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  • FIRST POST
    • pinkcollins212
    • By pinkcollins212 8th Sep 19, 2:15 PM
    • 2Posts
    • 1Thanks
    pinkcollins212
    New Build Electric Only
    • #1
    • 8th Sep 19, 2:15 PM
    New Build Electric Only 8th Sep 19 at 2:15 PM
    Hello,

    I needs some advice, I have seen a new build property that I would like to rent, however - its electric only.

    Now I have read horror stories, and have only lived in gas/electric places before. Im currently back at my parents which is a 5 bed and the combined bills and with solar panels.

    This flat am interested in is a 1 bed. Build was finished this July. Its an EPC rated B. With the below specs

    Walls : Average thermal transmittance 0.19 W/m2K - 5 *

    Roof : other premises - above no rating

    Floor : Average thermal transmittance 0.21 W/m2K - 4*

    Windows: High performance glazing - 5*

    Heating : Room heaters, electric - no rating

    Heating Controls : Programmer and room thermostats - 4*

    Secondary Heating : None

    Hot Water : Electric immersion, standard tariff - no rating

    Lighting : Low energy lighting in all fixed outlets - 5*

    Air Tightness: Air permeability 4.1 m3/h.m2 (as tested) - 4*



    Thermal transmittance is a measure of the rate of heat loss through a building element; the lower the value the better the energy performance.

    Air permeability is a measure of the air tightness of a building; the lower the value the better the air tightness.

    Current primary energy use per square metre of floor area: 126 kWh/m2 per year


    Low and zero carbon energy sources are sources of energy that release either very little or no carbon dioxide into the atmosphere when they are used.

    Installing these sources may help reduce energy bills as well as cutting carbon.

    The following low or zero carbon energy sources are provided for this home:
    Solar photovoltaics


    -

    Now Im budgeting 80 a month lower end, 150 top end costs. I work full time Monday - Friday, so will only be about in the evenings and weekends. But after reading horror stories over bills, Im having doubts.

    Any tips or thoughts welcome
Page 1
    • Robin9
    • By Robin9 8th Sep 19, 2:30 PM
    • 4,981 Posts
    • 3,251 Thanks
    Robin9
    • #2
    • 8th Sep 19, 2:30 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Sep 19, 2:30 PM
    It's a new build and super insulated - I'm surprised it's a B and not A.

    Learn how to operate the room heaters / thermostats !
    Never pay on an estimated bill
    • RelievedSheff
    • By RelievedSheff 8th Sep 19, 3:24 PM
    • 549 Posts
    • 519 Thanks
    RelievedSheff
    • #3
    • 8th Sep 19, 3:24 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Sep 19, 3:24 PM
    Our new build is EPC rated B. The recommendations to get it to an A rating are to install solar panels at great cost.

    I would think most typical new builds are band B not A.

    To the OP. I dont think your Bill's will be high in a new build flat. Modern electric heaters are relatively cheap to run and if our three bed detached new build is anything to go by you wont need the heating much anyway!

    I would think your budget should easily cover the costs.
    • J B
    • By J B 8th Sep 19, 6:33 PM
    • 3,524 Posts
    • 1,351 Thanks
    J B
    • #4
    • 8th Sep 19, 6:33 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Sep 19, 6:33 PM
    Hot Water : Electric immersion, standard tariff - no rating
    Originally posted by pinkcollins212
    Should be on an 'economy 7' type tarrif.


    Modern electric heaters are relatively cheap to run
    Originally posted by RelievedSheff

    They cost the same as old ones, sorry!
    • EnergyRookie
    • By EnergyRookie 9th Sep 19, 10:13 AM
    • 55 Posts
    • 42 Thanks
    EnergyRookie
    • #5
    • 9th Sep 19, 10:13 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Sep 19, 10:13 AM
    Hello,

    I needs some advice, I have seen a new build property that I would like to rent, however - its electric only.

    Now I have read horror stories, and have only lived in gas/electric places before. Im currently back at my parents which is a 5 bed and the combined bills and with solar panels.

    This flat am interested in is a 1 bed. Build was finished this July. Its an EPC rated B. With the below specs

    Walls : Average thermal transmittance 0.19 W/m2K - 5 *

    Roof : other premises - above no rating

    Floor : Average thermal transmittance 0.21 W/m2K - 4*

    Windows: High performance glazing - 5*

    Heating : Room heaters, electric - no rating

    Heating Controls : Programmer and room thermostats - 4*

    Secondary Heating : None

    Hot Water : Electric immersion, standard tariff - no rating

    Lighting : Low energy lighting in all fixed outlets - 5*

    Air Tightness: Air permeability 4.1 m3/h.m2 (as tested) - 4*



    Thermal transmittance is a measure of the rate of heat loss through a building element; the lower the value the better the energy performance.

    Air permeability is a measure of the air tightness of a building; the lower the value the better the air tightness.

    Current primary energy use per square metre of floor area: 126 kWh/m2 per year


    Low and zero carbon energy sources are sources of energy that release either very little or no carbon dioxide into the atmosphere when they are used.

    Installing these sources may help reduce energy bills as well as cutting carbon.

    The following low or zero carbon energy sources are provided for this home:
    Solar photovoltaics


    -

    Now Im budgeting 80 a month lower end, 150 top end costs. I work full time Monday - Friday, so will only be about in the evenings and weekends. But after reading horror stories over bills, Im having doubts.

