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    • ben0101
    • By ben0101 6th Dec 18, 6:31 PM
    • 5Posts
    • 2Thanks
    ben0101
    First Floor Extension - Hollow Sounding Floor
    • #1
    • 6th Dec 18, 6:31 PM
    First Floor Extension - Hollow Sounding Floor 6th Dec 18 at 6:31 PM
    Good evening all We have recently purchased a 1930's semi with a 2-floor rear extension. The upstairs floors' floor sounds hollow (for want of a better term) in that when downstairs you can hear footsteps, talking and even number 1's when someone's using the en-suite. You also feel like you have to tip-toe when walking around upstairs as footsteps resonate badly. I've looked under the floor by removing a downlight from the downstairs ceiling and there is no insulation whatsoever in there - it's just a void approx. 6" high with joists supporting the first floor chipboard.

    Am I right in thinking I can just pack the 'inner' of the floor with insulation? How do they normally build extensions/new builds? as it seems very 'cheap' to me.

    Thankyou very much for reading Hopefully someone can help.
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 6th Dec 18, 6:55 PM
    • 26,129 Posts
    • 70,555 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 6th Dec 18, 6:55 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Dec 18, 6:55 PM
    That's how they build them, but yes, you can put batts of acoustic insulation between the joists to improve it.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • stuart45
    • By stuart45 6th Dec 18, 7:03 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 75 Thanks
    stuart45
    • #3
    • 6th Dec 18, 7:03 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Dec 18, 7:03 PM
    Better than the old method of sand pugging between the joists.
    • teneighty
    • By teneighty 6th Dec 18, 8:50 PM
    • 1,240 Posts
    • 895 Thanks
    teneighty
    • #4
    • 6th Dec 18, 8:50 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Dec 18, 8:50 PM
    That's how they build them, but yes, you can put batts of acoustic insulation between the joists to improve it.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    That's how they used to build them.

    It's been a Building Regulations requirement to have mineral fibre quilt in the floor void of upper floors within a single dwelling house, including extensions since 2003. Also internal partitions between bedrooms, bathrooms etc.

    If you are going to retro fit something you really need a fairly dense mineral fibre quilt, not just any old insulation. Hell of a job though trying to drag it through between the floor joists.
    • ben0101
    • By ben0101 6th Dec 18, 9:04 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    ben0101
    • #5
    • 6th Dec 18, 9:04 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Dec 18, 9:04 PM
    That's how they used to build them.

    It's been a Building Regulations requirement to have mineral fibre quilt in the floor void of upper floors within a single dwelling house, including extensions since 2003. Also internal partitions between bedrooms, bathrooms etc.

    If you are going to retro fit something you really need a fairly dense mineral fibre quilt, not just any old insulation. Hell of a job though trying to drag it through between the floor joists.
    Originally posted by teneighty
    Thank you for that. Looks like the floors' coming up then! When you say 'drag through the joists', what do you mean? Would you not just line 'between' each joist, sitting the quilt on the downstairs ceiling? (never done this before so please excuse my ignorance).
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