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  • FIRST POST
    • roddydogs
    • By roddydogs 11th Dec 10, 6:06 AM
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    roddydogs
    Window Locks-whats the point.
    • #1
    • 11th Dec 10, 6:06 AM
    Window Locks-whats the point. 11th Dec 10 at 6:06 AM
    Insurance companies make a big deal out of "Have you got window Locks", but you cant open a window from outside even if its unlocked, if a burglar can open your windows, hes already inside anyway?
Page 1
    • missile
    • By missile 11th Dec 10, 6:28 AM
    • 10,012 Posts
    • 5,083 Thanks
    missile
    • #2
    • 11th Dec 10, 6:28 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Dec 10, 6:28 AM
    It is an added security feature. Thief could break the glass or force the catch.

    Locks do seem pointless in my case. It would have to be one very brave / deperate cat burglar to climb to the sixth floor!
    "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Gandhi
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  • Dave101t
    • #3
    • 11th Dec 10, 6:37 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Dec 10, 6:37 AM
    so whats the point of a front door lock? they can kick down the door the same way they can break in a window....
    Target Savings by end 2009: 20,000
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    • dacouch
    • By dacouch 11th Dec 10, 6:52 AM
    • 20,687 Posts
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    dacouch
    • #4
    • 11th Dec 10, 6:52 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Dec 10, 6:52 AM
    Insurers like window locks because they reduce the chances of someone breaking in as they cannot just break the glass and open the window, in addition they have the major benefit of meaning that if someone does break in they cannot then open the biggest window (As it is locked) and climb out with their swag. This generally limited them to taking smaller items and / or a small bag of items.

    Obviously this hinges on you have dead locks on the doors eg doors that cannot be opened from the inside without the key.

    It is worth noting that in many cases the discount you get for having the correct door and window locks is tiny eg on a building and contents premium of say 250 it will often save only 3 or 4 a year. But for having this discount you are normally agreeing to use the locks whenever you go out and in some cases even when you are in the house and have gone to bed for you to have theft cover. In most cases I recommend my clients not to take the discount.
  • clemmatis
    • #5
    • 11th Dec 10, 8:42 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Dec 10, 8:42 AM
    My insurers won't cover for contents etc. -- have a clause saying they won't pay out -- unless acceptable locks (BS) are fitted on all windows accessible from ground level and acceptable locks (specified) are fitted to both front and back doors.
    Luckily all that stuff was here before I moved in. But having to keep the small top ground floor windows (top of bay window) locked, is ridiculous. I can though see these insurers arguing they are "accessible"... .
    (I can't change insurers. The house is subsiding. I could get a contents-only policy from elsewhere but they're expensive.)
    Last edited by clemmatis; 11-12-2010 at 8:43 AM. Reason: addition
    • Equaliser123
    • By Equaliser123 11th Dec 10, 9:06 AM
    • 3,319 Posts
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    Equaliser123
    • #6
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:06 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:06 AM
    Makes me chuckle how insurers ask you to confirm that your locks conform to BS blah blah blah. I've no idea really. I assume they do as they are fairly new.
    • roddydogs
    • By roddydogs 11th Dec 10, 9:56 AM
    • 6,187 Posts
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    roddydogs
    • #7
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:56 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Dec 10, 9:56 AM
    So if ive ticked the box confirming window locks, they are assuming their locked at all times?, and if their not they wont pay out?
    • marleyboy
    • By marleyboy 11th Dec 10, 7:16 PM
    • 14,803 Posts
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    marleyboy
    • #8
    • 11th Dec 10, 7:16 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Dec 10, 7:16 PM
    Insurance companies make a big deal out of "Have you got window Locks", but you cant open a window from outside even if its unlocked, if a burglar can open your windows, hes already inside anyway?
    Originally posted by roddydogs
    Not so, a window can easily be pried open with a screw driver if it is not locked, all it takes is the equivalent of a metal rod, pushed within the frame its able to reach the window arm, then its a simple case of popping the arm off its rest and your window is open. In some cases a quick bump of the frame is enough to dislodge a window arm and "unhinge" it from its rest.

    Insurance companies can refuse to pay out if no window locks are fitted, due to the ease of opening a window that is in effect, unlocked.

    To the insurance company, its the equivalent of leaving your car keys in the ignition and hoping that by closing the car door, nobody will notice.
    1+1+1=1
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    • Rolandtheroadie
    • By Rolandtheroadie 11th Dec 10, 8:27 PM
    • 4,841 Posts
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    Rolandtheroadie
    • #9
    • 11th Dec 10, 8:27 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Dec 10, 8:27 PM
    So if ive ticked the box confirming window locks, they are assuming their locked at all times?, and if their not they wont pay out?
    Originally posted by roddydogs
    Surprise surprise, ask Cilla Black.
    http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/article-7348016-cilla-black-1631m-insurance-blow.do
    • dacouch
    • By dacouch 11th Dec 10, 9:30 PM
    • 20,687 Posts
    • 12,817 Thanks
    dacouch
    Makes me chuckle how insurers ask you to confirm that your locks conform to BS blah blah blah. I've no idea really. I assume they do as they are fairly new.
    Originally posted by Equaliser123
    It's easy to see if your door lock conforms to the British Standard, if it does then it will have the kite mark and the relevant BS number on the plate where the mortice comes out.
    • dacouch
    • By dacouch 11th Dec 10, 9:34 PM
    • 20,687 Posts
    • 12,817 Thanks
    dacouch
    So if ive ticked the box confirming window locks, they are assuming their locked at all times?, and if their not they wont pay out?
    Originally posted by roddydogs
    It depends on the Insurer, as a general rule most will insist on the locks being applied if you have taken a discount for them. (It does vary from company to company though).

