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  • FIRST POST
    • Pickleyo8
    • By Pickleyo8 16th Jun 19, 11:28 PM
    • 2Posts
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    Pickleyo8
    Can i refuse hours increase
    • #1
    • 16th Jun 19, 11:28 PM
    Can i refuse hours increase 16th Jun 19 at 11:28 PM
    I am 18 about to start a seasonal job. In my contract it states that my contracted hours are 12 hours a week (no days/times specified), that my normal week is a 2 day week, but that the employer has the right to increase/decrease/change my hours with reasonable notice.

    Can I refuse a change in hours? I am flexible in terms of which hours and can cover absences etc occasionally, but have personal responsibilities at home which means the amount of hours a week I can work is limited. I can only really work 3 days a week/18 hours a week max. As it is seasonal, it is highly likely they will ask my to increase my hours over summer holiday period.

    Do i have a right to refuse either random rota hours changes or permanent contracted hours increases? If i refuse can they fire me or will i likely be allowed to continue my usual contracted hours?
Page 1
    • Rainbowgirl84
    • By Rainbowgirl84 16th Jun 19, 11:31 PM
    • 967 Posts
    • 1,693 Thanks
    Rainbowgirl84
    • #2
    • 16th Jun 19, 11:31 PM
    • #2
    • 16th Jun 19, 11:31 PM
    They can fire you.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 17th Jun 19, 1:11 AM
    • 39,903 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    • #3
    • 17th Jun 19, 1:11 AM
    • #3
    • 17th Jun 19, 1:11 AM
    They can fire you, but let's not get ahead of ourselves.

    ATM you have a contract for 12 hours, over 2 days. My advice would be to start, get stuck in, do the best job you can, and see if you can get to know how things work for your colleagues. Are there constant moans about HAVING to work extra shifts at short notice? Is everyone working twice the days / hours they're contracted to? How much notice do you get of your shifts / shift changes?

    Once you're known as a good worker is the time to try to make your manager aware of your situation. They don't have to care, and your home responsibilities aren't their concern, but a decent employer will know that just firing someone because they can't (or even won't) work an extra shift with very little notice won't actually help their staffing problems.

    And if they're not a decent employer, start looking elsewhere as soon as you realise that ...
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats, 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself, multiple poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: ready to decrease / decreasing on all parts of the mohair cardigan pattern! but moved onto wrist warmers for friends at Christmas ...
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 17th Jun 19, 7:38 AM
    • 6,566 Posts
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    TELLIT01
    • #4
    • 17th Jun 19, 7:38 AM
    • #4
    • 17th Jun 19, 7:38 AM
    The contract says that hours / days can be changed at reasonable notice, and for seasonal work that doesn't seem unreasonable. Of course you can refuse to change your work pattern and, of course, they can decide to dispense with your services.
    • ACG
    • By ACG 17th Jun 19, 8:21 AM
    • 19,160 Posts
    • 10,765 Thanks
    ACG
    • #5
    • 17th Jun 19, 8:21 AM
    • #5
    • 17th Jun 19, 8:21 AM
    My understanding is that if your contract is for 12 hours a week, they have to pay you for 12 hours even if you are not needed?

    If you have been there for less than 2 years, they can dismiss you for any reason - literally something as minor as the colour of your socks.

    Most contracts have some sort of caveat in there for amending hours, very few call on it, especially if they have a few embers of staff, you will probably find some want the extra hours. But I suppose the fact it is in there means it can happen.
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    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 17th Jun 19, 9:05 AM
    • 34,571 Posts
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    DCFC79
    • #6
    • 17th Jun 19, 9:05 AM
    • #6
    • 17th Jun 19, 9:05 AM
    Why not just take the job, you don't know what will happen in terms of how many extra hours you could be asked to work.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 17th Jun 19, 10:01 AM
    • 2,359 Posts
    • 3,744 Thanks
    shortcrust
    • #7
    • 17th Jun 19, 10:01 AM
    • #7
    • 17th Jun 19, 10:01 AM
    Another vote here for take the job and see what happens. You may never be asked to do extra shifts, and if you are they might be reasonable when you say you can't do it. There might be other people there who are always keen to hoover up extra hours.

    Yes they could show you the door if you donít do the hours they ask, but if it got to that point you'd be leaving a job that had turned into something you donít want anyway so would it be a terrible loss?

    Donít make a fuss about it until it happens. Saying you can do x, y and z on your first day isnít a good look unless it's because you're looking after kids, going for dialysis etc.
    • jonnygee2
    • By jonnygee2 17th Jun 19, 10:50 AM
    • 1,438 Posts
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    jonnygee2
    • #8
    • 17th Jun 19, 10:50 AM
    • #8
    • 17th Jun 19, 10:50 AM
    Are you male or female? Are your responsibilities to do with childcare?

    As your contract says hours could be raised, then raising the hours is obviously not a breach of contract. However in many cases it could be considered unfair dismissal.

    Still, that's last resort, not something you really want to get into in a part time summer job. Mostly, employment should be a two way relationship based on trust and mutual benefit.

    For me the most obvious next step would just be to mention to them you've noticed the contract says that and ask how likely it would be. After all if it's a summer job, it may not be worth continuing if its likely the relationship will break down in the next couple of months
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 17th Jun 19, 3:18 PM
    • 3,412 Posts
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    steampowered
    • #9
    • 17th Jun 19, 3:18 PM
    • #9
    • 17th Jun 19, 3:18 PM
    Another vote for taking the job.

    It is very normal for students to be doing fairly casual jobs, and to get asked whether you want to do extra shifts or not.

    If you are offered extra shifts and you don't want them, simply decline.
    • Pickleyo8
    • By Pickleyo8 18th Jun 19, 2:11 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Pickleyo8
    Thanks everyone
    I have taken it, i just wanted to know where i stand with my rights, it seems they are reasonable about my situation
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 18th Jun 19, 10:24 PM
    • 39,903 Posts
    • 37,154 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    Are you male or female? Are your responsibilities to do with childcare?
    Originally posted by jonnygee2
    I think those questions are all but irrelevant. They would only come into play if the OP was in a minority, and their 'minority' was being treated differently to the majority. But it could still be a tough one to prove.

    And childcare does not give carte blanche to do what suits you work-wise, nor does it trump caring for elderly relatives / other family members.

    What you do with your spare time and why you can't work more of it isn't actually your employer's concern or business. As I said, a decent employer won't fire someone for not being able to increase hours at the drop of a hat, but they don't have to care or take your reasons into account.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats, 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself, multiple poppies, 3 peony flowers, 4 butterflies ...
    Current projects: ready to decrease / decreasing on all parts of the mohair cardigan pattern! but moved onto wrist warmers for friends at Christmas ...
    • duchy
    • By duchy 24th Jun 19, 9:26 PM
    • 18,264 Posts
    • 46,621 Thanks
    duchy
    I used to work for " a large pub chain" basically school hours .
    I'd sometimes be asked if I could work on or come in and do a weekend evening shift. Sometimes I Could and did , othertimes I didn't . It was an odd dynamic as those who always said yes were taken for granted . I had a manager moan to me that he'd asked two people to work their day off and both refused. I pointed out both had been working double shifts seven days a week for the past four weeks and they were both exhausted.
    Gave him food for thought as he always saw me doing extra as a favour but had taken umbrage when those whose willingness to work extra he'd taken for granted said no.
    Funny things managers.
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