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  • FIRST POST
    • amieloustew
    • By amieloustew 21st Oct 19, 11:30 AM
    • 21Posts
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    amieloustew
    House Viewing -AWKWARD!!
    • #1
    • 21st Oct 19, 11:30 AM
    House Viewing -AWKWARD!! 21st Oct 19 at 11:30 AM
    Myself and my partner are first time buyers and have been looking for properties for the past couple of months. Budget £100K and hoping to put down between a 8-10% deposit.

    We had a viewing at a property last week and we really like it - great area, property needs next to no work (just personal decor changes), sellers move into new build property fairly soon.

    However, the viewing was really awkward. I was expecting to meet with an estate agent or a representative of the estate agent however it was the property owners showing us around and it felt really awkward. It felt like they were trying too hard and I felt I couldn't have a proper nosey around as they were in the house.

    My question is, can I arrange a second viewing and request that they aren't present? I assume they have chosen to deal with viewing themselves and oped not to involve a representative. Is this rude?

    Any advise is much appreciated.

    Amie
Page 2
    • Paully28
    • By Paully28 21st Oct 19, 12:09 PM
    • 70 Posts
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    Paully28
    I feel your pain. I once had a viewing where both owners were present, and although the wife was nice and showed us round, the husband couldn't have been more rude if he had tried. I subsequently found out they were not planning on being together after the sale, and I told the estate agent that I didn't want the house, partly as I didn't want to give any of my money to the husband :-)
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 21st Oct 19, 12:11 PM
    • 7,702 Posts
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    TBagpuss
    I have never NOT been shown around by the vendor! Surely it's standard unless the property is already empty??
    Originally posted by Crumble2018
    No, the standard is that the agents do it - it's normally part of their jobn. However, I think with cheap and online agetns it's become more common for vendors to do it themselcves.

    It is much more awkward and I always much prefer to have an agent do the viewing if I am looking to buy.

    I think it can be useful for the vendor to be there if you want a second viewing with a view to making an offer, as they have more knowledge about the property to answer any questions.

    OP, I think you would be dine to ask the agen whether they can arrnage another viewing with them rather than the vendors, but you can't force it!
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 21st Oct 19, 12:17 PM
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    AdrianC
    I've viewed properties shown around by the EA, and shown around by the owners.
    I've had viewings of my property with the EA showing them around, and showing them round myself.

    There is no "standard". Some vendors are odd people, some aren't. You aren't auditioning to be their friend, nor they yours.
    • Crumble2018
    • By Crumble2018 21st Oct 19, 12:24 PM
    • 190 Posts
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    Crumble2018
    No, the standard is that the agents do it - it's normally part of their jobn. However, I think with cheap and online agetns it's become more common for vendors to do it themselcves.
    Originally posted by TBagpuss

    I have both bought and rented, and not once have I ever been shown around by an agent, apart from where the property was empty. I have honestly never heard of anyone else I know being shown around by an agent either. When we sold our house, the agent never even mentioned it being an option that we didn't show vendors around ourselves.



    Maybe this is a regional thing as started above?
    • Halfie
    • By Halfie 21st Oct 19, 12:31 PM
    • 119 Posts
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    Halfie
    We showed round a couple of viewers when we were selling and actually, we showed round the people whose offer we are currently proceeding with (hoping to complete soon!). But it's not something we enjoyed doing and we've both worked in sales. A house is a personal thing and you put a lot of blood sweat and tears into making it a home. It's sometimes hard to be impartial as the vendor when showing people around I think because the things we love (and assume everyone else will) are perhaps not what we should have focussed on.

    Ask the EA for a second viewing and explain that you want to really check out the house so would prefer the vendors be out for an hour whilst you view. Our agents actually recommended we went out for viewings, but mostly we stayed in the garden as wanted to be on hand for questions the agents just wouldn't know. Good luck!
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 21st Oct 19, 12:34 PM
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    eddddy
    Is it a 'traditional' EA who gets paid on completion?

    If so, I'd be tempted to to explain the issue to the EA. An experienced EA will have come across this problem dozens of times, and might come up with a strategy to deal with it.


