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  • FIRST POST
    • MSE Archna
    • By MSE Archna 18th Aug 06, 9:37 AM
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    MSE Archna
    Should I get a price capped or green energy tariff? Article Discussion Area
    • #1
    • 18th Aug 06, 9:37 AM
    Should I get a price capped or green energy tariff? Article Discussion Area 18th Aug 06 at 9:37 AM

    This thread is specifically to discuss the content of the

    Should I get a price capped or green energy tariff? Article

    To discuss or ask a question about this article: click reply
    Report inappropriate posts: forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com




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  • The StuSter
    • #2
    • 21st Aug 06, 2:43 PM
    • #2
    • 21st Aug 06, 2:43 PM
    Further to the article and the latest round of increases I am considering a price capped tariff. Any thoughts or pointers from existing users or prospective users of these plans?

    Who are the main players? The usual suspects? Can the utilities ever really lose - or to put it another way, can the customer ever win?

    TIA
    I'll get my coat. Taxi!
    • gt94sss2
    • By gt94sss2 8th Sep 06, 5:01 PM
    • 4,304 Posts
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    gt94sss2
    • #3
    • 8th Sep 06, 5:01 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Sep 06, 5:01 PM
    For information - I've just come across Ecotricity who supply Green Elecricity and promise never to charge more than your regional electricty company.

    I only mention them here as its one I had not previously come across.

    Regards
    Sunil
    • gt94sss2
    • By gt94sss2 8th Sep 06, 5:10 PM
    • 4,304 Posts
    • 2,035 Thanks
    gt94sss2
    • #4
    • 8th Sep 06, 5:10 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Sep 06, 5:10 PM
    Further to the article and the latest round of increases I am considering a price capped tariff. Any thoughts or pointers from existing users or prospective users of these plans?

    Who are the main players? The usual suspects? Can the utilities ever really lose - or to put it another way, can the customer ever win?
    by The StuSter
    Its possible for customers to win - it all depends on the timing though.

    As I had a feeling prices would be going up, in 2004 I signed up to Scottish Power's then online capped tariff and am still on it (until the end of this year).

    I think it came to about 1/1.50 extra a month in standing charges at the time but has meant that we have avoided all the huge price rises since then (am not looking forward to when it finishes!) - hence a huge 'win' for me.

    However, now that prices have gone up 50/100%(?), the question is it worth signing up to such a package now? In my view probably not (as I hope the next price changes are downwards.

    However, if you do and you are happy paying whatever premium they charge for having your prices fixed, make sure the tariff you agree to has the following (as my Scottish Power one did):

    1. If 'normal' prices call below the cap, yours should too (i.e. they should not be fixed)

    2. There should not be any penalty if you want to change provider or tariff during your capped period (I notice now that capped tariffs are more popular, one or two providers have tried this)

    Regards
    Sunil
    • penrhyn
    • By penrhyn 8th Sep 06, 5:21 PM
    • 15,006 Posts
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    penrhyn
    • #5
    • 8th Sep 06, 5:21 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Sep 06, 5:21 PM
    With wholesale gas prices falling, one "expert" on 5 live this afternoon recommended that it would be unwaise to go on a capped deal for more than 12 months.

    Sorry I cannot recall which organisation he came from.
    That gum you like is coming back in style.
  • gimpymoo
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 06, 9:29 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 06, 9:29 PM
    For information - I've just come across Ecotricity who supply Green Elecricity and promise never to charge more than your regional electricty company.

    I only mention them here as its one I had not previously come across.

    Regards
    Sunil
    by gt94sss2
    Thanks for the heads up.

    Am in the process of moving house and they appear to be an ethical company.
    • Discogod
    • By Discogod 15th Sep 06, 11:17 AM
    • 316 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    Discogod
    • #7
    • 15th Sep 06, 11:17 AM
    • #7
    • 15th Sep 06, 11:17 AM
    Thanks for the heads up.

    Am in the process of moving house and they appear to be an ethical company.
    by gimpymoo
    I too found these guys, but have decided not to go for them. Whilst on the surface they look good, underneath i don't think they are.

    They have two directors, each earning over 200k per year. This isn't what i call very green. Also, they are known to fight local government planning refusals with expensive lawyers - pricing the council out of the fight as it becomes too expensive.

    Please consider this & research it some more before switching.
    • Bubbalou
    • By Bubbalou 16th Sep 06, 2:01 PM
    • 51 Posts
    • 43 Thanks
    Bubbalou
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 06, 2:01 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Sep 06, 2:01 PM
    I too found these guys, but have decided not to go for them. Whilst on the surface they look good, underneath i don't think they are.

    They have two directors, each earning over 200k per year. This isn't what i call very green. Also, they are known to fight local government planning refusals with expensive lawyers - pricing the council out of the fight as it becomes too expensive.

