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  • FIRST POST
    • SuperSeagull
    • By SuperSeagull 13th Aug 19, 10:30 PM
    • 113Posts
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    SuperSeagull
    internet on Ubunto
    • #1
    • 13th Aug 19, 10:30 PM
    internet on Ubunto 13th Aug 19 at 10:30 PM
    Can anybody give a complete novice a simple step by step guide of how to connect to wireless wifi in newly installed Ubunto. EG go to ?? click on?? then go to ?? etc. Thank you.
    Last edited by SuperSeagull; 13-08-2019 at 10:34 PM.
Page 1
    • psychic teabag
    • By psychic teabag 14th Aug 19, 12:02 AM
    • 2,810 Posts
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    psychic teabag
    • #2
    • 14th Aug 19, 12:02 AM
    • #2
    • 14th Aug 19, 12:02 AM
    As in the other thread, first thing to do is find out what hardware you have, and whether any necessary firmware has been installed.

    lspci or inxi in a terminal window should list hardware. Might need to install the inxi package if it isn't installed by default. (Using whatever software package manager you prefer.)

    https://sourcedigit.com/22009-ubuntu-system-information-command-line-ubuntu-hardware-information/

    Looks like there's also lshw and lshw-gtk (a graphical front end) available. I haven't tried any of these. ('ls' is the linux command line to list files. So it's commonly used as a prefix in other commands that list things, such as lspci = list pci devices ; lshw = list hardware ; lsusb = list usb devices.)

    It's a while since I've set up wireless. I tend to edit text config files rather than using gui tools (and I probably use archaic network tools rather than the current batch). One command that's useful is
    sudo iwlist scan
    which shows a list of access points the network can see.
    • SuperSeagull
    • By SuperSeagull 14th Aug 19, 2:38 AM
    • 113 Posts
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    SuperSeagull
    • #3
    • 14th Aug 19, 2:38 AM
    • #3
    • 14th Aug 19, 2:38 AM
    Sorry that is all too technical for me I do not understand it.

    When I had Windows installed to the left of the power button is a wifi button (blue) which came on but with Ubunto this does not show up and I cannot switch it on.
    Last edited by SuperSeagull; 14-08-2019 at 3:11 AM.
    • thorganby
    • By thorganby 14th Aug 19, 7:19 AM
    • 290 Posts
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    thorganby
    • #4
    • 14th Aug 19, 7:19 AM
    • #4
    • 14th Aug 19, 7:19 AM
    Can anybody give a complete novice a simple step by step guide of how to connect to wireless wifi in newly installed Ubunto. EG go to ?? click on?? then go to ?? etc. Thank you.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    It is years since I made the first WiFi connection on a clean install and the only problem that I remember that was it would not connect if my router was set to channel 13.

    After changing the channel number to a more standard channel in the range 1 - 11 it connected fine.

    Step by step instructions here:

    https://help.ubuntu.com/stable/ubuntu-help/net-wireless-connect.html.en

    You will also fine more helpful tutorials etc. on the community forum here:

    https://help.ubuntu.com/stable/ubuntu-help/index.html.en
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 14th Aug 19, 7:34 AM
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    DoaM
    • #5
    • 14th Aug 19, 7:34 AM
    • #5
    • 14th Aug 19, 7:34 AM
    It is years since I made the first WiFi connection on a clean install and the only problem that I remember that was it would not connect if my router was set to channel 13.

    After changing the channel number to a more standard channel in the range 1 - 11 it connected fine.
    Originally posted by thorganby
    That's usually more a sign that the WiFi card in the device is a US model ... CH13 isn't available in the US but it is in the UK. (I had the same problem with my work's Dell laptop when I took it home to use ... my home network back then was using CH13 and my work laptop couldn't see it).
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • DoaM
    • By DoaM 14th Aug 19, 7:36 AM
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    DoaM
    • #6
    • 14th Aug 19, 7:36 AM
    • #6
    • 14th Aug 19, 7:36 AM
    Can anybody give a complete novice a simple step by step guide of how to connect to wireless wifi in newly installed Ubunto. EG go to ?? click on?? then go to ?? etc. Thank you.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    I guess this shows that your fundamental problem isn't the Linux distro you're trying to use, seeing as you had the exact same issue with Mint.
    Diary of a madman
    Walk the line again today
    Entries of confusion
    Dear diary, I'm here to stay
    • thorganby
    • By thorganby 14th Aug 19, 7:53 AM
    • 290 Posts
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    thorganby
    • #7
    • 14th Aug 19, 7:53 AM
    • #7
    • 14th Aug 19, 7:53 AM
    I guess this shows that your fundamental problem isn't the Linux distro you're trying to use, seeing as you had the exact same issue with Mint.
    Originally posted by DoaM
    I think that you are making assumptions and jumping to conclusions here, as this laptop has not first been connected to the net to allow any necessary drivers to be downloaded, whereas these may not require downloading for ubuntu to connect via wireless.

    e.g. Mint does not install any dependency marked: Recommends.