    FWIW, on one occasion an EA tactfully persuaded a seller to take his dog for a walk, whilst the EA took me round to check some things on a 3rd viewing - because things were getting 'difficult'.
    • scottishblondie
    • By scottishblondie 21st Oct 19, 12:47 PM
    • 2,133 Posts
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    scottishblondie
    From previous discussions here it seems to a large extent to be a regional thing - it's certainly the norm in Scotland for owner-occupiers to do viewings (unless it's a time they can't manage), and would be downright weird for a buyer to ask for anything else. Think the OP just needs to be brave enough to nose around as they wish. If of course the sellers are actually preventing them from doing so, beware!
    Originally posted by davidmcn
    I was going to say this - all of the EAs we had round charged extra for them to do the viewings, and all the houses we viewed were shown by the owners. Personally, I think it's better to be shown by the owner anyway as they can answer any questions. When I showed folk round I would take them through the downstairs, then the upstairs and then leave them up there to nosy round and make their way down.
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 21st Oct 19, 12:49 PM
    • 12,556 Posts
    • 17,229 Thanks
    hazyjo
    I'd prob say a good 80% of viewings I've had have been by the owner, and I've prob shown 90-odd% of buyers round my property.


    You mentioned wardrobes above - I'd save that for a second viewing (unless only planning on doing one viewing). Head off after, have a good think about if it's one you would consider buying, then go back for a more thorough look round. I'd also check things like water pressure, flush all loos, open windows, check out fitted furniture (ignore non-fitted! I can't tell you the amount of people who opened non-fitted furniture which really winds me up lol!) and look for any water marks/leaks, etc.
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    • ACG
    • By ACG 21st Oct 19, 12:54 PM
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    ACG
    Haha, I have been on both sides of this as a buyer and seller.
    As a buyer, you are thinking just give me 5 minutes to take a look in peace I cant look and talk.
    As a seller you are thinking I just have to stand in a different room and it is really awkward.

    It is what it is, just ask the question and obviously explain why, they will either take exception or fully understand. You would like to think they will understand and if nothing else, learn from it for future viewings.
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    • oozle1989
    • By oozle1989 21st Oct 19, 12:58 PM
    • 409 Posts
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    oozle1989
    I may try to go back with my mum or my partners mum and from the outset say we would like to have a nosey alone.
    Originally posted by amieloustew
    This is a good idea if you're younger and maybe a bit lacking in confidence. If not just having a second opinion from someone who is not emotionally attached to the house is always beneficial. They might spot things that you aren't seeing.

    We were all first time buyers once. I didn't have a clue what to look out for or ask when viewing. This forum is a great place for advice on things like that
    • pinkteapot
    • By pinkteapot 21st Oct 19, 12:59 PM
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    pinkteapot
    No, the standard is that the agents do it - it's normally part of their jobn. However, I think with cheap and online agetns it's become more common for vendors to do it themselcves.
    Originally posted by TBagpuss
    I've moved a handful of times over the last 15 years and I've always been shown round by vendors, and showed buyers round myself. And all purchases/sales have been through high street EAs.

    When I do viewings I show the buyers round the house, then let them have a second wander round by themselves. That's the only awkward part because you end up sat on the sofa or at the dining table pretending to read a magazine.

    I tell a lie actually - we viewed one house a few years ago where the EA did the viewing. It was completely useless as they didn't know anything about the house!
    • comeandgo
    • By comeandgo 21st Oct 19, 1:02 PM
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    comeandgo
    At next visit you should say to the owners that you would like to look at the fitted wardrobe, open drawers, open windows. Then the owners can accompany you. This is for your own " protection" as you would not like to be accused of taking something or even be under suspicion if something goes missing.
    • borkid
    • By borkid 21st Oct 19, 1:03 PM
    • 2,235 Posts
    • 4,765 Thanks
    borkid
    Thanks for your advise, I think I will arrange a second viewing and take my mum or my partners mum as it might make them feel more comfortable. Maybe the age difference threw them.
    Originally posted by amieloustew
    It's not about making the vendors feel more comfortable. Your mu, probably lived in a couple of houses and will be able to see things you might miss. Your mum would possibly find it easier to ask questions about the area/ neighbours etc than you might. Also I haven't had one house buy where I've not thought 'am I doing the right thing' at some point in the process your mum going could give you reassurance.
    • pinkteapot
    • By pinkteapot 21st Oct 19, 1:05 PM
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    pinkteapot
    Just to add - I've never opened cupboards on a viewing without asking fast. Definitely ask first if you're talking about someone's bedroom wardrobes!
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 21st Oct 19, 1:12 PM
    • 7,702 Posts
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    TBagpuss
    I have both bought and rented, and not once have I ever been shown around by an agent, apart from where the property was empty. I have honestly never heard of anyone else I know being shown around by an agent either. When we sold our house, the agent never even mentioned it being an option that we didn't show vendors around ourselves.