    Any tips or thoughts welcome
    Originally posted by pinkcollins212
    80 pcm is 960 pa
    150 pcm is 1800 pa

    An average household pays about 1185pa on a standard variable rate (usually the supplier's most expensive offering), but savings of 330+ pa can be achieved by switching to a low priced tariff. (So that would be 855pa or less)
    These figures are based on a dual fuel tariff, but also the average home is much larger than a 1 bed flat, and is usually occupied a lot more than you plan to occupy this property.

    So your budget should be fine, especially if you seek the best deal for you. Take regular meter readings, and keep an eye on your energy statements.

    More information on getting the cheapest deal for you available in this really helpful MSE guide
    https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/utilities/you-switch-gas-electricity/
    • EnergyRookie
    • By EnergyRookie 9th Sep 19, 10:14 AM
    • 55 Posts
    • 42 Thanks
    EnergyRookie
    • #6
    • 9th Sep 19, 10:14 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Sep 19, 10:14 AM
    Should be on an 'economy 7' type tarrif.
    ...
    Originally posted by J B
    Presumably, based on the report, this brand new rental property only has a single rate meter fitted.
    • pinkcollins212
    • By pinkcollins212 9th Sep 19, 4:37 PM
    • 2 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    pinkcollins212
    • #7
    • 9th Sep 19, 4:37 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Sep 19, 4:37 PM
    Thank you all.

    I just needed some reassurance, seeing threads and posts of people having bills up to 400 a month for electric only places scared me a little.

    Bulb quote me 36 a month based on estimates of in insulation, etc

    Single rate meter

    Electricity
    Tariff name Vari-Fair Electricity
    Tariff type Variable
    Payment method Direct debit
    Unit rate 13.262p per kWh
    Standing charge 20.44p per day (74.62 per year)
    Assumed annual cost 426.36 per yea

    Obviously, with the way my heating and water will be generated, that estimate is far too low.

    I did find this, regarding immersion heating.

    Cost of heating a full water tank using an electric immersion heater
    Tank Capacity Per Tank Per Year*
    120 litres 1.12 814.08
    150 litres 1.39 1,017.60
    180 litres 1.67 1,221.12
    210 litres 1.95 1,424.64
    250 litres 2.32 1,696.00
    300 litres 2.79 2,035.20
    400 litres 3.72 2,713.60
    *Based on heating mains water from 15 to 60 (recommended for hot water storage) using the UK Average rate of 17.78p/kWh (December 2018 tariff). Totals do not include keeping the tank at the required temperature between heating cycles and assume 100% efficiency. Per year costs are based on 2 heating cycles per day.


    On that, I would only really be heating that once a day, and if Im feeling frugal, Ill boil a kettle and whack the water in the sink. As I wouldnt be heating twice in the day

    Heating I can give or take, from back when I did shift work, coming home to a cold house was normal - thermal socks, dressing gowns and candles can do a lot of good.

    So unless I have heating on all the time, and leave all appliances turned on, I shouldnt see stupid bills.
    • coffeehound
    • By coffeehound 9th Sep 19, 4:50 PM
    • 3,309 Posts
    • 5,917 Thanks
    coffeehound
    • #8
    • 9th Sep 19, 4:50 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Sep 19, 4:50 PM
    I did find this, regarding immersion heating.

    Cost of heating a full water tank using an electric immersion heater
    Tank Capacity Per Tank Per Year*
    120 litres 1.12 814.08
    .
    .
    *Based on heating mains water from 15 to 60 (recommended for hot water storage) using the UK Average rate of 17.78p/kWh (December 2018 tariff). Totals do not include keeping the tank at the required temperature between heating cycles and assume 100% efficiency. Per year costs are based on 2 heating cycles per day.
    Originally posted by pinkcollins212
    Yes that's a very pessimistic estimate because it assumes that all the hot water in the tank is used up and replaced by cold water (twice). In reality, unless a big family, the water left in the tank during the day won't all be used up and since modern tanks are well-insulated, the water will not cool further and won't require so much electricity to heat back up again.
    • FelineFunk
    • By FelineFunk 10th Sep 19, 10:51 AM
    • 28 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    FelineFunk
    • #9
    • 10th Sep 19, 10:51 AM
    • #9
    • 10th Sep 19, 10:51 AM
    Thank you all.

    I just needed some reassurance, seeing threads and posts of people having bills up to 400 a month for electric only places scared me a little.

    Bulb quote me 36 a month based on estimates of in insulation, etc

    ...
    Originally posted by pinkcollins212
    Use the same assumed usage figures as Bulb have, and consult a comparison site to see how much more you could save elsewhere.

    Seeing threads and posts of people, Bulb don't seem very cheap.

    Alternatively, use a couple of comparison sites to estimate your anticipated usage. Then see how accurate the bulb estimate was by comparison. You'll also be able to see just how far Bulb are down the list when consuilting those comparison sites too.
    Last edited by FelineFunk; 10-09-2019 at 10:54 AM.
    • J B
    • By J B 10th Sep 19, 8:52 PM
    • 3,524 Posts
    • 1,351 Thanks
    J B
    Presumably, based on the report, this brand new rental property only has a single rate meter fitted.
    Originally posted by EnergyRookie
    So ... why not get it changed for an E7 one?????????
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