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  • FIRST POST
    • bizzylizzy
    • By bizzylizzy 2nd Oct 06, 9:25 PM
    • 643Posts
    • 750Thanks
    bizzylizzy
    30 degree wash
    • #1
    • 2nd Oct 06, 9:25 PM
    30 degree wash 2nd Oct 06 at 9:25 PM
    I am trying to find ways of cutting the gas and electricity we are using (got a car load of FREE logs today!!)

    At the moment I am using one washing tablet (Asda's own bio) and half a cup of washing soda in each wash at 40 degrees with good results. Has anyone tried this at 30 degrees?

    Also the only 30 degree programme on my machine has a slow spin, so I would then need to put each wash through a fast spin too. Do you think that would cancel out the savings I could make on a 30 degree wash?

    Any thoughts?

    Last edited by Former MSE Natasha; 07-11-2006 at 4:21 PM.
Page 1
  • ScoobieGirl
    • #2
    • 2nd Oct 06, 9:37 PM
    • #2
    • 2nd Oct 06, 9:37 PM
    Can you not run your machine on rinse hold then run the faster spin?

    I've never run anything on 30 except items I REALLy didn't want to fade. I never thought it was good for washing after our chemistry teacher taught us that a lot of reactions are at the very least linear, and often exponentialy related to temp, so I didn't think they would be that good at 30. But having seen the adverts recently for energy saving I think I will try it for lightly soiled washes.
    Last edited by ScoobieGirl; 02-10-2006 at 9:41 PM.

    • tru
    • By tru 2nd Oct 06, 9:40 PM
    • 8,720 Posts
    • 45,920 Thanks
    tru
    • #3
    • 2nd Oct 06, 9:40 PM
    • #3
    • 2nd Oct 06, 9:40 PM
    I use about a third of the amount (at the very most - it's usually less) of washing powder, with no washing soda at 20 or 30 degrees, no problem.

    How slow is the slow spin? I use 400 or 800 spin, that way there's hardly any ironing to do
    Bulletproof
  • Beamish
    • #4
    • 2nd Oct 06, 9:50 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Oct 06, 9:50 PM
    I am trying to find ways of cutting the gas and electricity we are using (got a car load of FREE logs today!!)

    At the moment I am using one washing tablet (Asda's own bio) and half a cup of washing soda in each wash at 40 degrees with good results. Has anyone tried this at 30 degrees?

    Also the only 30 degree programme on my machine has a slow spin, so I would then need to put each wash through a fast spin too. Do you think that would cancel out the savings I could make on a 30 degree wash?

    Any thoughts?
    by bizzylizzy
    Funny enough I saw a T.V advert last night for a soap poweder that washes clean on 30 degrees wash, I made the comment that I did not think 30 deg would be hot enough to get out the dirt and stains, like you I wash on 40 deg for a daily wash and if I have something stained I spray some vanish on first, this works for me, also if its whites only I add some soda crystals.

    I think that you would cancel out any savings if you had to respin the wash.

    Is there any other way you could make savings i.e. turn thermostats down a tadge, leave airing cupboard door open ajar to heat upstairs, if you have a cold kitchen to get up to in the morning put some water into the slow cooker/or porridge and leave it on slow overnight, this makes the kitchen lovley and warm when you get up, put a curtain over the front door if its draughty, check to see if your Electricity Board do a cheap overnight rate, ours does, so I set the washing machine, breadmaker and slow cooker to all come on at 1 a.m., my DH would have us all up and showering at 3 a.m. if he could:rolleyes: I also turn the central heating off overnight and time it to come back on at 7 a.m. but meanwhile put the immersion on to heat up the hot water on cheap overnight rate electricity, you could always ask a Customer Home Service Rep to come and have a chat with you about making savings.

    Hope this helps

    Beem
    • bizzylizzy
    • By bizzylizzy 2nd Oct 06, 10:18 PM
    • 643 Posts
    • 750 Thanks
    bizzylizzy
    • #5
    • 2nd Oct 06, 10:18 PM
    • #5
    • 2nd Oct 06, 10:18 PM
    I use about a third of the amount (at the very most - it's usually less) of washing powder, with no washing soda at 20 or 30 degrees, no problem.