    Please consider this & research it some more before switching.
    by Discogod
    Hi

    I don't really think earning over 200k a year technically means you are not green. No, it's pretty capitalist to pay yourself that amount of money, and I'm not a capitalist, but capitalists and green thinking are not mutually exclusive.

    What are the council refusing planning on exactly? I am all for it if they are building wind farms. I don't mean to attack you, I would be interested in where you got your information from however.

    • Discogod
    • By Discogod 17th Sep 06, 1:42 PM
    • 316 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    Discogod
    • #9
    • 17th Sep 06, 1:42 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Sep 06, 1:42 PM
    Hi

    I don't really think earning over 200k a year technically means you are not green. No, it's pretty capitalist to pay yourself that amount of money, and I'm not a capitalist, but capitalists and green thinking are not mutually exclusive.

    What are the council refusing planning on exactly? I am all for it if they are building wind farms. I don't mean to attack you, I would be interested in where you got your information from however.

    by Bubbalou
    agreed on your earnings thinkings. I just don't liek the vision that this company market themselves as green (and they are more green than many many others). If i was the director, i'd be more concerned with changing hte environment (for the better) than paying myself over the odds. I'm sure he'd get by just as well on 50k per year & that's alot more reasonable. Of course the other 150k per person can then be spent on green things.....

    anyway, this post prompted me to do more digging: http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showpost.html?p=2745374&postcount=6

    some more info on here:
    http://www.savethevale.org.uk/ecotricity.html

    i also got some info from here (though it's opening hours are 0700-midnight Mon-Sat)
    http://wck2.companieshouse.gov.uk/

    hope this helps someone. oh, sure no worries about your concerns at all, i'm just trying to make sure anybody who is interested is fully aware. From there of coures it's entirely their choice.
    • cmacneil
    • By cmacneil 15th Oct 06, 1:36 PM
    • 61 Posts
    • 278 Thanks
    cmacneil
    Thanks for the heads up.

    Am in the process of moving house and they appear to be an ethical company.
    by gimpymoo

    I'm very interested in going green and did not know about this company (so thanks for the tip!) However, I am concerned that while they advertise that they will match what I am currently paying, their online quoting mechanism actually gives me a rate that is about 10% *higher* than what I pay now.

    Any similar experiences?

    Chris
    • Discogod
    • By Discogod 15th Oct 06, 2:38 PM
    • 316 Posts
    • 121 Thanks
    Discogod
    I'm very interested in going green and did not know about this company (so thanks for the tip!) However, I am concerned that while they advertise that they will match what I am currently paying, their online quoting mechanism actually gives me a rate that is about 10% *higher* than what I pay now.

    Any similar experiences?

    Chris
    by cmacneil
    yeah, i asked them to quote me & they basically said what is on their website for my area (east midlands). this is despite the fact i pay less than this as i'm currently with ebico.
    • cynic
    • By cynic 19th Oct 06, 4:39 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    cynic
    ecotricity facts
    Ecotricty are actually recommended by FOE approved website:
    http://www.greenelectricity.org/tariffs.php

    They told me last week that their current percentage of renewable energy is currently 27% (it was previously 17.4% from Apr 04 - Apr 05). While this isn't as high as the 100% chaps that's not the point of signing up with these guys. It is also quite a bit higher than many green tarriffs and importantly is growing.

    Having said that I know nothing about their customer service and agree that cos they only match standard regional rates there is some juice left on table

    I think using Tesco style aggressive lawyers to force building of wind turbines actually sounds like a good idea. Climate change has moved on beyond any place where any of us can be NIMBYs anymore, sorry!

    I similarly have no probs with someone earning 200k a year if they have set up their own innovative multimillion pound company. One cannot disinvent capitalism plus we sadly need the capitalists to get in on this big green idea
  • roger56
    yeah, i asked them to quote me & they basically said what is on their website for my area (east midlands). this is despite the fact i pay less than this as i'm currently with ebico.
    by Discogod
    For info, Ebico are at
    http://www.ebico.co.uk/

    If anyone is interested in being green, take a look at Ebico "equiclimate" here:
    http://www.ebico.co.uk/equiclimate/equiclimate.htm

