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    • scotsbob
    • By scotsbob 15th Dec 09, 7:54 PM
    • 4,462 Posts
    • 6,958 Thanks
    scotsbob
    • #2
    • 15th Dec 09, 7:54 PM
    • #2
    • 15th Dec 09, 7:54 PM
    Well if it's ok to take seats they haven't paid for I guess they may as well steal some sweets and some programmes.
    Maybe steal a few handbags and phones when the lights are down and no one is looking.
    If they leave a few minutes before the end they might be able to steal a car from the car park as well.

    Theft is theft no matter how you dress it up.

    (Bargainous? What does that mean?)
    • elsien
    • By elsien 15th Dec 09, 7:57 PM
    • 17,556 Posts
    • 44,383 Thanks
    elsien
    • #3
    • 15th Dec 09, 7:57 PM
    • #3
    • 15th Dec 09, 7:57 PM
    I'd leave it till after the first interval and if no-one had shown up then I'd move to them. I don't agree that it's theft if they're clearly not going to be taken at any point. I've seen it happen before in theatres and no-ones objected.
    Would be different if they'd been sold and people turned up to use them, but if it's a no-show I really don't see that it's a problem.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Flickering Ember
    • By Flickering Ember 15th Dec 09, 9:51 PM
    • 11,623 Posts
    • 128,854 Thanks
    Flickering Ember
    • #4
    • 15th Dec 09, 9:51 PM
    • #4
    • 15th Dec 09, 9:51 PM
    I'd ask a steward first; I worked as a steward and it was always the policy that the person whose seat it was is entitled to show up at any time they wish so we had to keep it free in case they arrived late. Other stewards have been lenient and let people sit there on the condition that they move immediately if/when the rightful occupants of the seats turn up which I think is fine. I remember moving from 2nd to 1st row at a show where the said seats were vacated by press photographers who weren't coming back.
    Flickering Embers grow higher and higher...I need a break and I wanna be a paperback writer!
    • geri1965
    • By geri1965 15th Dec 09, 10:31 PM
    • 8,366 Posts
    • 14,004 Thanks
    geri1965
    • #5
    • 15th Dec 09, 10:31 PM
    • #5
    • 15th Dec 09, 10:31 PM
    Theft is theft no matter how you dress it up.
    Originally posted by scotsbob
    You need to look up the legal definition of theft, I think.
    • scotsbob
    • By scotsbob 16th Dec 09, 12:02 AM
    • 4,462 Posts
    • 6,958 Thanks
    scotsbob
    • #6
    • 16th Dec 09, 12:02 AM
    • #6
    • 16th Dec 09, 12:02 AM
    You need to look up the legal definition of theft, I think.
    Originally posted by geri1965
    Maybe you should.

    http://www.nelsonthornes.com/aqagce/A2%20Sample%20material/business/AQA%20law.pdf

    Try buying a standard ticket on a train and then occupy a first class seat and see how the law treats you. Doing the same in a theatre is no different.
    • cptncanary
    • By cptncanary 16th Dec 09, 12:57 AM
    • 190 Posts
    • 150 Thanks
    cptncanary
    • #7
    • 16th Dec 09, 12:57 AM
    • #7
    • 16th Dec 09, 12:57 AM
    Maybe you should.

    http://www.nelsonthornes.com/aqagce/A2%20Sample%20material/business/AQA%20law.pdf

    Try buying a standard ticket on a train and then occupy a first class seat and see how the law treats you. Doing the same in a theatre is no different.
    Originally posted by scotsbob
    Legally yes, it's theft, but morally...(there are no morals in law :rolleyes: )
    C'mon you Canaries!!
    • RuthnJasper
    • By RuthnJasper 16th Dec 09, 1:00 AM
    • 3,615 Posts
    • 8,638 Thanks
    RuthnJasper
    • #8
    • 16th Dec 09, 1:00 AM
    • #8
    • 16th Dec 09, 1:00 AM
    I am an actress and long-time theatre-goer. The answer is: Yes - it is perfectly acceptable to do this. The correct way to do this is to either ask an usher/usherette once the lights go down, but before the curtain rises, OR wait until the first "big" song commences and then move discreetly down. You will be asked to return to your seats if your move is inappropriate (highly unlikely, unless ticket holders for your "upgraded" (!) seats arrive late), or ignored by the staff. You MIGHT get a few 'tut's from your potential new seat-neighbours, but scr*w them - you don't know them, and anyway they should be watching the show and NOT judging you!

