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    • mehefin
    • By mehefin 6th Oct 06, 8:54 AM
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    mehefin
    Pheasant recipes/suggestions?
    • #1
    • 6th Oct 06, 8:54 AM
    Pheasant recipes/suggestions? 6th Oct 06 at 8:54 AM
    A neighbour has given us a couple of pheasant - plucked etc and deep frozen.
    They are not very large so will probably cook the pair - just wondered if anyone had any reasonable OS recipes or suggestion how to cook. Thought we might adapt a duck recipe or just plain roast them?
    Know very little about game - is it fatty like duck?
    Might wait till we fire up the Rayburn and pot roast them. Any suggestions gratefully received.
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  • Sallys Savings
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 06, 9:02 AM
    • #2
    • 6th Oct 06, 9:02 AM
    I've only roasted mine...but they are nice, rather a strong flavour.
    If you haven't eaten pheasant before make sure you dont eat any of the yellow fat its really bitter.

    mmmm havent had a pheasant for a couple of years now.
    • thriftmonster
    • By thriftmonster 6th Oct 06, 9:04 AM
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    thriftmonster
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 06, 9:04 AM
    • #3
    • 6th Oct 06, 9:04 AM
    They're quite lean. If you aren't sure how old they are pot roast them in a large casserole with onion, celery and some wine - this is ds1's favourite food - oh if you can stir some redcurrant jelly in at the end
  • **purplemoon**
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 06, 9:08 AM
    Roast Goose
    • #4
    • 6th Oct 06, 9:08 AM
    On a similar vein does anyone know anything about roasting a goose please? My OH has requested we have goose for christmas dinner this year (neither of us are fond of turkey) but I've never cooked one before

    Would I be able to buy one from a local butcher or do I need to find a specialist game butcher? I don't mind buying online if I have to as long as it's good quality/free range etc so any recommendations would be good
  • rhubarbs
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 06, 9:17 AM
    • #5
    • 6th Oct 06, 9:17 AM
    I love goose. We have it every Christmas. I get mine from my local butcher, I place an order for it though as he doesn't buy many in. M&S do them too. Pretty much all geese are free range and good quality as they can't be mass farmed like turkey. They are quite fatty to cook (but not to eat!) and can make a bit of a mess of your oven. Sometimes the bird comes with pillows of fat just inside the cavity, take these out and render them down, the fat makes the best roast potatoes. Last year I followed Sophie Grigson's roasting instructions on the bbc website. Unlike most she covers the bird with foil, oven was a bit less messy... Enjoy.
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 6th Oct 06, 11:07 AM
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    thriftlady
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 06, 11:07 AM
    • #6
    • 6th Oct 06, 11:07 AM
    We have goose for Christmas too. It is my ds1's favourite food One thing you should bear in mind is that there is not as much meat on them as on a turkey, even though they look big. The cavity is quite roomy. There'll be enough for about 6 people I should think from an average sized bird, but you won't get loads of leftovers for the following weeks

    I order mine from my local Q Guild butcher and he gets them from here
    http://www.goodmansgeese.co.uk/ which very near me. They are pricy mind you, but when I bought a turkey I used to get a free range bronze turkey and they don't come cheap. Geese will not allow themselves to be reared intensively (sensible birds) so any goose you buy will be free range.

    They are also traditionally eaten at Michaelmas (29th Sept) as they were fattened up by letting them feed on the gleanings in the fields after the grain harvest.
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 6th Oct 06, 11:14 AM
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    thriftlady
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 06, 11:14 AM
    • #7
    • 6th Oct 06, 11:14 AM
    To get back to pheasants. I've just checked out Sophie Grigson's book Feasts For a Fiver, and she suggests taking the breasts off and frying them for a few minutes as they are very quick to cook. She serves them up with a sauce/gravy made of reduced pheasant stock (made from the carcases of the birds) and some kind of sweet preserve like elderberry jelly. She then uses the rest of the stock and the leg meat to make a curried pheasant chowder. Two meals from two birds.

    I once picked up a bag of pheasant legs from a farmer's market and made lots of rich stock from them. It was excellent in lentil soups
    • MrsTinks
    • By MrsTinks 6th Oct 06, 11:17 AM
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    MrsTinks
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 06, 11:17 AM
    • #8
    • 6th Oct 06, 11:17 AM
    We are having goose for christmas too as it's quite traditional in Denmark and I'm not a huge turkey fan (last year we had ducks and ham - meant we had leftovers for the next day for snacking on).