    How slow is the slow spin? I use 400 or 800 spin, that way there's hardly any ironing to do
    by troo

    I'm not sure how slow the spin is (normal is 1000) but I don't want it too wet as it will take even longer to dry in the winter, I drape it round the house if it is raining.
    • bizzylizzy
    • By bizzylizzy 2nd Oct 06, 10:32 PM
    • 643 Posts
    • 750 Thanks
    bizzylizzy
    • #6
    • 2nd Oct 06, 10:32 PM
    • #6
    • 2nd Oct 06, 10:32 PM
    Funny enough I saw a T.V advert last night for a soap poweder that washes clean on 30 degrees wash, I made the comment that I did not think 30 deg would be hot enough to get out the dirt and stains, like you I wash on 40 deg for a daily wash and if I have something stained I spray some vanish on first, this works for me, also if its whites only I add some soda crystals.

    I think that you would cancel out any savings if you had to respin the wash.

    Is there any other way you could make savings i.e. turn thermostats down a tadge, leave airing cupboard door open ajar to heat upstairs, if you have a cold kitchen to get up to in the morning put some water into the slow cooker/or porridge and leave it on slow overnight, this makes the kitchen lovley and warm when you get up, put a curtain over the front door if its draughty, check to see if your Electricity Board do a cheap overnight rate, ours does, so I set the washing machine, breadmaker and slow cooker to all come on at 1 a.m., my DH would have us all up and showering at 3 a.m. if he could:rolleyes: I also turn the central heating off overnight and time it to come back on at 7 a.m. but meanwhile put the immersion on to heat up the hot water on cheap overnight rate electricity, you could always ask a Customer Home Service Rep to come and have a chat with you about making savings.

    Hope this helps

    Beem
    by Beamish
    Thank you for all those ideas, I will look into overnight electricity - I have just switched my supplier today so will wait to find out what they offer. I will put a curtain over the front door asap too. I have a slow cooker and tried porridge in it overnight once but it was HORRIBLE! Casseroles and rice puddings have come out well though. We have an open fire and we're collecting as much wood as we can to use when the weather turns cold. Nice and cosy too!
  • Volcano
    • #7
    • 3rd Oct 06, 1:31 AM
    • #7
    • 3rd Oct 06, 1:31 AM
    Considering the nutters on here that think 'eco-balls' work (i.e. they are getting good results with water only and NO detergent) then 30 degrees with washing powder is ample for the bulk of your washing.
  • archived user
    • #8
    • 3rd Oct 06, 8:19 AM
    • #8
    • 3rd Oct 06, 8:19 AM
    I wash at least half of my washing with no heat at all. Saying that, my family doesnt get their clothes really grubby. I also use washing powder, which works out more economical than tablets. I put the powder in the drum before the clothes which stops it clogging up in the drawer.
  • wigginsmum
    • #9
    • 3rd Oct 06, 8:24 AM
    • #9
    • 3rd Oct 06, 8:24 AM
    I do most of my washing on 30 degrees and it's fine, even mucky allotment clothes. Whites I occasionally do at 90 degrees if they're very grubby and grey. I just use bog-standard bio washing powder.
    The ability of skinny old ladies to carry huge loads is phenomenal. An ant can carry one hundred times its own weight, but there is no known limit to the lifting power of the average tiny eighty-year-old Spanish peasant grandmother.
  • jellycat40
    I wash everything on my quickwash 30mins 30 degrees but fast spin. I only use a tiny bit of washing powder each time. The free sample you get in the post for one wash does me for 4-5 washes. I don't use conditioner very often either only on my sheets.

    My washing is clean enough, some stuff the stains won't come out no matter what you do. Sunshine is good for getting tomato and turmeric stains out. If the washing doesn't do it hang them in the sunshine they will be gone in a couple of hours.

    Louise
    Nobody is perfect - not even me.
    • Penny Watcher
    • By Penny Watcher 3rd Oct 06, 9:01 AM
    • 3,412 Posts
    • 5,824 Thanks
    Penny Watcher
    Bio Washing Powder & 30 deg wash
    I always understood (meaning I'm probably wrong ) that the enzymes that eat the stains/muck on your clothes work at body temperature. They are afterall "digesting" the proteins, fats etc in the stains.

    Therefore a 40 deg wash should be the optimum temp for the BIO part of your washing powder, 30 deg being to cold to activate it.

    Mind you it's full of all sorts of other chemicals too that I suppose will work at various temperatures.

    You cannot live as I have lived an not end up like me.

