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  • FIRST POST
    • calleyw
    • By calleyw 16th Jan 10, 6:04 PM
    • 9,230Posts
    • 17,205Thanks
    calleyw
    How long does double glazing last?
    • #1
    • 16th Jan 10, 6:04 PM
    How long does double glazing last? 16th Jan 10 at 6:04 PM
    The reason for this question is that my DG is really rubbish. All the handles are loose or breaking off.

    And now my bathroom window is locked shut. Can't open it. Even took off a good handle and fitted and still no go.

    I have no idea how long ago it was fitted. I suspect it was approx 1995. Have I just got cheap nasty windows or is it something else.

    Thanks in advance.

    Yours

    Calley
Page 1
    • jfdi
    • By jfdi 16th Jan 10, 6:27 PM
    • 1,014 Posts
    • 1,508 Thanks
    jfdi
    • #2
    • 16th Jan 10, 6:27 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Jan 10, 6:27 PM
    Ours got a bit dodgy too, as the years passed (current lot was installed about 1991).

    We got a local DG chap to 'service' it for us - replacing broken handles, fixing hinges, replace popped panes etc. Good as new now!
    • SailorSam
    • By SailorSam 16th Jan 10, 6:57 PM
    • 21,172 Posts
    • 36,772 Thanks
    SailorSam
    • #3
    • 16th Jan 10, 6:57 PM
    • #3
    • 16th Jan 10, 6:57 PM
    I suppose buying DG is the same as everything else, some companies are more expensive but then do you get what you pay for.
    And how can the layman tell what he's getting ?
    Liverpool is one of the wonders of Britain,
    What it may grow to in time, I know not what.

    Daniel Defoe: 1725.
  • pdswindowsltd
    • #4
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:05 PM
    Keep them Maintained for maximum usage
    • #4
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:05 PM
    you should normally aim to get 15 to 20 years with pvc, we always reccomend our customers to give the pvc a wipe down with some soapy water every few months, lightly oil or spray hinges and moving parts yearly (doors/opening windows). from time to time you may need to replace the odd handle/hinge from usage and the odd double glazed unit. local companies can service for usually not a lot of money.
    • themanbearpig
    • By themanbearpig 16th Jan 10, 7:07 PM
    • 464 Posts
    • 863 Thanks
    themanbearpig
    • #5
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:07 PM
    • #5
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:07 PM
    Hardwood frames will last a lifetime if maintained properly, and just cost slightly more than plastic. Its a shame everyone has bought into the UPVC scam.
  • pdswindowsltd
    • #6
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:18 PM
    • #6
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:18 PM
    I suppose buying DG is the same as everything else, some companies are more expensive but then do you get what you pay for.
    And how can the layman tell what he's getting ?
    Originally posted by SailorSam
    unfortunately buying double glazing is not all the same a lot of companies use poorer materials to maximise profits, you should always research what products they are using and compare quotes and products with other companies
    If you go local you usually get a family run business who dont talk nonsence and dont come out with all the fancy brochures or laptops and bore you to death, you just want a company to come round measure up and give you a price no fancy talking!
  • Avoriaz
    • #7
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:25 PM
    • #7
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:25 PM
    Hardwood frames will last a lifetime if maintained properly, and just cost slightly more than plastic. Its a shame everyone has bought into the UPVC scam.
    Originally posted by themanbearpig
    What scam? :confused:

    We had Anglian Windows fully double glaze our house nearly 25 years ago.

    We haven't had a single problem. None of the sealed units have yet failed and every opening window still opens easily without any sticking. It all still looks in excellent almost new condition.

    All we do is clean the glass when needed and occasionally clean the white PVC and the channels and hinges etc in the openers.

    Buy quality double glazing, look after it and it should last for many decades.
    • SailorSam
    • By SailorSam 16th Jan 10, 7:37 PM
    • 21,172 Posts
    • 36,772 Thanks
    SailorSam
    • #8
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:37 PM
    • #8
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:37 PM
    unfortunately buying double glazing is not all the same a lot of companies use poorer materials to maximise profits, you should always research what products they are using and compare quotes and products with other companies
    If you go local you usually get a family run business who dont talk nonsence and dont come out with all the fancy brochures or laptops and bore you to death, you just want a company to come round measure up and give you a price no fancy talking!
    Originally posted by pdswindowsltd
    I spent a couple of years selling for Everest, even though i'm not there now i still believe they are one of the best. Having said that when i got my own house done i went to a smaller local firm. I can see that these aren't quite as good but they were less than half the price.
    It's a bit like, i drive a Ford and i really wanted a Porche.
    Liverpool is one of the wonders of Britain,
    What it may grow to in time, I know not what.

