Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • cg212
    • By cg212 21st Oct 19, 7:50 AM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    cg212
    Purchased house and found out next door is a children’s home
    • #1
    • 21st Oct 19, 7:50 AM
    Purchased house and found out next door is a children’s home 21st Oct 19 at 7:50 AM
    Hi, I am posting to see if anybody can share some advice on the following matter.

    I have recently purchased a house (3 weeks ago) and we have had a few issues with noise (arguing and loud music mainly). However, upon asking the neighbours to turn the music down on a couple of occasions, we learnt that next door is children’s support accommodation for 16-18 year olds. They have adults which work in shifts to go in there to look after them. However, had we known this prior to now, we wouldn’t have purchased the house.

    Should the sellers have been legally obliged to tell us? Should it have been discovered when the solicitor carried out our searches.

    Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
Page 1
    • Browntoa
    • By Browntoa 21st Oct 19, 8:00 AM
    • 35,771 Posts
    • 41,945 Thanks
    Browntoa
    • #2
    • 21st Oct 19, 8:00 AM
    • #2
    • 21st Oct 19, 8:00 AM
    Only required to notify you if they is an ongoing dispute with the neighbours. If you can prove that they had already been in dispute you could have grounds to take it further but it's likely to be expensive to do so.

    I've always gone and sat outside any property I'm thinking of buying various times of day and night to listen out for noise etc
    I'm the Board Guide of the Referrers ,Telephones, Pensions , Shop Don't drop ,over 50's , Boost your income and Discount Code boards which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum runnning smoothly .However, please remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an inappropriate or illegal post please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 21st Oct 19, 8:16 AM
    • 13,812 Posts
    • 15,965 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #3
    • 21st Oct 19, 8:16 AM
    • #3
    • 21st Oct 19, 8:16 AM
    Should the sellers have been legally obliged to tell us?
    Originally posted by cg212
    No.
    Should it have been discovered when the solicitor carried out our searches.
    No.

    It should have been discovered by your own research about what the area was like. You may have found clues by looking at eg the planning history of next door.

    ETA - in fact, just Googling the address of a children's home I know of produces a load of results with inspection reports etc - even the official Royal Mail address includes "childrens home".
    Last edited by davidmcn; 21-10-2019 at 9:59 AM.
    • pinkshoes
    • By pinkshoes 21st Oct 19, 8:18 AM
    • 16,765 Posts
    • 23,255 Thanks
    pinkshoes
    • #4
    • 21st Oct 19, 8:18 AM
    • #4
    • 21st Oct 19, 8:18 AM
    Unless there has been a formal dispute about noise then the vendor had no obligation to declare anything.

    It was up to you to visit the property at different times of day/night and knock on the door and visit the neighbours. Did you do this? (I’m thinking not...).

    Personally I have never bought a house without sussing out the neighbours.

    Other than improving the insulation and asking them nicely to keep the noise down, there is not a lot you can do.
    Should've = Should HAVE (not 'of')
    Would've = Would HAVE (not 'of')

    No, I am not perfect, but yes I do judge people on their use of basic English language. If you didn't know the above, then learn it! (If English is your second language, then you are forgiven!)
    • walwyn1978
    • By walwyn1978 21st Oct 19, 8:37 AM
    • 673 Posts
    • 674 Thanks
    walwyn1978
    • #5
    • 21st Oct 19, 8:37 AM
    • #5
    • 21st Oct 19, 8:37 AM
    Assuming it’s a shared wall, I’d look to invest in better insulation.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 21st Oct 19, 9:25 AM
    • 29,944 Posts
    • 103,229 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #6
    • 21st Oct 19, 9:25 AM
    • #6
    • 21st Oct 19, 9:25 AM
    Assuming it’s a shared wall, I’d look to invest in better insulation.
    Originally posted by walwyn1978
    That sort of investment is risky.

    If next door is support accommodation, this is likely to be a larger house, but installing extra walling loses floor space and it may be ineffectual due to noise transmitted through other parts of the structure. Only a specialist could be sure of the measures required; it's beyond the scope of general builders.

    Besides, noise will probably emanate from open windows and outdoor sources in the summer months.

