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  • FIRST POST
    • pimento
    • By pimento 19th Sep 19, 10:11 AM
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    pimento
    Upstairs laundry - possible?
    • #1
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:11 AM
    Upstairs laundry - possible? 19th Sep 19 at 10:11 AM
    We're buying a house that is much smaller than the one we currently have and although it's just about perfect, the kitchen is smaller and the washing machine is currently in the kitchen (integrated).

    I would like to be able to move the washing machine to make another cupboard space available but the only place I can think of to move it to is upstairs.

    Bedroom 2 will be my husband's office. It's a large room (13' x 11') and has an alcove (presumably for a wardrobe) that backs directly onto the bathroom.

    Is it sensible/feasible to put the washer behind a sliding door in the bedroom/office? I assume there will be plumbing available due to the proximity of the bathroom.

    Is there any reason why this isn't a good idea?

    Thanks for any advice or opinions.
    "If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." -- Red Adair
Page 1
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 19th Sep 19, 10:23 AM
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    peachyprice
    • #2
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:23 AM
    • #2
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:23 AM
    Two things come to mind, how you're going to get the bloomin' thing up there! and vibrations and noise while it's in use.

    My ex MIL had a machine in an upstairs bathroom, that was very noisy when in use, it was like a jumbo taking off when it went into a spin, but it was only over the kitchen so not liveable. That was an old Victorian house with bare floorboards though.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • JimmyChanga
    • By JimmyChanga 19th Sep 19, 10:35 AM
    • 215 Posts
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    JimmyChanga
    • #3
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:35 AM
    • #3
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:35 AM
    As peachyprice said, on wooden joists on spin mode it can sound really noisy.
    • pimento
    • By pimento 19th Sep 19, 10:38 AM
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    pimento
    • #4
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:38 AM
    • #4
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:38 AM
    Yes, I hadn't thought of that. The bedroom is directly above the kitchen and the house is four years old. Does that make a difference?

    My shower pump sits on a thick, rubber mat. Would something like that make a difference?
    "If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." -- Red Adair
    • Fire Fox
    • By Fire Fox 19th Sep 19, 10:52 AM
    • 25,155 Posts
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    Fire Fox
    • #5
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:52 AM
    • #5
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:52 AM
    Consider fire risk and flooding risk. Do you usually do laundry whilst home and awake, or would you run errands or go to sleep whilst the washing machine is running?
    Declutterbug-in-progress.⭐️⭐️⭐️ ⭐️⭐️
    • Cisco001
    • By Cisco001 19th Sep 19, 10:56 AM
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    Cisco001
    • #6
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:56 AM
    • #6
    • 19th Sep 19, 10:56 AM
    I don't think it is good idea.
    If there is not enough cupboard space, I would rather get a cupboard to store stuff in dinning room or living room.
    • pimento
    • By pimento 19th Sep 19, 11:53 AM
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    pimento
    • #7
    • 19th Sep 19, 11:53 AM
    • #7
    • 19th Sep 19, 11:53 AM
    OK, thanks everyone.
    "If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." -- Red Adair
    • Fen1
    • By Fen1 19th Sep 19, 12:16 PM
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    Fen1
    • #8
    • 19th Sep 19, 12:16 PM
    • #8
    • 19th Sep 19, 12:16 PM
    A lot of kitchen units don't go all the way up to the ceiling. There can be several feet of space completely wasted in the kitchen because of this. The area above a door can also have shelves or a cupboard fitted.

    Rationalize what you actually need in the kitchen. Food and utensils that you use every day need to be kept in the kitchen. Rarely used baking tins and novelty Christmas china don't.
    • pimento
    • By pimento 19th Sep 19, 1:09 PM
    • 5,777 Posts
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    pimento
    • #9
    • 19th Sep 19, 1:09 PM
    • #9
    • 19th Sep 19, 1:09 PM
    A lot of kitchen units don't go all the way up to the ceiling. There can be several feet of space completely wasted in the kitchen because of this. The area above a door can also have shelves or a cupboard fitted.