    Also - for the actors, it is actually BETTER if people do this. Theatre stage lights generally block out the audience by degrees, the further back they are. Therefore, you are actually doing the actors a favour by ensuring that all the rows nearest to the stage are filled. Plus, once a performance has started, latecomers are not always admitted to the auditorium. If you were there in time to see the curtain rise, and others weren't, take those seats and enjoy the show!

    Ta-daaa!

    Merry Christmas.

    Ruth & Jasper
    xx
    • sarahlouise210
    • By sarahlouise210 16th Dec 09, 1:17 AM
    • 3,163 Posts
    • 3,614 Thanks
    sarahlouise210
    • #9
    • 16th Dec 09, 1:17 AM
    • #9
    • 16th Dec 09, 1:17 AM
    I have done this on numerous occasions and see nothing wrong with it - if the seat is going to be empty throughout the performance then why not ?? It would be totally different if someone else had bought the ticket, but usually by about 20 mins in to the show you have a good indication that the seat will remain empty and is fair game! I even check out the internet at my local theatre and see which seats are empty before the performance so I know where I can move to! When I saw Jersey Boys recently we did not need to move but loads of people around us moved to better seats - no-one batted an eyelid..the seats were empty anyway. Why would anyone sit through a show with a poor view if they could move to an empty seat with a better view - just does not make sense! Agree totally with Ruth & Jasper...it is awful when the audience is sparce and spread out !
    I have had brain surgery - sorry if I am a little confused sometimes
    • elisebutt65
    • By elisebutt65 16th Dec 09, 1:19 AM
    • 3,793 Posts
    • 7,289 Thanks
    elisebutt65

    (Bargainous? What does that mean?)
    Originally posted by scotsbob
    Bargainous: to be considered an exceptional bargain; ridiculously cheap.
    From Urban Dictionary

    Noli nothis permittere te terere
    Bad Mothers Club Member No.665
    Student MoneySaving Club member 026! Teacher now and still Moneysaving

  • Stampede
    Yes I'd move ..in my experience it is a widely accepted practice and therefore I do not see anything morally or legally wrong. When I say accepted, I include the theatre management and as others say, the cast prefers to look out on a 'fuller, compact ' house, not odd faces dotted all around the seating area. I fully accept that if any person with a ticket for the seat turns up they have the right to it. I've seen it done at theatres and sports venues.

    totally debt free and still some money in the bank for a rainy day .. although I am
    fully aware that a lot of folks, through no fault of their own are not so fortunate ..a Happy Christmas and a better New Year to them especially.
    • Taffybiker
    • By Taffybiker 16th Dec 09, 7:04 AM
    • 917 Posts
    • 499 Thanks
    Taffybiker
    I'd move if it really was a better view, but every theatre I've been in has had large screens displaying what is happening on stage. In fact, the performers have been almost invisible to to the glare of overly bright lighting, and I found myself watching the screens anyway.
    Try saying "I have under-a-pound in my wallet" and listen to people react!
    • gRoberts
    • By gRoberts 16th Dec 09, 7:22 AM
    • 130 Posts
    • 42 Thanks
    gRoberts
    My personal rule is, if I'm not happy with the seats and there are better ones. Move. If someone comes along and claims it's their seats, I move. Simple.