    Daniel Defoe: 1725.
  • Suzkin
    • #9
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:47 PM
    • #9
    • 16th Jan 10, 7:47 PM
    Hardwood frames will last a lifetime if maintained properly, and just cost slightly more than plastic. Its a shame everyone has bought into the UPVC scam.
    Originally posted by themanbearpig
    Hi,

    I still have hardwood frames. Inside the frames are perfectly fine; outside, they are rotting (i.e. the varnish has gone and the wood has 'ridges').

    What is the best way to go about repairing them? :rolleyes: I don't want to pay for double glazing: can't afford it!

    Thanks.
  • ormus
    i have a Leanto but i really wanted a Porch.
    Get some gorm.
    • Secret Lady
    • By Secret Lady 16th Jan 10, 7:53 PM
    • 721 Posts
    • 315 Thanks
    Secret Lady
    : rotfl:
    i have a Leanto but i really wanted a Porch.
    Originally posted by ormus
    : rotfl:
    Grant me the serenity to accept the people I cannot change, the courage to change the one I can and the wisdom to know it's me"
  • 996ducati
    Hardwood frames will last a lifetime if maintained properly, and just cost slightly more than plastic. Its a shame everyone has bought into the UPVC scam.
    Originally posted by themanbearpig
    The downside to hardwood is of course the maintenance and more so they tend to have a higher rate of failure on double glazed sealed units.
    • 27col
    • By 27col 16th Jan 10, 8:11 PM
    • 6,446 Posts
    • 4,215 Thanks
    27col
    Like when a bob a job lad asked a chap for a job. The man said "You can paint the porch". Later on the lad came back and said "I couldn't find a Porsche, so I painted the Aston Martin".
    I can afford anything that I want.
    Just so long as I don't want much.
  • rachbc
    even the 'good' ones aren't going to last the 100+ years my wood windows have thats for sure
  • Suzkin
    Hi,

    I still have hardwood frames. Inside the frames are perfectly fine; outside, they are rotting (i.e. the varnish has gone and the wood has 'ridges').

    What is the best way to go about repairing them? :rolleyes: I don't want to pay for double glazing: can't afford it!

    Thanks.
    Originally posted by Suzkin
    Hi,

    Can anyone advise, please?
    Thanks.
  • knowloads
    Window Doctor (other companies out there), Franchise but most guys are ex fitters.
    will normally help. PVC does not last forever like the adverts said it would. Screw holes get brittle, pvc gets dull.
  • PennyPinchingMiser
    Hi,

    I still have hardwood frames. Inside the frames are perfectly fine; outside, they are rotting (i.e. the varnish has gone and the wood has 'ridges').

    What is the best way to go about repairing them? :rolleyes: I don't want to pay for double glazing: can't afford it!

    Thanks.
    Originally posted by Suzkin
    Cut out any rotten bits, then fill with wood filler, then varnish/paint

    Then keep up with the maintenance
    My advice is worth exactly what you're paying for it!

    "Never, in the field of banking bailouts, has so much been owed by so few, to so many."
    Anon.
    • TomsMom
    • By TomsMom 16th Jan 10, 10:24 PM
    • 4,729 Posts
    • 13,050 Thanks
    TomsMom
    My mom's house was double glazed with UPV windows/doors over 30 years ago. She's getting on now but has always cleaned down the outside fairly regularly and they still look like new. In all that time she has only had one DG unit fail, one window is misting up between the panes on very cold days but she's not bothering to get it replaced (at 86 and ill she doesn't see the point), it doesn't affect the window's performance. She used a local firm.
  • pdswindowsltd
    even the 'good' ones aren't going to last the 100+ years my wood windows have thats for sure
    Originally posted by rachbc

    Them windows must have been really well maintained, in this day and age people are too busy to sand down and restain all the windows in there house just the same as fascias and soffits, pvc are a lot more maintainance free and more energy efficient!
  • David Norris
    The problem with wooden windows is the maintenance required, my neighbours had new wooden ones installed and it took them over a month (on weekends) to stain them all and worse still the finish is not the best, and they still havnt painted the insides yet!
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