    Rationalize what you actually need in the kitchen. Food and utensils that you use every day need to be kept in the kitchen. Rarely used baking tins and novelty Christmas china don't.
    Originally posted by Fen1
    Funnily enough, I'm thinking of taking the current L shaped kitchen and making it a U shape.
    The only problem is that the window is about six inches lower than a standard kitchen worktop. I was wondering whether I could put the sink under the window and put a back onto the sink unit making the window a kind of well.

    I'm not explaining is very well...

    A bit like this:

    http://www.vamzteam.com/countertop/c1f94/window-sill-lower-than-countertop/low-window-sill-behind-sink-and-counter-kitchen.html
    "If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." -- Red Adair
    • EssexExile
    • By EssexExile 19th Sep 19, 1:12 PM
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    EssexExile
    There's nothing wrong with having the washing machine upstairs, lots of people do it. Better quality modern machines don't shake about as much as old ones but it will still be noisier than on a solid floor.

    Getting it there is hard work & when you buy a new one check the delivery policy, some won't go upstairs. If you have a sack barrow & a couple of healthy blokes it's do-able.

    I don't see why fire risk is any worse upstairs & leaks are rarely catastrophic, we have baths & loos upstairs & tanks in the loft after all.
    Tall, dark & handsome. Well two out of three ain't bad.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 19th Sep 19, 1:17 PM
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    DigForVictory
    The lady in the bungalow over the road sleeps on the same floor as her washing machine & tumble drier - I think where the drying will happen is more of an issue as lugging a load of wet clean laundry downstairs lacks appeal.
    Anyone with an office likely with technology may have views on damp etc.
    • jennifernil
    • By jennifernil 19th Sep 19, 8:50 PM
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    jennifernil
    Not all houses have a solid (concrete?) ground floor, I have lived in 4 houses in my lifetime and all had wooden floors on wooden joists on both the ground and upper floors.

    In our previous house we had the problem that the kitchen was too small to have enough space for both our dishwasher and our washing machine, while the bathroom upstairs was large and had plenty of unused space.

    We had the WM in the bathroom, far enough away from any water source that you could not touch water and the WM at the same time. It was plugged in out on the landing. We had it like this for 6 years, until we extended to make a new kitchen and the old one became the utility room, and had no problems with excessive noise due to the floor being wooden.

    My niece, who lives in Norway, made an upstairs utility room, with both washer and dryer and loves it. After all, most dirty washing is generated upstairs in the bedrooms and bathroom. Her whole house is built of wood.

    Our present house has the utility room and all the bedrooms downstairs, living rooms and kitchen upstairs, I find it very convenient to have the WM on the same level as the bedrooms.

    Regarding putting units in front of a low windowsill, my sister-in-law has an older house where all the windowsills are quite low and she has done this in her kitchen. The sill was cut back flush with the wall and a board was fixed to continue the wall line up and a few inches beyond the worktop, that way things do not get pushed off the back of the worktop.
    • jennifernil
    • By jennifernil 19th Sep 19, 9:09 PM
    • 5,150 Posts
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    jennifernil
    We're buying a house that is much smaller than the one we currently have and although it's just about perfect, the kitchen is smaller and the washing machine is currently in the kitchen (integrated).

    I would like to be able to move the washing machine to make another cupboard space available but the only place I can think of to move it to is upstairs.

    Bedroom 2 will be my husband's office. It's a large room (13' x 11') and has an alcove (presumably for a wardrobe) that backs directly onto the bathroom.

    Is it sensible/feasible to put the washer behind a sliding door in the bedroom/office? I assume there will be plumbing available due to the proximity of the bathroom.

    Is there any reason why this isn't a good idea?

    Thanks for any advice or opinions.
    Originally posted by pimento
    One other thought....

    Could you incorporate that alcove in bedroom 2 into the bathroom and make a utility cupboard?