    Maybe this is a regional thing as started above?
    Originally posted by Crumble2018
    Could be. I've bought and sold in the Greater Manchester area and in the South West - agetns showing buyers round has ben the norm and on the odd ocassions when it was the seller the agetns alsways explined this when they booked in the appointment and check that was OK.

    I did have one viewing where I was due to view the house with the agent - I turned up, the agent didn't, and hadn't told the sellers about the appointment. . . The house was no good for me but the seller and I had a nice chat about how crap the agent was, and I let them know that I had had a lot of trouble getting hold of them to book the appointment, as well. I noticed that they changed agents a week later, which I suspect was not a coincidence!

    On another, the agent was showing me round but the seller was there - the seller kept pointing out all the defects to me. Again, I knew almost immediately it wasn'tthe hosue for me (neded a lot of work, which I wasn't looking for) so it was very funny watching the agent trying desperately to get the seller to shut upabout all the things that were wrong with the house!
    • flea72
    • By flea72 21st Oct 19, 1:24 PM
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    flea72
    I wanted to look through fitted wardrobes and I know now I should have just asked. Hopefully the confidence will come the more viewings I attend.
    Originally posted by amieloustew
    I would hate someone nosing through my wardrobe. Maybe start the conversation with them in the room with ‘what layout is inside’ if they offered to show me, fine, but if they described it, i wouldnt press, or take a peek when unaccompanied. Its a wardrobe, would the internal layout really put you off buying the house?

    Quite often when selling a house, you get viewing requests at short notice, i have often had to hide dirty laundry or washing up in a cupboard out of sight as i havent had time for a full tidy up.

    Also, as already said, valuables get put out of sight. If i wanted you to see all my electricals, jewellery and bank cards id have left them on display. How do i know you arent casing my house. I accompany people on all viewings and never leave them alone. I just stand back and let them look around. What else is there to see? The walls are standing, the windows open and close, everything else can be checked at survey, if you willing to pay for something more than a driveby.
    • CentiaRoyal
    • By CentiaRoyal 21st Oct 19, 1:47 PM
    • 22 Posts
    • 28 Thanks
    CentiaRoyal
    If they are there again, just remember to be courteous. Just don't go round slagging off their decor ("ugh, what horrible curtains" etc etc)!! If you did that to me I would be less inclined to sell to you! (I know I know, biting off nose to spite my face)
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 21st Oct 19, 2:07 PM
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    davidmcn
    It's a wardrobe, would the internal layout really put you off buying the house?
    Originally posted by flea72
    Not so much the internal layout, but you might want to check how deep it is, what the condition of the walls is like, whether it's full of mould, etc.
    • welwynrose
    • By welwynrose 21st Oct 19, 2:20 PM
    • 65 Posts
    • 51 Thanks
    welwynrose
    We were never at home when we were selling our house we always let the EA do the viewings, when we were looking to buy it was split 50/50 on owners doing viewings against EA doing the viewing we much preferred the EA doing the viewing
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 21st Oct 19, 2:25 PM
    • 29,954 Posts
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    Davesnave
    I just stand back and let them look around. What else is there to see? The walls are standing, the windows open and close, everything else can be checked at survey, if you willing to pay for something more than a driveby.
    Originally posted by flea72
    Oh dear, you wouldn't like us; we do our own surveys!

    But don't worry, we don't care if the bog flush doesn't work too well, or minor things like that; every house has a few of those. I don't think I've ever looked into a wardrobe or drawer. After all, a clapped-out kitchen is still obvious, even if some of the drawers function OK.

    We're only interested in the big things, so we'll need to go into the loft and have the drain covers up etc. Yes we have a ladder, and a spade to look at the garden soil too, though it's hardly ever been used. Here, a passing mole saved us the bother and helped sell the house to us.

    None of that on a first viewing, of course. Third is more appropriate.
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