    The problem is Mint does not install any dependency marked: Recommends.

    Ubuntu does by default but Mint does not.

    More info on this here:

    https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=185770

    Think positive!
    • psychic teabag
    • By psychic teabag 14th Aug 19, 9:45 AM
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    psychic teabag
    • #8
    • 14th Aug 19, 9:45 AM
    • #8
    • 14th Aug 19, 9:45 AM
    I guess this shows that your fundamental problem isn't the Linux distro you're trying to use, seeing as you had the exact same issue with Mint.
    Originally posted by DoaM
    I think the differences between the different distributions tends to be in the installers and the choice of graphical tools / desktop. They all tend to use the same low-level pieces (and of course, kernel). (systemd vs traditional init was a differentiator for a while, but I think that battle has been lost.)

    That's also the reason it's harder to give you an answer along the lines of "bring up this tool, choose the 4th item from the 3rd menu and choose the second radio button in the dialogue that pops up. We all have slightly different desktops and distribution-specific gui tools installed on our systems for configuring this stuff. (Or none - as I said, I tend to find it easier just to edit the text config files directly.) But the underlying command-line tools tend to be the same on different systems. I imagine that the people who actually maintain the low-level systems use command-line tools rather than gui tools to configure them (though I have no evidence for this). It's a lot easier to automate tests and things with command-line tools.

    I probably could have helped you with mint, since I have one running downstairs (to help when MIL needs support with her mint system), but even then, it's a couple of years out of date, and mint has more than one desktop I believe.

    debian does have a very strict policy on what it considers free, so will tend to resist giving you non-free software by default. That includes the firmware for devices. Not sure to what extent ubuntu and mint deviate from this. (They are both derivatives of debian with their own policies.)
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 14th Aug 19, 12:50 PM
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    esuhl
    • #9
    • 14th Aug 19, 12:50 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Aug 19, 12:50 PM
    I think the differences between the different distributions tends to be in the installers and the choice of graphical tools / desktop. They all tend to use the same low-level pieces (and of course, kernel). (systemd vs traditional init was a differentiator for a while, but I think that battle has been lost.)
    Originally posted by psychic teabag
    Not really -- there's quite a few different components. For example, what software do you use to connect to wifi? wireless_tools, iw, wpa_supplicant, iwd...? Maybe you have one of the many network managers that acts as a graphical front-end to one or more of the wireless components?

    Anyway, once you know what software your distro uses to connect wirelessly, you should be able to find the documentation to set it up.
    • SuperSeagull
    • By SuperSeagull 14th Aug 19, 5:44 PM
    • 113 Posts
    • 8 Thanks
    SuperSeagull
    Where do I type that command wireless_tools etc . I have replaced Mint with Ubunto but still not able to connect to the internet. I am now drawn between going to my local repair shop to ask their advice or accepting that Linux is not for me and reverting back to re installing Windows 10.
    • that
    • By that 14th Aug 19, 6:02 PM
    • 1,168 Posts
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    that
    SuperSeagull, you probably already have addressed this, so I appolgise in advance for not reading things thoroughly trough!

    But why do you not plug it into an ethernet port, just so that it get onto the network, and from there after you can go wireless again. Or, plug it into someone elses network port, then take them to the pub - cheaper than going to the shop

    Network cables are cheap too
    • EveryWhere
    • By EveryWhere 14th Aug 19, 6:17 PM
    • 2,267 Posts
    • 1,140 Thanks
    EveryWhere
    Where do I type that command wireless_tools etc . I have replaced Mint with Ubunto but still not able to connect to the internet. I am now drawn between going to my local repair shop to ask their advice or accepting that Linux is not for me and reverting back to re installing Windows 10.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    Are you mad? Total waste of money. Better to spend that on another SSD and yo fit that to the Compaq.

    To be honest, I have no idea as to what it is that is your current problem.
    • psychic teabag
    • By psychic teabag 14th Aug 19, 7:00 PM
    • 2,810 Posts
    • 1,657 Thanks
    psychic teabag
    Where do I type that command wireless_tools etc . I have replaced Mint with Ubunto but still not able to connect to the internet. I am now drawn between going to my local repair shop to ask their advice or accepting that Linux is not for me and reverting back to re installing Windows 10.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    wireless_tools isn't a command, it's a package of utilities. Ubuntu will have a graphical tool for installing packages - might be called synaptic or something. (Or just "software manager".) I use the command-line tools.