    A friend who has a house on 3 levels, semi-basement, ground floor and rooms in the roof, again all wooden floors, has made a utility cupboard in the ground floor bathroom to "future proof" their home. (This level also has the living rooms, kitchen, and a bedroom)

    In their case they removed the bath and used the space to make the utility cupboard and a large shower area. They have the Tumble dryer stacked on top of the washing machine.

    Even if you cannot incorporate the space into the bathroom, the idea of a utility cupboard is a good one.
    • Clive Woody
    • By Clive Woody 19th Sep 19, 10:04 PM
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    Clive Woody
    My wife lived in the States for a while and the house she rented had the machines upstairs in a cupboard, the washing machine on the floor with the tumble drier above it.

    I think a lot of EU folk have their washing machines in the bathroom, it seems the UK is a bit odd in having the washing machine in the kitchen.

    So long as their is plumbing and possible sound insulation I don't see too many restrictions on where you put it (other than washing machines are pretty heavy to shift around)
    "We act as though comfort and luxury are the chief requirements of life, when all that we need to make us happy is something to be enthusiastic about” – Albert Einstein
    • pimento
    • By pimento 20th Sep 19, 8:43 AM
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    pimento
    Great stuff.

    Yes, the new house is a town house with the kitchen and living room on the ground floor (and a WC - too small for the washer). The middle floor is two large bedrooms and a bathroom between them and the top floor is the main bedroom, ensuite and dressing room. It's a bit top heavy but suits us apart from the washing machine problem which, if I can re-configure the kitchen may not be such a big problem.

    Layout is like this:

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/pq16jb7jn0e9rf9/layout.PNG?dl=0
    "If you think it's expensive to hire a professional to do the job, wait until you hire an amateur." -- Red Adair
    • naf123
    • By naf123 20th Sep 19, 9:40 AM
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    naf123
    We have it upstairs in the cupboard despite the risks of flooding.

    Yes washing machine does shake the floor a bit (we have a very very heavy miele) when on spin - but we do not use it at night.

    Dryer (above washing machine) does not shake the floor etc

    However, we did tile the floor of the washing machine cupboard.

    If I could afford to, I would have put a drain in the cupboard - in that way if the washing machine floods, it would drain off - you would need to find a shower tray of the appropriate size/material - or find a tiler to incorporate a drain......use your imagination!
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 20th Sep 19, 2:52 PM
    • 5,348 Posts
    • 6,139 Thanks
    robatwork
    My wife lived in the States for a while and the house she rented had the machines upstairs in a cupboard, the washing machine on the floor with the tumble drier above it.

    I think a lot of EU folk have their washing machines in the bathroom, it seems the UK is a bit odd in having the washing machine in the kitchen.
    Originally posted by Clive Woody
    This. We are in the minority having dirty clothes where we cook rather than dirty clothes exactly where we take our clothes off.

    However lots of EU houses have concrete floors upstairs which makes it more stable/safe/quiet.
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 20th Sep 19, 3:04 PM
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    getmore4less
    Then there are American houses timber framed with timber floors with laundry rooms upstairs very common.

    Why do we have so many problems with building in the UK.

    Things like basements and laundry upstairs should be a doddle.
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 20th Sep 19, 3:35 PM
    • 20,377 Posts
    • 47,244 Thanks
    peachyprice
    Then there are American houses timber framed with timber floors with laundry rooms upstairs very common.

    Why do we have so many problems with building in the UK.

    Things like basements and laundry upstairs should be a doddle.
    Originally posted by getmore4less
    Probably because we're all crammed together in terraces/semis, unlike the US where so many more family homes are detached. It's a lot easier when you don't have to worry about disturbing your neighbours.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 20th Sep 19, 6:41 PM
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    getmore4less
    Probably because we're all crammed together in terraces/semis, unlike the US where so many more family homes are detached. It's a lot easier when you don't have to worry about disturbing your neighbours.
    Originally posted by peachyprice
    There are plenty of duplex double family homes, townhouse blocks and apartment blocks built timber frame in more built up areas.
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