    Probably the best initial approach, and the cheapest, would be to make the support workers aware of noise issues every time significant events happen. You should also keep a diary of these and maybe make recordings too. The home will have permission to operate, but like everyone else, they have no right to cause other residents regular annoyance. They won't want investigations from Environmental Health.

    As to who's responsible for your purchase of a property in this situation, it's you.
    We have removed your signature - please contact the forum team if you are not sure why - Forum Team.

    Sorry! (Warned for promoting The Warning! )
    • Brock_and_Roll
    • By Brock_and_Roll 21st Oct 19, 9:51 AM
    • 1,012 Posts
    • 1,020 Thanks
    Brock_and_Roll
    • #7
    • 21st Oct 19, 9:51 AM
    • #7
    • 21st Oct 19, 9:51 AM
    Whatever you do, don't get in a formal dispute with next door....otherwise you will be forced to disclose it when you sell!
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 21st Oct 19, 10:13 AM
    • 29,944 Posts
    • 103,229 Thanks
    Davesnave
    • #8
    • 21st Oct 19, 10:13 AM
    • #8
    • 21st Oct 19, 10:13 AM
    Whatever you do, don't get in a formal dispute with next door....otherwise you will be forced to disclose it when you sell!
    Originally posted by Brock_and_Roll
    True, but if that's what not to do, then what's the appropriate response, bearing in mind the OP has just purchased?

    The 'wait and see' response has merit if the OP thinks they might move, rather than endure the situation, but none of us knows exactly how bad it is. The residents next door will vary over time too.

    The OP won't be going anywhere for a year or two without raising suspicions, so a measured response initially is sensible. Advising support workers of excessive noise isn't, in itself, a dispute.

    Also bear in mind that the TA6 doesn't just ask about disputes; it also mentions known situations which would be likely to cause disputes.
    We have removed your signature - please contact the forum team if you are not sure why - Forum Team.

    Sorry! (Warned for promoting The Warning! )
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 21st Oct 19, 10:27 AM
    • 10,365 Posts
    • 12,540 Thanks
    Comms69
    • #9
    • 21st Oct 19, 10:27 AM
    • #9
    • 21st Oct 19, 10:27 AM
    To be clear, whether formal or not, all disputes should be disclosed. It's just not very easy to prove informal disputes.
    • Brock_and_Roll
    • By Brock_and_Roll 21st Oct 19, 10:43 AM
    • 1,012 Posts
    • 1,020 Thanks
    Brock_and_Roll
    Assuming the childrens home is fully licenced etc, there is nothing the OP can do other than keeping on friendly terms with his new neighbours.

    Living next to teenagers you are going to get occasional shouting matches, a bit of drum & bass and door slamming regardless of whether a childrens home or not!
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 21st Oct 19, 10:52 AM
    • 2,719 Posts
    • 1,013 Thanks
    sevenhills
    However, had we known this prior to now, we wouldn’t have purchased the house.
    Originally posted by cg212

    Its easy to say that in hindsight. If you had known about it being a care home after spending money on searches and solicitors fees, would you have gone ahead?

    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 21st Oct 19, 11:02 AM
    • 12,544 Posts
    • 17,207 Thanks
    hazyjo
    Is there absolutely no signage outside it at all? Nothing?


    Did you ask the vendors 'what are the neighbours like?' or any other questions about them? Even if you didn't knock on doors, you may at least have some sort of comeback if the sellers actually lied about who was there.
    2019 wins: Bottle of Prosecco; Popcorn Shed popcorn; Moisturising 'M&S Time Capsules'; Case of Boost Sport + Ł30 Just Eat voucher; Battle Proms tickets and hotel; under-eye serum...
    • gingerdad
    • By gingerdad 21st Oct 19, 11:19 AM
    • 1,842 Posts
    • 1,423 Thanks
    gingerdad
    All I can ask is how much research did you do before buying - cause I can tell you all the planning applications when purchased, any businesses registered to addresses, any company directors, the CQC rating of a care home nearby..... I don't understand how it seems you didn't even google the postcode - cause that would have brought up all sorts.

    But as other posters have said the previous owners only needed to disclose if there was a dispute, which if you have one you'll need to disclose going forward.

    good luck
    The futures bright the future is Ginger
    • G_M
    • By G_M 21st Oct 19, 12:17 PM
    • 50,540 Posts
    • 63,142 Thanks
    G_M
    So what happened when you knocked on the neighbours' door before making your final decision? Seem unlikely there was noone in. And if so, surely you tried more than once?

