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    • zeupater
    • By zeupater 7th Jan 13, 5:36 PM
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    zeupater
    Solar ... In the news
    • #1
    • 7th Jan 13, 5:36 PM
    Solar ... In the news 7th Jan 13 at 5:36 PM
    Hi All

    Thought it was about time we had a thread specifically to discuss relevant press articles relating to solar pv & thermal ..... so here goes ...

    Z
    Last edited by zeupater; 07-01-2013 at 5:48 PM.
    "We are what we repeatedly do, excellence then is not an act, but a habit. " ...... Aristotle
Page 135
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 29th Sep 19, 1:32 PM
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    GreatApe
    Australian billionaire to back $14 billion solar power supply to Singapore: AFR

    Note - Australia and Japan are still working out the details, legislation and safety requirements to ship Aussie sunlight, in the form of hydrogen, in the form of ammonia (probably) to Japan.

    Australian shipping sunlight instead of coal, funny ole world.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981

    Yeh right

    The Japanise are not going to buy ammonia for a penny more than they will purchase LNG for
    And LNG prices are falling and will continue to fall thanks to shale gas and more LNG facilities

    LNG prices may fall to 2 US cents per KWh
    Good luck trying to build a super inefficient solar to hydrogen to ammonia industry at comparable cost

    Likewise a HVDC cable from Australia to Anywhere needs to be cheaper than domestic production
    Not likely with offshore and onshore wind undercutting solar from quarter of a world away
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 2nd Oct 19, 8:04 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Sunny Cali and $22/MWh PV and storage, flippin eck.

    California firm contracts ‘astoundingly’ cheap solar-plus-storage pipeline

    The US state of California has witnessed yet another claim of ultra-low solar prices, recorded in the context of a major contracting exercise by a community energy group.

    The board of East Bay Community Energy (EBCE), the power supplier of San Francisco-neighbouring Alameda County, waved through deals last Friday to acquire 225MW of solar and 80MW / 160MWh of battery energy storage.

    The late September procurement – coming off the back of earlier deals in June and July – brings EBCE’s purchase pipeline volumes up to 550MW of clean energy and 137.5MW / 390MWh of energy storage, set to supply residents in Oakland and others in the county.

    According to EBCE, the solar portfolio resulting from this year’s procurement raft was contracted at average prices of US$22/MWh. Commenting on the latest deals on social media, the group’s CEO Nick Chaset described the figure as “astoundingly low".


    And Germany rolls out nearly 3GWp of PV just this year so far, that's approx 20% of the UK's whole PV figure.

    Germany added 2.72 GW of PV in eight months

    In August alone, around 327 MW of new solar generation capacity was registered in the country. This month the FIT for solar systems up to 750 kW in size will fall another 1.4%.
    This month the FIT for solar systems with a generation capacity no larger than 750 kW will fall another 1.4%. In the ‘direct marketing’ system category – mandatory for arrays with a generation capacity above 100 kW – the FIT payment is €0.0742/kWh.

    For 40-750 kW roof systems the FIT will be €0.0818/kWh, for up-to-10 kW systems the payment will be €0.1058/kWh. All 10-40 kW arrays will receive €0.1030/kWh.

    According to the Bundesnetagentur, Germany reached a cumulative solar capacity of around 48.65 GW by the end of August, just 3.35 GW short of the long-standing 52 GW cap which was set to halt incentives but which the German government has pledged to remove under its new Climate Change Act.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 4th Oct 19, 4:13 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Solar carports and storage, what's not to like:

    SunPower awarded solar-plus-storage carports in California

    US solar firm SunPower is to deploy 3.7MW of solar carports across 10 locations in Contra Costa County, California, with some of the sites using energy storage.

    The firm will install its Helix Roof and Carport systems in order to offset 68% of power taken from the grid by the County, which amounts to savings of US$16.5 million over a period of 25 years.

    Three out of the ten sites will also feature Helix Storage systems with a combined capacity of 1.5MW / 3MWh that will provide further demand charge savings.

    And an old but continuing story/idea regarding Australia, long supply lines, and the falling costs of PV and storage - which once threatened too, and now actually is leading to on-grid locations becoming off-grid, as it's simply better / more economic. Sign of the times perhaps and the ever falling costs of RE and storage.