    $ apt-cache search wireless-tools
    python-wicd - wired and wireless network manager - Python module
    wicd - wired and wireless network manager - metapackage
    wicd-cli - wired and wireless network manager - scriptable console client
    wicd-curses - wired and wireless network manager - Curses client
    wicd-daemon - wired and wireless network manager - daemon
    wicd-gtk - wired and wireless network manager - GTK+ client
    wireless-tools - Tools for manipulating Linux Wireless Extensions
    But obviously to do that, you'll need to be connected to the network. Can you connect to the internet temporarily using a wired connection to your router ?

    (You can download the packages manually via another computer, then copy them onto the system and install them manually, but it's a bit long-winded trying to do things that way.)

    The desktop almost certainly has friendly tools to configure the wireless, and if that's not working, it is possibly because the required drivers aren't installed. (There are loads of drivers available - ubuntu wouldn't install them all by default.)

    So we're suggesting that the first step is to identify the networking hardware you have on your system, and report here. Then we can move to the next step - ensuring that you have the necessary drivers and firmware installed. Once we've got there, we can try to figure out if there's another reason why you can't connect to your wireless network (which may involve some of those wireless tools).


    Please issue the command lspci in a terminal window and post the output.

    Or if you have a wired connection, install the inxi tool (using package manager of your choice, or apt-get on the command line), and then show us the output from that.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 14th Aug 19, 7:19 PM
    • 8,436 Posts
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    Norman Castle
    Where do I type that command wireless_tools etc . I have replaced Mint with Ubunto but still not able to connect to the internet. I am now drawn between going to my local repair shop to ask their advice or accepting that Linux is not for me and reverting back to re installing Windows 10.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    I've used Mint for over 5 years and refuse to type garbage into terminals. I don't understand it and don't want to know. The biggest difference between linux and windows is the people that use them. Linux users like their garbage .
    I got very used to xp then moved to mint and couln't find anything. When I use friends windows 7 or 10 pc's I don't know where things are.

    To answer your original question but based on mint hoping ubunto is similar, if you have an image of two cables connected on the bottom right, possibly disconnected with a red x if there is no wired connection, try left or right clicking on it. This might show available networks including yours which you can choose then add your password.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 14-08-2019 at 7:32 PM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 14th Aug 19, 7:35 PM
    • 8,951 Posts
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    esuhl
    Where do I type that command wireless_tools etc .
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    Wireless_tools, etc. are software packages. Each package has its own set of commands. I was just explaining that there can be a lot of differences between Linux distros.

    So it's important to refer to the documentation that's specific to the distro you're using: https://help.ubuntu.com/

    I have replaced Mint with Ubunto but still not able to connect to the internet. I am now drawn between going to my local repair shop to ask their advice or accepting that Linux is not for me and reverting back to re installing Windows 10.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    If you can explain the problem you're having, someone here might be able to help. What didn't work when you followed the wireless connection guide?

    Have you tried the steps outlined on the "Wireless network troubleshooter" page?

    https://help.ubuntu.com/stable/ubuntu-help/net-wireless-troubleshooting.html.en
    • esuhl
    • By esuhl 14th Aug 19, 7:44 PM
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    esuhl
    When I had Windows installed to the left of the power button is a wifi button (blue) which came on but with Ubunto this does not show up and I cannot switch it on.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull

    So... this is a laptop with built-in wifi, right? What's the make and model number? Perhaps you need to install some chipset drivers...?
    • thorganby
    • By thorganby 15th Aug 19, 8:57 AM
    • 290 Posts
    • 231 Thanks
    thorganby
    SuperSeagull

    Perhaps you could kindly explain why after starting another thread "internet on ubuntu" asking for specific step by step instructions, you have only replied to the latest post on your return and have ignored all other previous posts?


    To summarise in this post:

    Post 1
    Can anybody give a complete novice a simple step by step guide of how to connect to wireless wifi in newly installed Ubunto. EG go to ?? click on?? then go to ?? etc. Thank you.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    Post 2
    As in the other thread, first thing to do is find out what hardware you have, and whether any necessary firmware has been installed.

    lspci or inxi in a terminal window should list hardware. Might need to install the inxi package if it isn't installed by default. (Using whatever software package manager you prefer.)

    https://sourcedigit.com/22009-ubuntu-system-information-command-line-ubuntu-hardware-information/

    Looks like there's also lshw and lshw-gtk (a graphical front end) available. I haven't tried any of these. ('ls' is the linux command line to list files. So it's commonly used as a prefix in other commands that list things, such as lspci = list pci devices ; lshw = list hardware ; lsusb = list usb devices.)

    It's a while since I've set up wireless. I tend to edit text config files rather than using gui tools (and I probably use archaic network tools rather than the current batch). One command that's useful is
    sudo iwlist scan
    which shows a list of access points the network can see.
    Originally posted by psychic teabag
    Post 3 your reply
    Sorry that is all too technical for me I do not understand it.