    Oi you lot - please GIVE BLOOD - you never know when you and yours might need it back! 52 pints so far.
  • wigginsmum
    You're probably right, Penny - I simply look at whether the stains come out
    The ability of skinny old ladies to carry huge loads is phenomenal. An ant can carry one hundred times its own weight, but there is no known limit to the lifting power of the average tiny eighty-year-old Spanish peasant grandmother.
    • juliejim
    • By juliejim 3rd Oct 06, 9:25 AM
    • 7,575 Posts
    • 151,595 Thanks
    juliejim
    I do most of my washing at 30 deg without any problems.
    NST #10 Steps 7K 2/30 10K 2/12 5 a day 3/30 NSD 0/20
    MBNA 5500
    • kittie
    • By kittie 3rd Oct 06, 9:28 AM
    • 12,446 Posts
    • 78,966 Thanks
    kittie
    when I was small my mum had to heat a boiler in order to get the washing done for nine of us. She used to soak a lot of the washing overnight in a bath full of cold water. There were no bio powders either and we were all very neatly and cleanly turned out. I should imagine that a lot of her washing was done at 30 or less, once the cold, wet clothes had been added to some hot water. I do remember helping her as i was the oldest and a girl and my hands used to be freezing in and out of the cold water

    I should think that modern materials are responsible for holding onto stains as cottons were always cleanable with a lot of elbow grease. I personally have started to wash all my clothes at 30 but I use a stain remover on anything containing artificial fibres or on tough stains eg tomato sauce on white cotton t shirts

    I am an ecover/soda user but they have limited use at 30. I now have to mentally balance energy saving v pollutants and so far darks are good at 30 with the ecover mix. Also white cotton sheets. Undies and t shirts are best with a bio at 30
  • Volcano
    New enzyme technology means that they've been developed to work at low temperatures in line with modern delicate fabrics that require lower temperatures themselves. In fact, higher temperatures have a detrimental effect on the enzyme, meaning they don't work as well.
  • HouseHunter
    I would just like to pass something on that a washing machine engineer once told me. I used to have a machine with a REALLY fast spin and I was forever having to get the engineer out to fix it. He said it's the fast spin that damages the machine and to never spin above 1000rpm if you want your machine to last. anyway, the machine finally died and I had to get a new one. The one I chose had a fastest spin of 1000 rpm and sure enough after nearly five years I've never had a problem with it (not bad for 190 from Argos). I also think my clothes last longer as well, and MUCH less ironing required . It seems well worth a bit of hassle having clothes draped around the house during wet weather.
    • mrsmortenharket
    • By mrsmortenharket 3rd Oct 06, 10:38 AM
    • 2,097 Posts
    • 20,893 Thanks
    mrsmortenharket
    Oh dear! I must confess.

    Whites are washed on 95 deg

    darks on 60 deg

    towels & sheets on 95 deg.

    Opps.

    I save leccy in other ways, with those long life bizarre shaped light bulbs that meant I needed new lampshades.

    Also leave nothing on standby.

    Only have the hot water on for 2-3 hours a day max.

    *awaits lecture*

    Lisa x
    • jobbingmusician
    • By jobbingmusician 3rd Oct 06, 11:12 AM
    • 19,316 Posts
    • 19,870 Thanks
    jobbingmusician
    I have a slow cooker and tried porridge in it overnight once but it was HORRIBLE!
    by bizzylizzy
    Quickest and most energy efficient way to make porridge is 2-3 minutes in microwave!
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    • MATH
    • By MATH 3rd Oct 06, 12:05 PM
    • 2,931 Posts
    • 5,603 Thanks
    MATH
    I sort and wash

    Blacks and Navys - Cool (about 30 c)

    Bright colours - Warm (hand hot - about 40 c)

    Pastals - Warm/hot (feels a bit warmer than hand hot -about 50 c)

    Whites/ heavy soil pastals - Hot (my hot water cylinder is set at 60 c)

    IME the warmer the water the better the wash
    Life's a beach! Take your shoes off and feel the sand between your toes.
    • Jet
    • By Jet 3rd Oct 06, 12:09 PM
    • 1,520 Posts
    • 974 Thanks
    Jet
    I always find if I wash darks on 40 degrees I get white powder residue on the clothes.

    Why is that? I intend to go back to washing liquid, but it's not as cheap as powder. :confused:
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