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    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 20th Oct 05, 7:37 AM
    • 3,286Posts
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    apprentice tycoon
    quick question ...when is the right time to bake a Christmas cake? (merged)
    • #1
    • 20th Oct 05, 7:37 AM
    quick question ...when is the right time to bake a Christmas cake? (merged) 20th Oct 05 at 7:37 AM
    I always make my Christmas cakes around now, half term-ish, but each Christmas I promise myself that I'll make it sooner to give it longer maturing time, but I never get around to it.
    Does anyone know for certain that a cake made in september is better than one made in october?
Page 1
    • Hermia
    • By Hermia 20th Oct 05, 11:18 AM
    • 4,275 Posts
    • 12,504 Thanks
    Hermia
    • #2
    • 20th Oct 05, 11:18 AM
    • #2
    • 20th Oct 05, 11:18 AM
    My mum has made them in September and October depending on how organised she is. She says that as long as you put some booze in it each month up to Xmas it'll be fine. I do warn you that you can get drunk just sniffing my mum's cake though!
  • rchddap1
    • #3
    • 20th Oct 05, 11:21 AM
    • #3
    • 20th Oct 05, 11:21 AM
    Did mine 2 weeks ago.

    Will never forget my first Xmas cake though....ability to get people drunk at 100 paces!

    These days I do a non-alchoholic version using cranberry juice as one of my OH's daughters has a thing against alcohol. Or that's how it started anyway. People still like it...and I don't have to spend the extra cash of booze just to stick in a Xmas cake...far better to put the cash towards some of the 'good stuff'.
    Baby Year 1: Oh dear...on the move

    Lily contracted Strep B Meningitis Dec 2006 Now seemingly a normal little monster.
    Love to my two angels that I will never forget.
    • cheekymole
    • By cheekymole 20th Oct 05, 11:23 AM
    • 3,288 Posts
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    cheekymole
    • #4
    • 20th Oct 05, 11:23 AM
    • #4
    • 20th Oct 05, 11:23 AM
    Yes, that's right, as long as you soak the fruit for a couple of days before and then, once it's cooked, keep it wrapped in the greaseproof in an airtight container and feed it once a month with alocohol, you will have a deliciously moist Christmas cake. I've made mine in December before now and just fed it every couple of days and it was still just as nice (so I'm told anyway, I hate the stuff!!!)
    I haven't got one!
    • 16011996
    • By 16011996 20th Oct 05, 12:57 PM
    • 8,140 Posts
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    16011996
    • #5
    • 20th Oct 05, 12:57 PM
    • #5
    • 20th Oct 05, 12:57 PM
    am making mine this weekend. always do do it first weekend of half term hols. no idea why, just habbit i guess.
    • grannysmith
    • By grannysmith 20th Oct 05, 1:24 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 5 Thanks
    grannysmith
    • #6
    • 20th Oct 05, 1:24 PM
    • #6
    • 20th Oct 05, 1:24 PM
    In my family Xmas cakes and puddings should be made Bonfire night!
    • Zziggi
    • By Zziggi 20th Oct 05, 10:21 PM
    • 2,388 Posts
    • 2,234 Thanks
    Zziggi
    • #7
    • 20th Oct 05, 10:21 PM
    • #7
    • 20th Oct 05, 10:21 PM
    I did a cake decorating course and the tutor (a qualified cake decoarator who ran her own business) said that if you want your cake to 'mature' quicker because you've made it last minute, then freeze it, let it thaw fully and then decorate. She said she makes her cakes last week in november/first week in december ready for xmas. i tried this method with a fruit cake(non-alcoholic) i made earlier in the year and the freezing process did no harm to the cake.
  • Queenie
    • #8
    • 21st Oct 05, 2:21 AM
    • #8
    • 21st Oct 05, 2:21 AM
    Traditionally, Christmas Cakes were made at Easter (when eggs were at they cheapest).

    These days, recipes don't feature in the magazines/shop recipe cards until around now (or, couple of weeks ago).

    Christmas cake can be left to mature for a couple of years with a regular top up of alcohol (the alcohol acting as a preservative - but, the cake must be wrapped and stored well).

    My boys made their first this week and it smells delicious! But, we'll be eating that *this* year. (Children don't have the patience to wait a year or two )
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    • neets
    • By neets 21st Oct 05, 9:23 AM
    • 48 Posts
    • 23 Thanks
    neets
    • #9
    • 21st Oct 05, 9:23 AM
    Baking a Christmas Cake - Brown Paper??
    • #9
    • 21st Oct 05, 9:23 AM
    Ok, i'm about to make my first attempt at a christmas cake, and have chosen Delia's recipe, only problem being it states that you have to wrap brown paper round the outside of the cake tin for protection while it's cooking. I haven't got any brown paper therefore, my question is, is it essential to do this, and/or has anybody any suggestions for alternatives to brown paper??

