time the same email address is used and will have been reported somewhere online.

    Telephone numbers: Once again others will have reported spam/scam numbers. You can often see if google shows the number belonging to a genuine company who may have tried to call you. Mobile numbers can also be reported by the public.

    Scam descriptions: Google what you think the scam is: "Microsoft calling me to remove a virus from my PC..." or "Colonel Sanders leaves me $700m in his will held by The Bank of Nigeria."

    Scam emails are easy to ignore or place in your junk file. Persistent telephone calls are harder to deal with. My advice to those dealing with scam or spam calls is to change your attitude towards them. Don't get angry and politely decline. Then on the next call get even. Give false but believable details, false card numbers etc.On the third call, answer the call but mute the speaker and carry on with your home life. Finish the washing up and then replace the handset. For every call you take you are doing a public service in wasting a scammers time.
    The man without a signature.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 1st Jul 15, 9:15 PM
    • 8,990 Posts
    • 7,053 Thanks
    esuhl
    There are 1,000s of ways scammers try to catch you out. Common methods include:
    • Fake psychics.

    A fake psychic?! It's the genuine ones you've got to watch out for -- they can see you coming.
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 1st Jul 15, 9:28 PM
    • 5,352 Posts
    • 6,142 Thanks
    robatwork
    Gotta also watch for the magicians who just use sleight of hand and not real magic, astrologers who just make it up a bit, and diviners, dowsers and seers. I'm looking at YOU Uri.
    • Cornucopia
    • By Cornucopia 1st Jul 15, 9:43 PM
    • 13,427 Posts
    • 16,275 Thanks
    Cornucopia
    I think it's a shame that MSE isn't taking a more campaigning line on this.

    Scams seem to be more widespread than ever before, and it isn't just vulnerable people who fall for them (though it's sad when they do).

    One of the issues is a weakness in the Law and in law enforcement. I appreciate that there can sometimes be a fairly narrow line between a scam and a legitimate business that is being badly run. However, from a consumer point of view, perhaps there is no need to distinguish between them at the early stages of enforcement?

    Scams and other rogue trading are a nuisance to our society, and act to make people less likely to believe official communications that they receive. Obviously organisations like HMRC/Concentrix, the PPCs and BBC/TV Licensing have their own role in all of this in terms of telling the public things that aren't entirely true, or making demands that don't have any legal basis.
    I'm a Board Guide on the Phones & TV, Techie Stuff, In My Home,
    The Money Savers Arms and Food Shopping boards. I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly, and I can move and merge threads there. Any views (especially those on the UK TV Licence) are mine and not the official line of moneysavingexpert.com.

    Board guides are not moderators. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com
    • Martinp
    • By Martinp 26th Oct 15, 7:21 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Martinp
    New phony BT broadband service scam
    I was phoned this morning by someone claiming to work for BT who said he had received error messages via my router telling him that my braodband had a virus and was not working properly. (as it happens it wasn't)
    this seems similar to the "Windows error messages scam" where they take control of your computer to fix the problem.
    He was very good. Got me running a windows tool that chaecks th ecomputer to identify & remove malicious software. Then took me t the BT site. He gave me a full name, telephone number in London & his job title.
    Then onto another site - pcdoctor website (can't provide link - not allowed!)
    This was about where I terminated the call as I had no wish to hand control of my PC ot an unknown third party. Apart from following the advice on forums such as this the best way to stop these scammers is make sure people know about it. (I contacted BT & told them about it - they confirmed that they do not make outbound calls of the type I described here)
    • enfield freddy
    • By enfield freddy 26th Oct 15, 8:29 PM
    • 5,919 Posts
    • 3,909 Thanks
    enfield freddy
    you were correct to terminate the call , they (bt) have no way of knowing if you have a virus , if your machine is chucking out nasty emails all day and causing problems , they would just pull your plug
    • boo_star
    • By boo_star 26th Oct 15, 8:40 PM
    • 2,631 Posts
    • 1,971 Thanks
    boo_star
    you were correct to terminate the call , they (bt) have no way of knowing if you have a virus , if your machine is chucking out nasty emails all day and causing problems , they would just pull your plug
    Originally posted by enfield freddy
    Most ISPs block port 25 for exactly this reason, so they wouldn't need to pull the plug, the emails won't go anyway.
    • MoveOver
    • By MoveOver 3rd Jun 16, 7:07 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    MoveOver
    StopScam 7
    Stop Scam tip 7 My credit card Maximum was £500 and I needed to pay £1800. So I used my debit card. The business was criminal but my Bank (HSBC) did act on my behalf. After the money back cheque was bounced the Bank stepped in again and this time I got my money. Thank you HSBC.
    • MoveOver
    • By MoveOver 3rd Jun 16, 7:18 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    MoveOver
    See Number 5
    When is an email genuine? My ISP sends monthly emails that link to my Bill. Their Emails are titled "Support".

    Usually I check the source and it is genuine. Last time though it took me to a scam site. I cancelled immediately but to date I have received 87 more scam emails in one month from 3 sources.

    I alerted my Bank and asked them to phone me if anyone requested payment of £100 or more. They refused to do that.
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