    Australia’s Horizon to replace overhead network with solar and batteries
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 6th Oct 19, 8:46 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Perovskite (n a remarkably short time) is closing in on silicon 'normal' efficiencies, so if degradation can be resolved, quite an opportunity for cheap, flexible PV applications.

    But more importantly, to me, this will mean progress towards seriously high efficiency perovskite/silicon panels one day in the 30%'s, even high 30's. Approx twice the gen most of us probably have, from the same roof space. Ouch!

    International Research Team Claims New Perovskite Solar Record — 18.1%
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Reed_Richards
    • By Reed_Richards 7th Oct 19, 6:59 AM
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    Reed_Richards
    The reason we use silicon for solar panels is entirely because it is cheap. Vastly greater efficiencies could be achieved with the types of semiconductor used for LEDs, modern light bulbs or for the lasers used for fibre-optic telecommunications. But these are tiny devices and if scaled-up to the size of a solar panel would be very expensive to manufacture.
    Reed
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 7th Oct 19, 7:18 AM
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    Martyn1981
    The reason we use silicon for solar panels is entirely because it is cheap. Vastly greater efficiencies could be achieved with the types of semiconductor used for LEDs, modern light bulbs or for the lasers used for fibre-optic telecommunications. But these are tiny devices and if scaled-up to the size of a solar panel would be very expensive to manufacture.
    Originally posted by Reed_Richards
    Yes, silicon is very cheap, but thin film perovskite is much, much cheaper again. Using perovskite inks it can even be printed onto products such as rolls of flexible plastic film which can be attached to surfaces that aren't flat, or where weight is an issue.

    Whereas silicon has been developed for 60yrs or so now, perovskite is a baby of this decade but coming up fast, the main problem being it degrades rapidly, in miniutes, back at the start, but getting better all the time.

    Obviously combining the two technologies will make for a more expensive product (normally), but as perovskite is so cheap, it's expected that silicon/perovskite panels will cost the same (per Wp), so a PV farm could be installing say 35% efficient panels instead of 20% efficient panels, and whilst the bill for the PV will be 75% more (75% more Wp's), the other costs (land, transport, labour, racking etc) won't change, giving a big drop in the cost of leccy £'s/MWh.

    For us (the demand side), imagine getting twice the generation from the same roof, or being able to leave the shaded part completely, or properties with rooves too small to be economic (before), or wall mounted PV, which at 70% of roof mounted might not be cost effective, but at nearly twice the generation, now comes into play - sensitive issue, but let's mention cladding blocks of flats.

    Sorry for the waffle, but in short, PV is already a success all around the World, even in less ideal locations (like the UK) so falling costs, plus rising efficiencies make it a solid 'banker' for the future.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 10th Oct 19, 8:31 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Big, BIG numbers out of Germany. They have decided to aim for 98GWp by 2030. They are currently at 48GWp and close to the 'old' cap of 52GWp. For comparison the UK has ~13GWp.

    The article points to possible figures far higher, both for 2030 and 2040:

    Germany gets behind solar with 98GW-by-2030 goal

    The addition of the 98GW-by-2030 goal in the weeks since was cautiously welcomed by national PV body BSW -Solar today, right after the target was confirmed. The goal, BSW-Solar said, was a step in the right direction but needs to go further and to become "legally concrete".

    "We have to reach this milestone in half the time – in the mid-2020s – if we take the climate goals seriously", BSW-Solar’s CEO Carsten Körnig said today, as he urged the German government to raise the 2030 target even further from the new 98GW threshold.

    The association pointed at a review it commissioned earlier this year, which said installed PV capacity should triple to 162GW by 2030 – not merely doubling, as the government intends – if Germany is to plug the power gaps left by the massive decommissioning of coal and nuclear.

    Carried out by energy consultancy EuPD, the analysis urged Germany to drive more long-term PV growth by setting a 252GW target by 2040. Such expansion, EuPD advised, should cover ground-mounted PV (126.7GW of the total) but also C&I (91GW) and domestic (35GW) plants.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 10th Oct 19, 8:34 AM
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    Martyn1981
    An ironic article! Poland still relies on coal for the vast majority of its leccy generation, but it seems the mines might know better?

    Another Polish coal mine powered by solar

    Polish energy company Enea plans to build a 30 MW solar park to power coal mining activity at the Bogdanka mine near Łęczna, in the southeastern province of Lesser Poland.

