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  • FIRST POST
    Bryony84
    Uncovered central heating pipes in house.
    • #1
    • 25th Jan 11, 10:31 PM
    Uncovered central heating pipes in house. 25th Jan 11 at 10:31 PM
    Just had a look round a potential rental property and the one thing that stood out to me as odd was that all the central heating pipes were exposed, running from the radiators up the walls to the next radiator upstairs. They were partially secured to the walls with plastic fixings but some were loose.

    Its not something I've ever see before so I was wondering how safe it is. These pipes get pretty hot and you could easily burn yourself on them (or other people/visiting children etc could).

    Just wondered if there are any regulations with such things?
Page 1
  • BitterAndTwisted
    • #2
    • 25th Jan 11, 10:36 PM
    • #2
    • 25th Jan 11, 10:36 PM
    It's not uncommon especially in older properties. There should be a control on the boiler to regulate the temperature of the water in the pipes if you're worried about children getting burned.
    • Toiletduck
    • By Toiletduck 25th Jan 11, 10:38 PM
    • 181 Posts
    • 55 Thanks
    Toiletduck
    • #3
    • 25th Jan 11, 10:38 PM
    • #3
    • 25th Jan 11, 10:38 PM
    Just had a look round a potential rental property and the one thing that stood out to me as odd was that all the central heating pipes were exposed, running from the radiators up the walls to the next radiator upstairs. They were partially secured to the walls with plastic fixings but some were loose.

    Its not something I've ever see before so I was wondering how safe it is. These pipes get pretty hot and you could easily burn yourself on them (or other people/visiting children etc could).

    Just wondered if there are any regulations with such things?
    Originally posted by Bryony84
    They might be hot but they couldnt ever be hotter than the radiators themselves which are much easier to come into contact with! Its just a very cheap installation - landlord job.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 25th Jan 11, 10:57 PM
    • 45,571 Posts
    • 54,809 Thanks
    G_M
    • #4
    • 25th Jan 11, 10:57 PM
    • #4
    • 25th Jan 11, 10:57 PM
    They might be hot but they couldnt ever be hotter than the radiators themselves which are much easier to come into contact with! Its just a very cheap installation - landlord job.
    Originally posted by Toiletduck
    Or Warmfront subsidy. Warmfron installations never run the pipes under the floor nor within casing - that costs extra.

    Homebase/Wickes are selling 5 x 1m lengths of pipe insulation for 1.99. Bargain.
  • clutton
    • #5
    • 25th Jan 11, 11:36 PM
    • #5
    • 25th Jan 11, 11:36 PM
    ""Its just a very cheap installation - landlord job.""

    or a house with solid flooring downstairs...... landlord houses and property owner houses....
    Last edited by clutton; 26-01-2011 at 12:41 AM.
  • tbs624
    • #6
    • 26th Jan 11, 12:38 AM
    • #6
    • 26th Jan 11, 12:38 AM
    If the visible pipework is running up the walls and through the ceiling to the floor above (as described by the OP)
    it's surely irrelevant whether the downstairs flooring is solid. The pipework could still have been cut into the walls.

    It is, as others have said, an installation done on the cheap.

    If you are thinking about taking the property ask the LL to confirm in writing that all loose pipework will be properly affixed to the wall before you move in.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 26th Jan 11, 1:40 AM
    • 45,571 Posts
    • 54,809 Thanks
    G_M
    • #7
    • 26th Jan 11, 1:40 AM
    • #7
    • 26th Jan 11, 1:40 AM
    If the visible pipework is running up the walls and through the ceiling to the floor above (as described by the OP)
    it's surely irrelevant whether the downstairs flooring is solid. The pipework could still have been cut into the walls.

    It is, as others have said, an installation done on the cheap.

    If you are thinking about taking the property ask the LL to confirm in writing that all loose pipework will be properly affixed to the wall before you move in.
    Originally posted by tbs624
    tbs - as I said, this is standard practice on Warmfront installations. Nothing wrong with it - just a bit unsightly.

    Apart from the loose plastic fixings which need to be re-done. 10 minutes with a rawl plug and screw driver.
    • riverboat2001
    • By riverboat2001 26th Jan 11, 1:44 AM
    • 472 Posts
    • 141 Thanks
    riverboat2001
    • #8
    • 26th Jan 11, 1:44 AM
    • #8
    • 26th Jan 11, 1:44 AM
    I have a slightly different point of view on this.
    (and thats all it is)


    I wonder if the person who put it in was worried about the pipes bursting behind walls.
    I don't know if this can actually happen, but you never know.

    I'm having a new shower and am selecting a wall mounted electric one to make it easier and hopefully cheaper to replace when it breaks.
    Was a 40 a day smoker for 20 years.
    Decided to give up, and haven't had a fag for 12 years.
    Halfway through losing six stone.

    Looking forward to early retirement.
  • tbs624
    • #9
    • 26th Jan 11, 5:01 AM
    • #9
    • 26th Jan 11, 5:01 AM
    tbs - as I said, this is standard practice on Warmfront installations. Nothing wrong with it - just a bit unsightly.
    Originally posted by G_M
    Of course cheap doesn't necessarily mean that there *is* anything wrong with it other than the aesthetics. My post didn't indicate otherwise.

    Pretty much lines up with your own comment that its down to costs - "Warmfron installations never run the pipes under the floor nor within casing - that costs extra."

