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  • FIRST POST
    • ifti
    • By ifti 1st Aug 08, 1:20 PM
    • 339Posts
    • 40Thanks
    ifti
    Rising Damp
    • #1
    • 1st Aug 08, 1:20 PM
    Rising Damp 1st Aug 08 at 1:20 PM
    Hi,

    we seem to have small patches of damp it seems on a wall which isnt linked to anything, it open on the other side. its a semi detached house. the wall has been newly painted.

    the outside floor was raised but is still around 10-15cm lower then the damp proof corse only problem is that the damp proof wall/thing has green stuff on it.

    it does have air bricked down the bottom but we not sure if there blocked or not.

    can any suggest what the problem might be,

    i will add pics later on.

    thanks in advance.



























    Last edited by ifti; 01-08-2008 at 3:10 PM.
Page 1
    • ifti
    • By ifti 2nd Aug 08, 10:21 PM
    • 339 Posts
    • 40 Thanks
    ifti
    • #2
    • 2nd Aug 08, 10:21 PM
    • #2
    • 2nd Aug 08, 10:21 PM
    anyone have any ideas
    • ixwood
    • By ixwood 3rd Aug 08, 10:48 AM
    • 2,512 Posts
    • 1,987 Thanks
    ixwood
    • #3
    • 3rd Aug 08, 10:48 AM
    • #3
    • 3rd Aug 08, 10:48 AM
    It's got to be coming from somewhere. Any blocked/leaking gutters/downpipes anywhere? over flowing Water butt? Anything bridging the damp proof course? Walls etc?

    Going out and having a look when it's chucking it down might be helpful.

  • Suzy M
    • #4
    • 3rd Aug 08, 11:12 AM
    • #4
    • 3rd Aug 08, 11:12 AM
    Looks as though the exterior rendering has bridged the damp proof course. If so simplest solution is to remove the rendering to above the dpc.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 3rd Aug 08, 11:34 AM
    • 25,949 Posts
    • 70,166 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #5
    • 3rd Aug 08, 11:34 AM
    • #5
    • 3rd Aug 08, 11:34 AM
    I can't see properly because the pictures are so massive!

    Can you make the pictures a lot smaller or just link to where you've kept them?
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 03-08-2008 at 11:37 AM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • ifti
    • By ifti 3rd Aug 08, 12:17 PM
    • 339 Posts
    • 40 Thanks
    ifti
    • #6
    • 3rd Aug 08, 12:17 PM
    • #6
    • 3rd Aug 08, 12:17 PM
    ive cut the pictues down,

    i though the line tht you see is the dpc and below that is nothing

    theres no drainage stuff here so no blockage only problem is that rain water cant escape as theres no drainage along the side of the house. only another house around a metre away
    • Sunnyday
    • By Sunnyday 3rd Aug 08, 12:26 PM
    • 3,892 Posts
    • 34,008 Thanks
    Sunnyday
    • #7
    • 3rd Aug 08, 12:26 PM
    • #7
    • 3rd Aug 08, 12:26 PM
    Does rainwater run into the holes in the airbrick?
    SD
    Planning on starting the GC again soon
  • Suzy M
    • #8
    • 3rd Aug 08, 4:28 PM
    • #8
    • 3rd Aug 08, 4:28 PM
    i though the line tht you see is the dpc and below that is nothing
    Originally posted by ifti
    Air bricks are usually two or three brick courses below the dpc.
    • ifti
    • By ifti 3rd Aug 08, 4:28 PM
    • 339 Posts
    • 40 Thanks
    ifti
    • #9
    • 3rd Aug 08, 4:28 PM
    • #9
    • 3rd Aug 08, 4:28 PM
    not too sure about, it shouldnt do but we will check when it rain heavy.

    is the damp proofing the part which is slightly out on the outside pictures.

    a neighbour said the old owner raised the floor above the DPC but it doesnt seem like that when we look at it.

    he also said he may have raised the floor and then put the DPC on which is confusing

    thanka again for the info
  • Suzy M
    Forgot to add unless the air brick is for ventilation of a pantry or under the stairs.
    • ifti
    • By ifti 17th Aug 08, 10:11 PM
    • 339 Posts
    • 40 Thanks
    ifti
    here are a few more pictures, we have managed to clear up the bottom air blocks.

    as you can see from the pictures there are some airblocks at the top on each room too, this i think if for air circulation.

    can anyone tell me what else could be the problem could the wall be soaking in water.


    no water goes in through the air brickes but they were slightly blocked and we managed to clean them up

    thanks in advance













    • Steve_xx
    • By Steve_xx 17th Aug 08, 11:35 PM
    • 6,590 Posts
    • 2,767 Thanks
    Steve_xx
    I assume that the path to the front door has been raised? I assume this due to the fact that the airbrick is at ground level and therefore heavy rain will penetrate the holes in this airbrick and will end up in the house.