    Enea, the majority shareholder of the Lubelski Węgiel Bogdanka S.A. company which owns the mine, said the solar facility will power operations through a long-term power purchase agreement.

    The 55ha solar park will generate up to 30,000 MWh of electricity per year. “The photovoltaic farms that will be established in our areas will supply clean production processes in the mine, contribute to reducing our fixed costs and increase our competitiveness,” the company said in a statement.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 10th Oct 19, 10:20 AM
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    GreatApe
    Big, BIG numbers out of Germany. They have decided to aim for 98GWp by 2030. They are currently at 48GWp and close to the 'old' cap of 52GWp. For comparison the UK has ~13GWp.

    The article points to possible figures far higher, both for 2030 and 2040:

    Germany gets behind solar with 98GW-by-2030 goal
    Originally posted by Martyn1981

    This is great news and means the UK should definitely ban all PV support
    We can just import the German excess for close to £0/MWh directly and indirectly with the 15-20GW of links to the EU we will have by 2030

    PV developers should be free to sell into the UK grid at whatever the wholesale price is for when they are generating (close to zero thanks to the feast and famine output of solar) so if they can make PV work for prices close to zero fantastic
    • GreatApe
    • By GreatApe 10th Oct 19, 10:48 AM
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    GreatApe


    German public paying
    €74-103 euro per MWh for PV
    So the energy companies can export it for 10-30 Euro/MWh to next door neighbours

    The UK should stay away and go for offshore wind
    The 15-20GW links to the EU countries can allow us to import cheap PV if we need it because our offshore wind isn't blowing

    100 GW of offshore wind will sort out the UK
    40% CF summer, 60% winter Perfect more output in the winter when we need more energy
    Makes no sense for 5% winter 15% summer PV at double offshore prices especially when Germany and pals will be desperate to export their excess solar at prices close to zero
    • Solarchaser
    • By Solarchaser 10th Oct 19, 6:16 PM
    • 198 Posts
    • 262 Thanks
    Solarchaser
    I thought for a day or so you had dropped the trolling, and were actually going to contribute.

    Silly me!
    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 11th Oct 19, 8:52 AM
    • 305 Posts
    • 489 Thanks
    pile-o-stone
    I thought for a day or so you had dropped the trolling, and were actually going to contribute.

    Silly me!
    Originally posted by Solarchaser
    This is the board that moderation forgot.
    5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
    Solar iBoost+ to two immersion heaters on 300L thermal store.
    Vegan household with 100% composted food waste
    Mini orchard planted and vegetable allotment created.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 11th Oct 19, 9:06 AM
    • 2,733 Posts
    • 4,102 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    I thought for a day or so you had dropped the trolling, and were actually going to contribute.
    Originally posted by Solarchaser

    The only way I can tell is that they come along in threes, like buses, but I've no idea where they're going, (apart from the occasional confirmatory quote). It's quite refreshing..


    The Lowry Beck man came yesterday and the gas was still the same as my April reading, so well done solar panels. 5.58kWh into the immersion yesterday, although the way the weather is looking it looks like the boiler will be on a bit for hot water tomorrow.



    By the looks of it outside the wind farms will be taking over! I might pop over to Zarch's site to see how cheap the variable tariff was last night..
    • Solarchaser
    • By Solarchaser 11th Oct 19, 5:23 PM
    • 198 Posts
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    Solarchaser
    Down to 2p in my region.

    That's been a week now the agile has been below the go.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 13th Oct 19, 5:45 PM
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    silverwhistle
    Thanks, I'm not sure it makes making a decision any easier!;-)
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 16th Oct 19, 1:53 PM
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    Martyn1981
    Dubai v's Portugal

    DEWA bags $0.016953/kWh tariff for 900MW of Dubai solar park

    The Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) has confirmed that it fielded a tariff of US$1.6953 cents per kWh in a recent tender for a 900MW plot of its 5GW Mohammed bin Rashid (MbR) solar parks – a bid it claims sets a world record for the indepedent power producer (IPP) model.

    The tariff comes very close to the record bid of €1.476 cents per kWh – or US $1.644 cents per kWh by today’s exchange rate – lodged in a Portuguese government auction in August.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 16th Oct 19, 1:55 PM
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    Martyn1981
    PV / PV & storage exports to the UK grid have grown, quite a bit.

    Storage exports jump 600% as solar sees ‘exponential’ increase, new figures show

    Exports to GB distribution networks of solar PV rose from 194GWh in 2012 to 8TWh in 2018, according to the data.

