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  • FIRST POST
    • snowqueen555
    • By snowqueen555 14th Jun 18, 10:18 AM
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    snowqueen555
    Social Care vacancies requiring "paid experience"
    • #1
    • 14th Jun 18, 10:18 AM
    Social Care vacancies requiring "paid experience" 14th Jun 18 at 10:18 AM
    A little vent here!

    I've been applying for bank staff positions in social care as an idea to supplement my income. I have 18 months voluntary experience so thought I would be okay, but I've had several rejections because a lot of places seem to require 6 months paid experience as a minimum.

    It's very hard to get that experience is no-one is willing you give you a chance.

    Feels like a kick in the teeth because part of volunteering is that it is a way to gain experience as well as doing some good in the community.
Page 1
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 14th Jun 18, 10:22 AM
    • 4,822 Posts
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    sangie595
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 18, 10:22 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Jun 18, 10:22 AM
    If you've been working voluntarily for 18 months, can't you get some paid work at the place you are volunteering?
    • brewthebear
    • By brewthebear 14th Jun 18, 10:38 AM
    • 135 Posts
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    brewthebear
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 18, 10:38 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Jun 18, 10:38 AM
    Bank staff implies experienced staff as you are going into a care enviroment and be expected to know what your doing.
    Volunteering is not the same,
    • brewthebear
    • By brewthebear 14th Jun 18, 10:40 AM
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    brewthebear
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 18, 10:40 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Jun 18, 10:40 AM
    Another thing volunteers will never be allowed to do the proper work of a carer as there would be no h/s or insurance to cover you.
    • snowqueen555
    • By snowqueen555 14th Jun 18, 11:43 AM
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    snowqueen555
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 18, 11:43 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Jun 18, 11:43 AM
    I do understand to some degree, but It's a pain in the !!!!.

    A classic case of I can't gain experience if no-one will offer me it.
    • fraserbooks
    • By fraserbooks 14th Jun 18, 9:05 PM
    • 316 Posts
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    fraserbooks
    • #6
    • 14th Jun 18, 9:05 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Jun 18, 9:05 PM
    In the organisation where I worked before retirement bank staff received a higher hourly rate than permanent staff and were expected to be more experienced. Normally you had to work for six months and pass your probation and mandatory training before you could become a bank employee. Do you have valid food hygiene, first aid, manual handling and other certificates? I think your best bet would be to get a permanent position at an organisation where you want to work for six months and take it from there. It could be part time.
    • snowqueen555
    • By snowqueen555 14th Jun 18, 11:23 PM
    • 722 Posts
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    snowqueen555
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 18, 11:23 PM
    • #7
    • 14th Jun 18, 11:23 PM
    good point, why do bank get paid more? I had noticed this
    • stator
    • By stator 15th Jun 18, 12:14 AM
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    stator
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 18, 12:14 AM
    • #8
    • 15th Jun 18, 12:14 AM
    Temps usually get paid more, substitute teachers, locum doctors etc the work is more unpredictable. Usual trade off of pay vs stability.
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • snowqueen555
    • By snowqueen555 11th Jul 18, 8:33 PM
    • 722 Posts
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    snowqueen555
    • #9
    • 11th Jul 18, 8:33 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Jul 18, 8:33 PM
    I thought I would update you all. After searching I have found some luck. DBS just went through for one position, I turned down work in another place (retirement home) because it looked a little depressing to work in.

    If you look hard enough, maybe around 10% of places working in care will actually train you up, I suppose the other 90% don't really care to do that.

    Considering the future demand for care staff will go through the roof, it is a shame most companies don't want to train people up.