    You may say the seats are "more" expensive but a seats a seat and your all there to watch the same show. Why charge more in the first place.
  • peterudd
    Stealing by finding???
    I guess this might be interpreted as 'stealing by finding', but for my money it's OK towards the the end of the first interval.
    Last edited by peterudd; 16-12-2009 at 6:30 PM.
    • warmhands.coldheart
    • By warmhands.coldheart 16th Dec 09, 8:34 AM
    • 3,491 Posts
    • 3,824 Thanks
    warmhands.coldheart
    Yes,

    I've done it before and wasn't a problem as they were empty.
    Obviously if they were sold and the people appear who actually booked them, then you'd have to give them up. but otherwise why not.... they are empty
    • DJ Mike
    • By DJ Mike 16th Dec 09, 8:36 AM
    • 235 Posts
    • 212 Thanks
    DJ Mike
    I attended a showing of Avenue Q recently, and for the whole of the first act, the row behind us was empty. We were sat right at the front so had to look upwards all the time (although tbh it wasn't that bad) - nonetheless sitting a row back would have meant we could crane our necks less.

    However, come the interval, the row filled up with people who claimed that because they arrived late, they had to stay at the very back until the interval, when they were allowed to go to their seats.

    Now, either they're big fat liars (I didn't put the question to them about why they were suddenly occupying those seats, but someone else did) - or it's a genuine policy of big theatres not to allow disruption to a show once it has started, but allow you to move during the interval.

    So the point of the matter is - during the whole of the first act, you basically have no way of knowing if those empty seats are simply unused, or if their patrons are left at the back of the theatre waiting until the interval.

    By the second act, if they didn't fill up, it'd probably go less noticed for you to nab them, but by the time you get to the second act, do you really care?
    • pineapple
    • By pineapple 16th Dec 09, 8:43 AM
    • 6,298 Posts
    • 30,236 Thanks
    pineapple
    I wouldn't have a problem with this. As people have said, it looks better for the performer anyway.
    But I would probably be worried the occupants might suddenly turn up - by which time someone else is in MY seat.
    • geri1965
    • By geri1965 16th Dec 09, 8:49 AM
    • 8,366 Posts
    • 14,004 Thanks
    geri1965
    Maybe you should.

    http://www.nelsonthornes.com/aqagce/A2%20Sample%20material/business/AQA%20law.pdf

    Try buying a standard ticket on a train and then occupy a first class seat and see how the law treats you. Doing the same in a theatre is no different.
    Originally posted by scotsbob
    Your link confirms the definition of theft as follows:

    "A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property
    belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the
    other of it; and ‘thief ’ and ‘steal’ shall be construed accordingly."

    If you sit in a seat you haven't paid for, you are not permanently depriving anyone of it - the seat is still there when you leave! You may be temporarily depriving someone of it's use if you don't move when asked.

    • John_Pierpoint
    • By John_Pierpoint 16th Dec 09, 9:15 AM
    • 8,233 Posts
    • 7,383 Thanks
    John_Pierpoint
    It does not work on trains and planes though, unless you can blag your way to an upgrade.

    Can cause an unpleasant taste on the mouth if you boast about it - especially on holidays ("we paid less for the holiday than you paid to get to the airport") For some people ignorance is bliss.

    I remember a singer saying "I'm not singing to empty seats, you lot come down here" - I suppose us "real" fans did get to sit behind the punters who had paid full price for the stalls.
    • gaily
    • By gaily 16th Dec 09, 9:19 AM
    • 188 Posts
    • 157 Thanks
    gaily
    Be prepared to move like Greased Lightning
    I've been to the theatre before, and arrived well before time - to find someone sat in my seat. They hastily moved, and it transpired through the course of the evening that their party was unable to purchase tickets together, but didn't want to miss the show and decided to see how long they could sit and chat before anybody turned up.

    After the first act, the people sat next to us left - presumably to join their friends. I had no problem with it at the time as there was no argument - it was my seat, and it was well before the performance started.

    If I was late to sit down, ie just before the curtain went up, and was feeling rushed harassed etc by running late, I would not be impressed if i then had to cause a bit of a commotion and move people out of my seat (especially if not on the aisle). If I was arriving to sit down at the first opportunity to do so, then hopefully they would have the good grace to move quietly.
    Always on the hunt for a bargain. :rolleyes:

    Always grateful for any hints, tips or guidance as to where the best deals are
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