    In some areas eg London etc Insurers will insist you have certain types of locks and window locks.

    You can normally see if it is a requirement of your policy by looking at your schedule for a note on you using locks or in the policy booklet.

    In theory if the locks are not a requirement of your policy and / or you have not taken a discount for them. Then if you forgot to lock your door and went out your claim could be paid depending on the exact circumstances
    • roddydogs
    • By roddydogs 12th Dec 10, 8:42 AM
    • 6,187 Posts
    • 2,631 Thanks
    roddydogs
    The point is the insurance asks if locks are fitted-it dosent stipulate they must be locked at all times.. So you cant open a window, say in summer, without invalidating your insurance.?
  • Premier
    ... but you cant open a window from outside even if its unlocked, ...
    Originally posted by roddydogs
    Oh yes they can
    "Now to trolling as a concept. .... Personally, I've always found it a little sad that people choose to spend such a large proportion of their lives in this way but they do, and we have to deal with it." - MSE Forum Manager 6th July 2010
  • Premier
    The point is the insurance asks if locks are fitted-it dosent stipulate they must be locked at all times.. So you cant open a window, say in summer, without invalidating your insurance.?
    Originally posted by roddydogs
    That's right, but then most opportunity theives (the ones who usually gain entry through an open wiondow) probably won't enter if they see you are in the room.

    A general requirement of most forms of household insurance is that you take reasonable care to ensure the property is left secured.
    e.g. mine says they won't pay out unless there has been a forced entry; one where damage has occured.
    Last edited by Premier; 12-12-2010 at 11:19 AM.
    "Now to trolling as a concept. .... Personally, I've always found it a little sad that people choose to spend such a large proportion of their lives in this way but they do, and we have to deal with it." - MSE Forum Manager 6th July 2010
    • paulsad
    • By paulsad 12th Dec 10, 11:18 AM
    • 1,222 Posts
    • 1,806 Thanks
    paulsad
    Front of my house is on a busy road and overlooked - the back isn't it backs onto a quiet car park so I've deadlocked my conservatory doors as well as windows - makes us feel a little safer - but you really can't beat a huge rottweiller IMO
    • LittleMissAspie
    • By LittleMissAspie 12th Dec 10, 11:20 AM
    • 2,091 Posts
    • 3,144 Thanks
    LittleMissAspie
    We don't lock our windows with the keys, ever. I'm sure our insurance only asked if we have windows locks, not whether we use them. You have to push the lock button down to allow the arm to move, is that secure enough? I can't see how someone could do that from outside. We also leave the upstairs windows open but with the arm down so you can't move the window, you can also lock them in this position.
    • cajef
    • By cajef 12th Dec 10, 2:52 PM
    • 4,944 Posts
    • 4,010 Thanks
    cajef
    We don't lock our windows with the keys, ever.

    You have to push the lock button down to allow the arm to move, is that secure enough? I can't see how someone could do that from outside.
    Originally posted by LittleMissAspie
    Not locked, if you ever did have a break in that could effect the settlement, one of the first things the insurance will ask is if they were locked.

    Someone from outside smashes a hole on the glass puts their arm though presses the button and the window opens, all from outside, simple really.
    I used to have a handle on life, but it broke.
    • Jojo the Tightfisted
    • By Jojo the Tightfisted 13th Dec 10, 12:49 AM
    • 25,610 Posts
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    Jojo the Tightfisted
    My fire safety visit in my old flat ended with them stressing that I should leave all the windows unlocked at all times, as they could be needed to escape from a fire when I would be in no position to be looking for little keys.
    I could dream to wide extremes, I could do or die: I could yawn and be withdrawn and watch the world go by.

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    Originally posted by colinw
    • roddydogs
    • By roddydogs 13th Dec 10, 6:00 AM
    • 6,187 Posts
    • 2,631 Thanks
    roddydogs
    That's right, but then most opportunity theives (the ones who usually gain entry through an open wiondow) probably won't enter if they see you are in the room.

    A general requirement of most forms of household insurance is that you take reasonable care to ensure the property is left secured.
    e.g. mine says they won't pay out unless there has been a forced entry; one where damage has occured.
    Originally posted by Premier
    So if someone picks the lock, or has skeleton keys to enter, your not insured?
  • Oopsadaisy
    Urban Myth or not???

    Bloke is robbed. Entry point: Burglars kick the FRONT door off its hinges. Exit point: same FRONT door [to be exact: the gap where door once was].

    Insurance sends assessor round, assessor looks at BACK door and says 'this is a 3-lever lock and your policy says 5-lever is a must, so we are invalidating your policy'.

    So despite the fact that thieves never went into the kitchen or near the back door, the insurance company avoids paying out.

    True or false.
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