    -

    Most bank staff get paid more because employers pay your holiday allowance on top as salary.
    • beckysheffield
    • By beckysheffield 11th Jul 18, 8:52 PM
    • 230 Posts
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    beckysheffield
    Fantastic!
    • ViolaLass
    • By ViolaLass 11th Jul 18, 8:55 PM
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    ViolaLass
    Temps usually get paid more, substitute teachers, locum doctors etc the work is more unpredictable. Usual trade off of pay vs stability.
    Originally posted by stator
    Substitute teachers do not get more than contract teachers. At best they get the same.
    • kitkatt1982
    • By kitkatt1982 11th Jul 18, 9:34 PM
    • 110 Posts
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    kitkatt1982
    Another thing volunteers will never be allowed to do the proper work of a carer as there would be no h/s or insurance to cover you.
    Originally posted by brewthebear
    Just wanted to reply to this. I volunteer and do pretty much the same as the workers. I have received full training as part of my voluntary position and am fully insured. I volunteer for a domestic abuse charity so would be classed as being in the social care sector. I guess it depends on the type of work. I’d imagine personal care may involve a higher level of insurance so may require ‘paid’ experience but non personal care such as support work etc shouldn’t x
    • Jackandn
    • By Jackandn 11th Jul 18, 11:26 PM
    • 23 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    Jackandn
    Hi Snowqueen

    I work in care and if your wanting to get experience and in your area you can't find work that will pay I would instead go to an agency and work on an ad hoc basis in various sites. I find it surprising that a care company would say need experience as most companies are understaffed. If you work via an agency you then should get that 6 month position and be able to pursue with an individual company or stay with the agency.
    • snowqueen555
    • By snowqueen555 11th Jul 18, 11:32 PM
    • 722 Posts
    • 512 Thanks
    snowqueen555
    Hi Snowqueen

    I work in care and if your wanting to get experience and in your area you can't find work that will pay I would instead go to an agency and work on an ad hoc basis in various sites. I find it surprising that a care company would say need experience as most companies are understaffed. If you work via an agency you then should get that 6 month position and be able to pursue with an individual company or stay with the agency.
    Originally posted by Jackandn
    My experience job hunting is quite the opposite. Agencies seem to have a high turnover and are for profit. They require paid experience so they can hire staff and not need to do anything with regards to training.

    I think the main reason is that the cost to bring someone in and for them to leave because the job is not for them is quite costly.

    The places where I have had luck are with the not for profit trusts. I don't know how their funding is gained, but they definitely have a culture most similar to a charity or council.
    Last edited by snowqueen555; 11-07-2018 at 11:35 PM.
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 12th Jul 18, 12:00 AM
    • 3,283 Posts
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    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    I find it surprising that a care company would say need experience as most companies are understaffed.
    Originally posted by Jackandn
    Think it depends where you live, quality of job, whether you pay for own DBS and wage.

    I attended job interview on 30th November last year, in a care home (I'll always remember as it was pretty instrumental in giving up a job to attend almost immediately)
    ironically it was one of the never heard back from with a local workforce of 60 (so better staffed then some of the offices I've sat in)
    And part of a group with head office but no was never acknowledged after interview whatsoever for all I hear about the care industry as so short staffed.

    Most beautifully written job advert but like I say never heard back. (Though Sister in law who has lived in my town all her life said it was known as a hellhole and on that basis I didn't pursue)
    Last edited by keepcalmandstayoutofdebt; 12-07-2018 at 12:02 AM. Reason: .
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 12th Jul 18, 12:04 AM
    • 4,822 Posts
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    sangie595
    Substitute teachers do not get more than contract teachers. At best they get the same.
    Originally posted by ViolaLass
    They do where I live and work! Supply teachers are better paid than contacted school staff, but have no security and are paid only for their actual working time.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 12th Jul 18, 1:50 AM
    • 38,721 Posts
    • 35,509 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    good point, why do bank get paid more? I had noticed this
    Originally posted by snowqueen555
    Because they work 'as and when required', and have to 'hit the ground running and pick up speed' in any new situation. I'm not surprised you had difficulty picking up bank work with no paid experience, even if you feel you were doing exactly the same as the staff while you were volunteering, the responsibility lay with them, and I'd anticipate that whether you realised it or not there was more supervision going on than if you'd been a paid member of staff.

    Most bank staff get paid more because employers pay your holiday allowance on top as salary.
    Originally posted by snowqueen555
    Plus that too, although the holiday pay MUST be listed separately on your payslip.
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