    Any help in preventing a potential disaster would be much appreciated!
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 21st Oct 05, 9:30 AM
    • 13,808 Posts
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    squeaky
    Yep - greaseproof paper will work just as well. It is a good idea to help protect the top of the cake from burning.

    We have another very recent thread on Christmas Cake so I'll merge this post into it shortly.

    Best of luck
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
    • apprentice tycoon
    • By apprentice tycoon 21st Oct 05, 9:30 AM
    • 3,286 Posts
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    apprentice tycoon
    Newspaper does the job just as well....smells lovely as it bakes!

    edit -you don't need string either - I just staple strips of folded newspaper together and wrap them around the tin and secure with a couple of paperclips
    Last edited by apprentice tycoon; 21-10-2005 at 9:49 AM.
  • rchddap1
    Ohhh that reminds me....its feeding time. Must remember to do that when I get home later.
    Baby Year 1: Oh dear...on the move

    Lily contracted Strep B Meningitis Dec 2006 Now seemingly a normal little monster.
    Love to my two angels that I will never forget.
    • neets
    • By neets 21st Oct 05, 9:35 AM
    • 48 Posts
    • 23 Thanks
    neets
    Thanks for the speedy replys, I'll try the greaseproof paper (it sounds a bit safer than newspaper! )
    • Zziggi
    • By Zziggi 21st Oct 05, 2:54 PM
    • 2,388 Posts
    • 2,234 Thanks
    Zziggi
    If you are making a cake for a relative that maybe lives on their own so you want a small cake. A tip is use one of those small baked bean tins or one of those heinz sponge pudding tins.

    If you use the Heinz sponge pudding tin then by the time you have put marzipan and icing on, it's a good size cake for a person on their own, or a couple. I've done this and it makes a nice sized cake.
    • chrislee765
    • By chrislee765 21st Oct 05, 3:03 PM
    • 375 Posts
    • 155 Thanks
    chrislee765
    Has anyone got a tried and tested method which they use ever year and is very popular. I want to make a cake, but there are so many different recipes to choose from!

    Thanks
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    Find a job you love and you'll never work a day in your life.
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  • MrsB
    Am I the only person in OS land that makes my Christmas cake without marzipan or icing and eats it with Cheese??

    I'm a Yorkshire lass originally and was always told it was traditional up here?? :confused: Regardless - it's lush. Yum Yum
    I'd rather be a could-be if I cannot be an are; because a could-be is a maybe who is reaching for a star. I'd rather be a has-been than a might-have-been, by far; for a might have-been has never been, but a has was once an are Milton Berle
    • squeaky
    • By squeaky 21st Oct 05, 3:16 PM
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    • 15,843 Thanks
    squeaky
    I'm Yorksher born and bred too - and while with cheese is OK... my sweet tooth goes for marzipan and icing every time
    Hi, I'm a Board Guide on the Old Style and the Consumer Rights boards which means I'm a volunteer to help the boards run smoothly and can move and merge posts there. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com. It is not part of my role to deal with reportable posts. Any views are mine and are not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.

    Never ascribe to malice that which is adequately explained by incompetence.
    DTFAC: Y.T.D = 5.20 Apr 0.50
  • kingshir
    I make my Xmas cake in September (actually I make 2 , one that we eat straight away and the 'proper' one) and I use a boiled fruit cake recipe from a Bero (is that spelt right?) baking book that I've had for the last 40 ish years. It is delicious and never lasts longer than New Years Day!
  • MrsB
    Oh no Squeaky!!! You traitor you!!

    I absolutely loath and detest marzipan so it's a no go for me.

    And actually, if I'm really honest, I my absolute favourite way to eat it is just plain by itself with a lovely hot cuppa. Heaven

    I'm making mine tomorrow
    I'd rather be a could-be if I cannot be an are; because a could-be is a maybe who is reaching for a star. I'd rather be a has-been than a might-have-been, by far; for a might have-been has never been, but a has was once an are Milton Berle
  • Queenie
    Am I the only person in OS land that makes my Christmas cake without marzipan or icing and eats it with Cheese??

    I'm a Yorkshire lass originally and was always told it was traditional up here?? :confused: Regardless - it's lush. Yum Yum
    by MrsB
    You're not alone (my Mother was a Yorkshire lass) and she gave us cheese with it sometimes I'm not a "sweet tooth" anyway, so it suited me to a T

    Mind you, she would also lighter fry leftover Christmas Pudding in a little bit of butter (Plays havoc with the waistline )
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