    When I had Windows installed to the left of the power button is a wifi button (blue) which came on but with Ubunto this does not show up and I cannot switch it on.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    Post 4 providing exactly the step by step instructions that you requested

    It is years since I made the first WiFi connection on a clean install and the only problem that I remember that was it would not connect if my router was set to channel 13.

    After changing the channel number to a more standard channel in the range 1 - 11 it connected fine.

    Step by step instructions here:

    https://help.ubuntu.com/stable/ubuntu-help/net-wireless-connect.html.en

    You will also find more helpful tutorials etc. on the community forum here:

    https://help.ubuntu.com/stable/ubuntu-help/index.html.en
    Originally posted by thorganby
    Post 10 your rather strange and unexpected reply

    Where do I type that command wireless_tools etc . I have replaced Mint with Ubunto but still not able to connect to the internet. I am now drawn between going to my local repair shop to ask their advice or accepting that Linux is not for me and reverting back to re installing Windows 10.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull

    You have provided no useful feedback to allow anyone to help you further e.g. exactly what you have done or where you need help to proceed.

    By simply typing the following simple command into a terminal window, you would be able to inform us of the network wireless interface adapter fitted to your laptop.

    e.g. typing sudo lshw followed by enter will return something like this if you scroll down to network:


    *-network
    description: Wireless interface
    product: BCM4312 802.11b/g LP-PHY
    vendor: Broadcom Inc. and subsidiaries


    P.S.

    You would be wise to ignore this contradictory and unhelpful post:

    Post 14
    I've used Mint for over 5 years and refuse to type garbage into terminals. I don't understand it and don't want to know. The biggest difference between linux and windows is the people that use them. Linux users like their garbage .
    I got very used to xp then moved to mint and couln't find anything. When I use friends windows 7 or 10 pc's I don't know where things are.

    To answer your original question but based on mint hoping ubunto is similar, if you have an image of two cables connected on the bottom right, possibly disconnected with a red x if there is no wired connection, try left or right clicking on it. This might show available networks including yours which you can choose then add your password.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle

    Because in your previous thread "Windows to Linux" he admits that he has never achieved what you have requested help to do, i.e. connect to the internet using wireless!

    My pc has never connected wirelesley with mint but does with windows although I can view all local wireless signals and strength including my own but it doesn't connect.

    To change things in Mint often I am asked for an administration password which is clearly one I input during or immediately after installing mint. Can you re install over the current installation or format the drive then start again this time noting any passwords and letting it run until it completes.
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    Anyone incapable of achieving this after using linux for five years is not the person that you should be taking advice from!
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 15th Aug 19, 9:53 AM
    • 8,436 Posts
    • 7,282 Thanks
    Norman Castle

    P.S.

    You would be wise to ignore this contradictory and unhelpful post:
    Originally posted by thorganby
    I suspect the op is struggling with the basics of finding things on a new os. Its pointless trying to resolve a fault with an operating system without confirming there is a fault!


    Anyone incapable of achieving this after using linux for five years is not the person that you should be taking advice from!
    I looked into sorting it but got 10 different answers telling me to type 10 variants of nonsense into terminals from Linux "experts". This is for a laptop with a knackered battery so doesn't need a wireless connection because it never moves. Life's too short.

    Enjoy indulging your hobby but please understand some people simply want to use a computer and not mess with them.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 15-08-2019 at 10:14 AM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • psychic teabag
    • By psychic teabag 15th Aug 19, 10:19 AM
    • 2,810 Posts
    • 1,657 Thanks
    psychic teabag
    I suspect the op is struggling with the basics of finding things on a new os. Its pointless trying to resolve a fault with an operating system without confirming there is a fault!
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    That's a fair point. We have some context from other thread:
    My basic problem is being able to access the internet, which I cannot seem to do with Mint. I have gone to WIFI and added a connection which shows up as being there and I have gone into the security and added the key for it but I do not know how to go to the next stage of connection.
    Originally posted by SuperSeagull
    but since that was with mint rather than ubuntu, it could just be that ubuntu will just work once SS finds the correct gui. We'll just have to wait for an update.

    One way to proceed is:
    confirm that the kernel has detected some hardware
    confirm that the device firmware is installed
    check if the device can scan for any networks
    try to join one

    I'd probably binary chop, and jump straight to trying a network scan - if that works, there's probably no need to check if driver / firmware are there. However, if that was working, it might have been a fair assumption that the installer would have been able to configure it automatically. So given that it didn't, it's not unreasonable to go back and start from the beginning.
    • debitcardmayhem
    • By debitcardmayhem 15th Aug 19, 10:30 AM
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    debitcardmayhem
    Or as thorganby said but try
    sudo lshw -class network
    Still grumpy, and No, Cloudflare I am NOT a robot
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