    The idea is simple, basically they remove the EU CO2 trading allowances from circulation on your behalf:
    http://www.ebico.co.uk/equiclimate/immediateaction.htm
  • Flurry
    Price increases on green tariffs
    Powergen has just confirmed to me that the price increases for green tariffs were just as high as for non-green ones. That sounds to me like having your cake and eating it as far as the companies are concerned, as they charge more for the green tariffs in the first place but pass on the full cost of increases in non-green costs. Bah humbug!
  • boopybetty
    Just a word of warning about switching to green energy tariffs. I switched my gas & elec to British Gas Green Click Enery tariff in Sept 06 (was originally on standard tariff), l am paying 40 a month for the gas, 25 for elec. I have just received notification that my monthly gas DD will be raised to 91 based on my monthly usage. I told them this was not acceptable and that if there was a debit when my bill was due, then l would pay it in total with my debit card there and then, as l had always done on the standard tariff, l was told this apparently can't be done with the green tariff, and that my only option is to go back to standard tariff or change supplier. Anyone else come across this?
  • kenlaing
    Should I go Green ?
    I'm considering Green Energy schemes, but will the supplier actualy buy more Green Energy, or am I just helping them to meet existing commitments to buy a proportion of renewable energy ?
    • magyar
    • By magyar 8th Feb 07, 1:38 AM
    • 18,389 Posts
    • 30,446 Thanks
    magyar
    I'm considering Green Energy schemes, but will the supplier actualy buy more Green Energy, or am I just helping them to meet existing commitments to buy a proportion of renewable energy ?
    by kenlaing
    It depends on the company. Here's a very quick (well, I'll try to be quick!) explanation of how it works:

    Some electricity companies generate it themselves (like Powergen, Scottish Power or npower), and some will just buy it (like British Gas).

    Every company who sells you energy has to source a certain amount of it from renewables sources e.g. wind, solar, small hydro-electric. Currently, that amount is about 7%, but it will rise as time goes on.

    If they generate that 7% themselves, then great. If not, they have to 'buy' this amount from others. For example a small wind farm will not have any suppliers, so it can sell its share to a not-so-green company.

    So since your electricity company has either generated, or bought, its share of green energy it can justifiably sell it on to you.

    So if you really want to look at how ethical your green energy is, look at this: are more than 7% of their customers on a green tariff? If the answer is YES then this company is buying or generating MORE green energy than it is required to by law. If the answer is NO, then this might just mean they haven't marketed the product well enough, but equally you might think of looking elsewhere.
    Says James, in my opinion, there's nothing in this world
    Beats a '52 Vincent and a red headed girl
    • denimmaterial
    • By denimmaterial 22nd Feb 07, 7:09 AM
    • 26 Posts
    • 40 Thanks
    denimmaterial
    We've been with Staywarm (Powergen) for six or seven years now, each year the price has gone up. The last hike was to £108 pm. as we were 'high users'. It looks as though they no longer base their rates on the no. of bedrooms and occupants as Martin pointed out in a previous newsletter. We are switching to British Gas before the next annual contract starts at the beginning of March and making considerable savings based on our previous year's usage.
  • energylinx
    If you wanted to see exactly how green or otherwise any particular supplier is have a look at www.fuelmix.co.uk.

    This site shows what is known as the fuel mix of every single supplier operating in the UK.

    Do not use the site to transfer but instead use one of Martin's recommended sites.
  • energyman
    If you wanted to see exactly how green or otherwise any particular supplier is have a look at www.fuelmix.co.uk.

    This site shows what is known as the fuel mix of every single supplier operating in the UK.

    Do not use the site to transfer but instead use one of Martin's recommended sites.
    Originally posted by energylinx

    The above site is useful but let's be clear here - unless you have your own energy source, the electricity you get through your meter will result in the same amount of greenhouse gas and other emissions as everyone else. Your supplier is the one you pay the money to - the electricity that comes through the wires is no different if you have a green tariff. What you are doing if you opt for a green tariff is providing money to the supplier which you hope will lead to more renewable energy being produced. For example:

    Ecotricity - claim to spend more money per customer on building new renewable sources than any other supplier. However, for every 1 you give to them, a proportion ulitmately goes to paying running costs of existing schemes, admin charges, charges for top up power (not produced by their own generation) and profit. Ecoctricity investment is however relatively small compared to that being put into some of the offshore windfarms.

    Good Energy - claim to be the greenest supplier as all the electricity they supply comes from renewable sources. Well this is true in the fact that they buy from renewable generators the same amount of energy that they sell but this only supports existing generators and does not directly lead to new supplies. However, they do offer good rates to generators which may encourage more investment in new generation.

    British Gas - they claim to have the lowest emissions of the main electricity suppliers (excludes ecotricity and good energy). However, this is just where they happen to buy their energy from and does not reflect their investment in new renewbale sources or a positive action on their part to buy more renewable energy.

    Other suppliers such as scottish power and southern electrcity will put some of the money you give to them into a fund to support projects - however the projects tend to have a general 'environmental' theme and not purely renewable energy investment.

    Overall if you want to help reduce greenhouse emissions, the most effective way would be to find the cheapest supplier and spend the money saved on reducing your own energy consumption (more insulation, energy saving lightbulbs etc.)! If you really want to have a green tariff then on balance I would go for ecotricity.
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