    While exports from battery storage rose from 50MWh in 2014 to almost 49GWh in 2018. Between 2017 and 2018, there was a 600% increase in battery exports.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 29th Oct 19, 7:41 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Just another Perovskite story, and all going (fingers crossed) in the right direction:

    No-Gold Perovskite Solar Cells Aim A Dagger At The Heart Of Fossil Fuels

    The good news can be found in the new study, titled (spoiler alert!) “Carbon-based materials for stable, cheaper and large-scale processable perovskite solar cells,” which appears in the journal Energy & Environmental Science of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

    In the study, Fagiolari and Bella undertake an intensive review of recent research activity. They conclude that carbon-based materials (surprise!) could replace gold for the back electrode in perovskite solar cells.

    Specifically, they highlight graphite/amorphous carbon, graphene, and carbon nanotubes.

    Aside from low cost and ease of fabrication, Fagiolari and Bella note that these materials are “highly hydrophobic.” In other words, they help solve perovskite’s moisture problem while sparing the expense of building extra moisture-proofing into the solar cell.

    Fabiolari and Bella do take stock of several issues that carbon-based materials need to overcome. Nevertheless, they propose that back electrodes made with graphite and carbon black have a good chance to beat gold at its own game.

    As for why they are so confident, that’s a good question. They followed the research activity and noted that before 2012, every article on perovskite solar cells dealt with liquid electrolytes. The carbon angle began to pop up after 2012, when solid-state technology made an appearance.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 29th Oct 19, 8:16 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Tesco's and EDF 'giving it large!'

    Tesco unveils major green electricity project, including 187 onsite rooftop solar installs

    Supermarket giant Tesco has announced a major green electricity project, including the installation of solar panels on 187 of its sites covering 335,000m2.

    The project will also include a ground-mounted solar farm and five onshore wind farms. In total, the new projects will generate enough power for the equivalent of 140,000 homes.

    EDF secures a slice of UK supermarket Tesco’s corporate solar plan

    The French energy giant will provide supermarket Tesco with electricity from 17 rooftop PV installations and two wind farms for a renewables portfolio generation capacity of 59 MW. The groceries retailer has announced plans to install 187 solar rooftops.
    The EDF deals relate to 59 MW of renewable energy generation capacity the company will deploy for the retailer – 17 rooftop PV installations in England and two onshore wind farms in Scotland. The PPA for the solar projects is related to 5 MW of rooftop generation capacity and will hold for 20 years.

    EDF Renewables will install 15,000 PV modules on the roofs of 17 Tesco stores in England. With construction already under way, all the PV systems should be operational next year. The projects are part of EDF Group’s CAP 2030 strategy, which aims to double its renewables capacity worldwide to 50 GW.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 29th Oct 19, 8:31 AM
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    Martyn1981
    Not sure 35GWp is a 'starring role'*, but it's still a massive increase in UK deployments, and a return to an appropriate FiT (perhaps just a few pence now), would be good news, especially if it was applied retrospectively to those that have installed without it, the same way it was done for those folk who had PV before 2010.

    *Actually, perhaps I should take that back, it would be approx 10% of current leccy demand, and whilst I'd prefer to see something akin to 20% of the larger future demand, it's still significant for a 'not exactly' sunny country like the UK.

    Opposition party pledges to nearly treble UK solar capacity in 10 years

    The UK’s opposition Labour Party has pledged to almost treble the country’s solar PV capacity, taking it to 35GW by 2030.

    The party today unveiled its ‘Thirty by 2030’ vision, a document comprising thirty policies the party would enact to fast-track decarbonisation of the country’s economy within the next ten years.

    Central to the document is a commitment to derive almost 90% of the country’s power from renewable and zero-carbon resources by 2030, with solar set to play a starring role.

    Labour said it intended to almost treble the country’s current solar PV generation capacity - ~13GW – to around 35GW by 2030. Such an achievement would require the UK to return to an annual growth rate of around 2GW, similar to that enjoyed in its prime.

    Labour envisages that around 4.5GW of that 35GW figure would be small-scale, requiring a total of 2.25 million homes to have solar installed, at an average system size of 2kWp. To stimulate the further deployment the party has pledged to reinstate the feed-in tariff. The UK had a FiT in place until March this year when it was closed to new applicants.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
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