    I follow Hugh Fernley-Whittingstall's meat book for cooking times. (And I usually use roasting bags but that will need to change for the goose... drat!)
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    • MrsTinks
    • By MrsTinks 6th Oct 06, 12:23 PM
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    MrsTinks
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 06, 12:23 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Oct 06, 12:23 PM
    Pheasant is also pretty nice just roasted but wrapped in bacon... or try smearing apricot marmelade on the bird yum yum yum
    DFW Nerd #025
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    • Mrs pbradley936
    • By Mrs pbradley936 6th Oct 06, 1:09 PM
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    Mrs pbradley936
    I know a little bit about cooking game. First examine it to see if it is damaged, by that I mean is it peppered with shot? did the dog bringing it in bite down too hard? If it is undamaged you can more or less do what you what with it – bear in mind it will be dry compared with chicken. If it is damaged then I have very nice recipe. Cook it in a pressure cooker with a carrot and onion for about twenty minutes. Pull the meat off the bones and keep warm. Make a blond roux with the water from the pressure cooker and pure over the meat. Then dice and fry half a pound of streaky bacon with about a pint of breadcrumbs (not the store bought dust) pot the bacon and breadcrumb mix over the meat as if it was a crumble then bake in a hot oven.
    • liz545
    • By liz545 26th Nov 06, 6:56 PM
    • 1,713 Posts
    • 16,706 Thanks
    liz545
    Help, Pheasant!
    OH and I went falconing today at Leeds castle. It was brilliant fun, but one of the hawks caught a wild pheasant It's now hanging above my bathtub; as far as I can see our options are either to roast or braise it. I don't know how old it was, so I'm inclined to braise/potroast, but OH thinks roast. The catch is, neither of us have ever gutted a bird (or, in fact, anything) before, does anyone know how we should go about doing this?
    I'm not sure I want it to taste strongly gamey, so if I only hang it for a day or so, will it still be tender enough?
    • tanith
    • By tanith 26th Nov 06, 7:09 PM
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    tanith
    Try looking here http://hgic.clemson.edu/factsheets/HGIC3515.htm

    Lots of info
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    • Plasticman
    • By Plasticman 26th Nov 06, 7:30 PM
    • 2,259 Posts
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    Plasticman
    Some info here too: http://www.anglersnet.co.uk/forums/lofiversion/index.php/t56916.html

    I love pheasant - enjoy!
    If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around [the banks] will deprive the people of all property until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered." -Thomas Jefferson 1802
    • liz545
    • By liz545 27th Nov 06, 9:37 PM
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    liz545
    Well, that was about the single grossest thing I have ever done, ever! When we cleaned it up we found some grapes in the crop - the hawk caught it in the vineyard, strange to see 'the deceased's' last meal! Gutting it was awful, I don't want to ever do that again! Even after the plucking, it's still kind of stubbly, so will it need skinning before we braise it? I'm planning to do something like coq au vin, with wine, shallots and lardons.
    • DonnaP
    • By DonnaP 6th Feb 07, 8:32 AM
    • 457 Posts
    • 731 Thanks
    DonnaP
    Pheasant legs
    In my butchers today he is selling pheasant legs for 35p each. I have never eaten pheasant and would like to try it.

    I thought about doing it as a casserole in the slow cooker - is that the best way to cook pheasant?:confused:

    Thanks

    Donna
    • thriftlady
    • By thriftlady 6th Feb 07, 8:47 AM
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    thriftlady
    Hi Donna,
    I've not cooked pheasant that often, but I have cooked pheasant legs. I made soup with them - a sort of curried chowder thing if I remember correctly. I think i made stock with them, then picked off the meat. I fried some onions in curry spices, added veg and some of the stock and the meat. I froze the rest of the stock and used it to make lentil soup, it was delicious.

    I think casseroling or soup is best because they will probably be from quite old birds this late in the season. I'm sure someone with more knowledge of game will come along and give you more advice.
    • Busybody
    • By Busybody 6th Feb 07, 8:48 AM
    • 906 Posts
    • 462 Thanks
    Busybody
    Pheasant is very nice not had the legs though! just breast, cooked it quickly in nearly dry fry pan.
    • mouseymousey99
    • By mouseymousey99 6th Feb 07, 9:05 AM
    • 1,829 Posts
    • 2,870 Thanks
    mouseymousey99
    If you have half a bottle of red wine hanging about (I wish) makes really good sauce with pheasant. (but you would need to thicken with some butter and flour)...
    • angelavdavis
    • By angelavdavis 6th Feb 07, 9:08 AM
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    angelavdavis
    I would definitely cook in slow cooker. Remove meat from bones and then add shallots, bay leaf, mixed herbs, red wine, carrots, celery. Possibly slightly brown meat off first with shallots and celery in frying pan, add wine to deglaze then tip into a warmed slow cooker and add remaining ingredients.
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    • morganlefay
    • By morganlefay 6th Feb 07, 9:30 AM
    • 1,214 Posts
    • 1,754 Thanks
    morganlefay
    We had pheasant legs on Saturday as a casserole. They were delicious. This is what I did:
    Chop and gently fry an onion, a carrot and I added a bit of manky celery - leaves and all. Fry till soft but not brown, then add some flour (about 1 tbsp)and mix in till all flour absorbed by the fat/oil you used for the veg. cook a minute or two then add some meaty stock (Oxo cube), a biggish glug of red wine if you have it, and a couple of tablespoons tomato puree. Stir it all gently till it thickens - add more water if it gets too thick. Add any herbs you have or fancy - I had some fresh thyme and a bayleaf. Brown the legs quickly in another pan with a bit of oil then hurl them into the veggie gloop and cook. I did in oven for about an hour, but you could do them in sc too. Serve wiht mash and a green veggie. Fabulous ! (Wish I could get them for 35p) Be careful because old birdies sometimes have biggish sinews running all down legs (which is why I cook them whole) and you will need to avoid these when eating, but if you've cooked long and slow the meat will be all tender and yummy and you can just eat round the sinews.
    Enjoy !
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