    Apart from the loose plastic fixings which need to be re-done. 10 minutes with a rawl plug and screw driver.
    Originally posted by G_M
    possibly a drill too but, either way, that is the job of the LL, not the T
  • poppysarah
    I know the council were obliged to cover them up where they could be reached by a child in a friend's house. She had to get them to do them on the stairs too (bizarre piping job there)


    It's not a huge job to cover it up with some special covers
    http://www.bes.co.uk/products/137.asp
    Last edited by poppysarah; 26-01-2011 at 8:32 AM.
    • Soot2006
    • By Soot2006 26th Jan 11, 8:36 AM
    • 1,285 Posts
    • 1,316 Thanks
    Soot2006
    ""Its just a very cheap installation - landlord job.""

    or a house with solid flooring downstairs...... landlord houses and property owner houses....
    Originally posted by clutton
    ^this

    We bought our first house in 2009 - external pipes. Immediately called a CH company as the whole system was ancient anyway and it was explained to be the concrete floors made everything a lot harder and that almost everyone in the neighbourhood has a few pipes running up the wall in discrete corners.

    It did annoy me at first, but now they're glossed and white you honestly don't really see them.
  • Bryony84
    I know the council were obliged to cover them up where they could be reached by a child in a friend's house. She had to get them to do them on the stairs too (bizarre piping job there)

    It's not a huge job to cover it up with some special covers
    http://www.bes.co.uk/products/137.asp
    Originally posted by poppysarah
    Thanks for the replies everyone. Would it be unreasonable to ask the landlord to fit something like this to the pipes as a condition of us taking the place? The house is in the perfect location and apart from a few small things, it suits our needs very well but all the exposed copper pipes have put me off a bit.
    • Richard Webster
    • By Richard Webster 26th Jan 11, 9:44 AM
    • 7,463 Posts
    • 7,193 Thanks
    Richard Webster
    It does seem an awful lot of fuss about nothing. Pipes hidden in walls could leak and cause damage without anyone knowing.

    I suppose there could be some concern about children getting scalded, but it does seem that the main concern is a purely cosmetic one - what things look like. Is it that important?
    RICHARD WEBSTER

    As a retired conveyancing solicitor I believe the information given in the post to be useful assuming any properties concerned are in England/Wales but I accept no liability for it.
  • looktothefuture
    I have this type of installation in our home and tbh, it's never bothered me - Yes the older properties have this type of installation, especially if it was a previous council property. it was a very simple boxing in job to make it look right!
  • eanick
    Sorry but am I missing something? Surely the pipes in question will be no hotter than the radiators they are feeding, which is, by its nature, supposed to be hot?
  • looktothefuture
    My pipes get warm but not scorching! In fact they are actually not as warm as the rads - also they are in the corner of the walls so no one brushes up agains them or can get burned on them apart from the cat who sleeps in his basket underneath the pipes in the front room.
  • Scho
    My gf has a house with the pipes all on show downstairs but the previous owner had just popped some coving around them to hide the pipes and stop others from being burned etc on them. Be cheap enough and worth asking for before you move in.
    If you like the place say that you'd be happy to move in if he can ensure all the pipes are secured to the wall properly and covered in coving for safety. I've had my new LL replace a bath seal as a condition of me moving in as it was awful so sure they'd be happy to accomodate if it was a nice place and a decent landlord.
    • tyllwyd
    • By tyllwyd 26th Jan 11, 10:30 AM
    • 5,383 Posts
    • 4,370 Thanks
    tyllwyd
    When we had a new kitchen extension done a few years ago, the plumber decided in his wisdom to run pipes down the wall on top of the plasterboard instead of behind it - which was fine until we tried to fit a run of units along the wall and they couldn't go around the corner because of the pipes in the way. We got him to move them, but it was a pain - it hadn't even occurred to us that he would do it that way in a new build.

    Exposed pipes are pretty common, its probably just that the ones in the house you are looking at are more noticeable because they have never been painted.

    In a different house, we had exposed pipes which were near a doorway and easy for a child to touch by accident, so we got a carpenter to box them in.

    Whether you could persaude a landlord to cover the expense, unless the pipes are in an exposed place, somehow I doubt.
    • mkaibear
    • By mkaibear 26th Jan 11, 11:38 AM
    • 162 Posts
    • 103 Thanks
    mkaibear
    Just had a look round a potential rental property and the one thing that stood out to me as odd was that all the central heating pipes were exposed, running from the radiators up the walls to the next radiator upstairs. They were partially secured to the walls with plastic fixings but some were loose.

    Its not something I've ever see before so I was wondering how safe it is. These pipes get pretty hot and you could easily burn yourself on them (or other people/visiting children etc could).

    Just wondered if there are any regulations with such things?
    Originally posted by Bryony84
    All my downstairs heating has this (Cwmbran, house from 1969) due to solid floors.

    I have a grand total of once caught myself on the pipe (talking to the missus up the stairs and leant backwards onto it). She laughed at me.

    As someone else said, they don't get hotter than the radiators themselves, you can insulate them if you want - we have painted them with the same paint we used for the rooms and we don't notice them any more.
  • Suzy M
    Another reason for pipes not being cut in is that the walls themselved may be solid. Cutting in to stud walls is no problem but cutting in to brick is a right b****.
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