    The wall has been rendered and I note from the pics that the other airbricks are set back into the wall. Rain may be running into them and then running down the inside wall. I would suggest that the pointing around those airbricks needs to be angled at 45 degrees, like putty holding a piece of glass in a window frame. This will ensure that water is drained outside, as it looks to me like it's possible that rainwater could be ducted indside.

    The line which juts out at the bottom the wall may not be the damp proof course, it may just be the way the house is built. Do you know whether you have an injected damp course or is it a plastic or bitumen course? If it's an injected course you will/should be able to see where the holes to inject it have been drilled in the wall. If you cannot see these holes then it looks like you may have 'bridged' the damp proof course. The next question is where actually is the damp proof course. Is it at or slightly above the line in the bricks that you mentioned, or is it below the airbrick that is at ground level?

    Is the damp patch on the inside anywhere near the floor level airbrick on the outside?
    Last edited by Steve_xx; 17-08-2008 at 11:38 PM.
  • Suzy M
    You can't really solve the damp problem until you know where the dpc is so using the image that shows the street -

    Is the unrendered brick wall opposite yours a house wall?

    If so is the house identical / similar in age, design and/or materials as yours?

    If it is closely examine your neighours wall and you may be able to see where the original dpc should be. I can see there is no blue engineering brick course so look out for what looks like the edge of roofing felt between two layers of bricks. This should give you some indication of where your original dpc should be. - Or the brown rubber plug holes if it has a injected chemical dpc.

    If you can't see plugs or the "roofing felt" look even more closely and you may be able to see if there is a difference between the bricks used at or near ground level and a bit higher. If there is a difference the lower bricks may be engineering bricks (they'll be much harder and denser) and would have been used below ground up to the dpc level.

    If the wall opposite is not identical /similar to yours have a look around the neighbourhood for a house like yours that hasn't been rendered and see where the dpc is on that.
  • george1010
    Id agree that your DPC has been bridged. We have found in our experience that your dpc level in most cases would sit underneath your airbrick.

    The airbrick is there to allow airflow under your sub floor. Have you noticed any bounce to your floor area.

    Course of action

    Install new dpc to bottom of your wall. If possible install a french drain along your side of the wall. Your rendered section on the wall should have a bell mouth drip batton above your airbrick (just above your new dpc). Inside the house hack off defective wall to 1m in height and rerender with a 2 coat sika 1 fine sharp and cement 3:1 mix.

    You may even find that your wall has been rendered with bonding which is no good for external walls.

    more information on the above can be found at:

    www. atruss .co.uk/high_ground_levels

    ATRUSS PRESERVATION London damp proofing specialists
    • red40
    • By red40 21st Dec 09, 6:19 AM
    • 241 Posts
    • 294 Thanks
    red40
    Another problem you have along with the DPC being bridged is that the DPC level is only around 75mm above the path. The distance between any floor level and the DPC should be 150mm.

    • cyclonebri1
    • By cyclonebri1 21st Dec 09, 9:00 AM
    • 12,547 Posts
    • 5,178 Thanks
    cyclonebri1
    Looking at the wall opposite your house, by the brick bond it appears to be a non cavity wall property, ie, the wall will be 9" or double brick. Just as likely, even more likely, to be penetrating damp than rising damp. The thinning of the wall for the socket outlet won't have helped either.

    Try an exterior waterproofing solution as a 1st option, but rain water will definately be entering the wall via the air brick if there is no liner in the wall at that point. I would hack out the airbrick to ensure it's redone properly, ,
    I like the thanks button, but ,please, an I agree button.

    Will the grammar and spelling police respect I do make grammatical errors, and have carp spelling, no need to remind me.

    Always expect the unexpectedand then you won't be dissapointed
    • keystone
    • By keystone 21st Dec 09, 9:45 AM
    • 10,774 Posts
    • 5,874 Thanks
    keystone
    George, Red, Cyclone

    I should think that its been fixed by now. This thread is 16 months old!

    Cheers
    • cyclonebri1
    • By cyclonebri1 21st Dec 09, 4:46 PM
    • 12,547 Posts
    • 5,178 Thanks
    cyclonebri1
    George, Red, Cyclone

    I should think that its been fixed by now. This thread is 16 months old!

    Cheers
    Originally posted by keystone

    Don't you just hate it when threads get ressurected like this, even when you know2 you are right,
    I like the thanks button, but ,please, an I agree button.

    Will the grammar and spelling police respect I do make grammatical errors, and have carp spelling, no need to remind me.

    Always expect the unexpectedand then you won't be dissapointed
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