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    • meanmarie
    • By meanmarie 24th Aug 09, 7:25 PM
    • 5,091 Posts
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    meanmarie
    • #2
    • 24th Aug 09, 7:25 PM
    • #2
    • 24th Aug 09, 7:25 PM
    Cheese merchants will tell you that the rind is as edible as the rest of the cheese, just takes longer to melt....shouldn't do you or dish any harm

    Marie
    Weight 08 February 86kg
  • jacky_horn
    • #3
    • 24th Aug 09, 7:47 PM
    • #3
    • 24th Aug 09, 7:47 PM
    Yes it is edible but sometimes a bit hard to chew so is best used for its flavour only. Try using it in cooking as a flavouring. If it hasn't melted by the end of cooking you can sling it. It will have done its job.
  • mgardner
    • #4
    • 24th Aug 09, 8:06 PM
    • #4
    • 24th Aug 09, 8:06 PM
    Hi Yes it is edible but I would not risk using it in a specific receipe. Try grating it and making a sauce and use it if you like the taste
    • Seakay
    • By Seakay 24th Aug 09, 8:37 PM
    • 4,172 Posts
    • 10,055 Thanks
    Seakay
    • #5
    • 24th Aug 09, 8:37 PM
    • #5
    • 24th Aug 09, 8:37 PM
    cheese rind is edible but some cheeses are coated in wax so do make sure before you use it to cook with!
    Some versions of some recipes (eg casoulet) actually suggest putting cheese rinds into the dish to add flavour and avoid waste - parmesan rinds are very hard to grate up but will melt into a slow cooked dish very well.
    • Patchwork Quilt
    • By Patchwork Quilt 24th Aug 09, 8:47 PM
    • 1,837 Posts
    • 11,056 Thanks
    Patchwork Quilt
    • #6
    • 24th Aug 09, 8:47 PM
    • #6
    • 24th Aug 09, 8:47 PM
    Nigella advocates putting the cheese rind in the freezer until you have time to use it in your soup, or whatever. I'm sure I did this once but the freezer is now so full of green beans that I haven't seen it for ages
  • clutterydrawer
    • #7
    • 25th Aug 09, 7:37 PM
    • #7
    • 25th Aug 09, 7:37 PM
    Interesting. I completely missed the post about checking if it was awxed and slung it all in my dinner this evening!

    I heated it in a cheese and broccoli cup a soup with garlic, sage, pepper and veg, and used it as a pasta sauce. It didn't melt as such but it was very nice.

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    *dies of wax poisoning*
    August grocery challenge: 50
    Spent so far: 37.40
  • Dr_DiNg_DoNg
    • #8
    • 25th Aug 09, 7:41 PM
    • #8
    • 25th Aug 09, 7:41 PM
    Italians use cheese rind in some soups.
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 27th Oct 10, 10:20 AM
    • 8,682 Posts
    • 30,532 Thanks
    Primrose
    • #9
    • 27th Oct 10, 10:20 AM
    Melting Parmesan cheese rinds in soups
    • #9
    • 27th Oct 10, 10:20 AM
    I've often read that melting finished Parmesan cheese rinds in soups improves their flavour and have collected a number of rinds in plastic bags in my fridge for this purpose. But the rinds do taste a little stale and manky and now the soup making season is here, wonder if anybody actually does this and whether it really does improve the flavour?
  • rachbc
    I put one in with minestrone soup but no others - I thinknit does add a savouriness and its not essential
  • Diflower
    I save them in the freezer and add them when making pasta sauces like Bolognese, and some soups - when I remember

    • hotcookie101
    • By hotcookie101 27th Oct 10, 10:38 AM
    • 2,038 Posts
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    hotcookie101
    I keep them in the freezer and add to soups, bolognase and stews. They do make a difference and I find it increases the savory-ness (am sure thats a real word!)

    I just have them in a bag in the door of the freezer and chuck one in. Just remember to remove it if you are blitzing the soup
    • Primrose
    • By Primrose 27th Oct 10, 10:45 AM
    • 8,682 Posts
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    Primrose
    hotcookie - does this mean that the rind doesn't actually completely melt and disappear?
  • noapron
    There was a series on a while ago called Economy Gastronomy where the cook put Parmesan rind in soup and raved about it. I didn't know you could save it in the freezer though, so thanks for that tip. I have taken to putting Parmesan into my meatball mix, so now I'm wondering grating the rind would work as well.
  • Diflower
    hotcookie - does this mean that the rind doesn't actually completely melt and disappear?
    Originally posted by Primrose
    No, it gets quite a bit smaller depending on cooking time though.
    So I'm not sure that you could use the actual rind for grating into things, it's very hard.

  • seraphina
    I do this and fish out what's left of the rind - it doesn't disappear entirely.

    It definitely imparts a great savouriness that's especially appreciated in soups made with vegetable stocks - in fact the first time I seasoned as I usually do and got it totally wrong because of the depth of flavour given by the rind.
    • Firebird
    • By Firebird 27th Oct 10, 1:11 PM
    • 251 Posts
    • 311 Thanks
    Firebird
    This sounds like a good idea. I never knew what to do with the rind other than bin it which goes against the grain. We love parmesan with just about everything so buy it on offer when I can and freeze it so I will keep the rind and add to something when we are finished.
    • rosie383
    • By rosie383 27th Oct 10, 1:17 PM
    • 4,756 Posts
    • 10,457 Thanks
    rosie383
    Thank you for the tip about putting it in the freezer. I was dead chuffed with the last one I bought as it didn't have any rind at all!
    Father Ted: Now concentrate this time, Dougal. These
    (he points to some plastic cows on the table) are very small; those (pointing at some cows out of the window) are far away...
    • Meadows
    • By Meadows 27th Oct 10, 1:27 PM
    • 4,074 Posts
    • 10,404 Thanks
    Meadows
    I've often read that melting finished Parmesan cheese rinds in soups improves their flavour and have collected a number of rinds in plastic bags in my fridge for this purpose. But the rinds do taste a little stale and manky and now the soup making season is here, wonder if anybody actually does this and whether it really does improve the flavour?
    Originally posted by Primrose

    They taste fine, cut off the very outer waxy edge before use or freezing (I try to only remove a thin slice from the outer edge as you don't want the wax in your cooking).
    Add the rind to cooking then discard piece/pieces you do use before serving, they don't tend to melt but go very soft.

    It just adds a light creamy slightly cheesy taste to your cooking.

    Just wrap them in a little cling film and then in a freezer bag and use straight from the freezer when needed.
    Everything has its beauty but not everyone sees it.
    • Caterina
    • By Caterina 27th Oct 10, 1:52 PM
    • 5,791 Posts
    • 40,200 Thanks
    Caterina
    Primrose, the rind does not melt completely, just a bit but what it does is it becomes soft and gives out flavour (and a bit of saltiness).

    Italians do this as a matter of course and when I first started living with my DH (then boyfriend) I had a memorable argument with him, because I served him soup with a piece of this cooked rind and he was really upset at biting into it, thinking it was a slug!We have come a long way since then!
    Finally I'm an OAP and can travel free (in London at least!).
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