    What about he neighbours the other side? Did they not mention it?

    I know this is not helpful now, but for the benefit of other buyers reading this, always check with the neighbours!

    * if they slam the door in your face, you've learned a huge lesson
    * if they mention the sellers have had constant roof problems, that's really useful
    * if they invite you in and tell you all about the street community spirit, offer you cake and tea and quiz you about your jobs/family/etc - well you might consider that a plus or a minus, but either way it's useful!


    You're not just buying a house - you're buying a life in a street/area.
    • phill99
    • By phill99 21st Oct 19, 1:58 PM
    • 8,792 Posts
    • 8,060 Thanks
    phill99
    Another purchaser failing to do basic due diligence and then looking to blame someone else.
    Eat vegetables and fear no creditors, rather than eat duck and hide.
    • couriervanman
    • By couriervanman 21st Oct 19, 2:04 PM
    • 746 Posts
    • 1,374 Thanks
    couriervanman
    Hi, I am posting to see if anybody can share some advice on the following matter.

    I have recently purchased a house (3 weeks ago) and we have had a few issues with noise (arguing and loud music mainly). However, upon asking the neighbours to turn the music down on a couple of occasions, we learnt that next door is children’s support accommodation for 16-18 year olds. They have adults which work in shifts to go in there to look after them. However, had we known this prior to now, we wouldn’t have purchased the house.

    Should the sellers have been legally obliged to tell us? Should it have been discovered when the solicitor carried out our searches.

    Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Originally posted by cg212
    OP.......I think the blame firmly stops with you,i cant believe you didn't have a nose around before you bought
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 21st Oct 19, 2:19 PM
    • 2,418 Posts
    • 2,971 Thanks
    need an answer
    To a point I do sympathise with the OP, Yes perhaps you should have knocked on a few doors before you bought or spoke to neighbours,but not everybody does do that.

    ...and no there doesn't even need to be any signage outside that could alert you either.

    I'm a LL and have 2 properties within a complex where recently a home for independent living young adults with some issues have recently rented a property.....its been challenging for everyone to say the least!

    They moved in around a year ago and since then it has been a what seems like an uphill struggle for all the nearby residents to live in harmony with these young adults...yes they are to some extent supervised during the day but come clocking off time the place can be so easily transformed and often the police are called to mediate.

    From memory we are now on about the 5th set of tenants and touch wood there have been no problems for several weeks.

    OP I would suggest you do try and find out what the set up with the home is,whether it is owned by a business or just on a long term rental.
    Hard as it may seem try and speak with those in charge and take it further up the line if you have to.
    Log your concerns and if appropriate try and speak to other neighbours to see if they are disturbed by the noise or whatever and collectively you may be able to get some assurances that the unsociable instances are stopped

    Collectively myself and some other residents spoke with the charity who were living near us,and whilst its not resolved by any means there have been clear objectives and dare I say rules agreed that hopefully should allow everyone to be a little more understanding of eachother.

    These types of accommodations are becoming more frequently found in the community.I actually lived next door to one for many years with no problems whatsoever...three young guys who were wonderful. It all boils down to the individual residents.
    Last edited by need an answer; 21-10-2019 at 4:15 PM.
    in S 60 T 19 F 52
    out S 59 T 17 F 69

    2017 -32 2018 -33 2019
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 21st Oct 19, 2:25 PM
    • 13,812 Posts
    • 15,965 Thanks
    davidmcn
    Living next to teenagers you are going to get occasional shouting matches, a bit of drum & bass and door slamming regardless of whether a childrens home or not!
    Originally posted by Brock_and_Roll
    Indeed, though with a normal household you'd at least be confident that the teens will at some point mature and/or move out - whereas with a children's home it's a "household" which mostly comprises teens, and always will.
    • couriervanman
    • By couriervanman 21st Oct 19, 3:40 PM
    • 746 Posts
    • 1,374 Thanks
    couriervanman
    To a point I do sympathise with the OP, Yes perhaps you should have knocked on a few doors before you bought or spoke to neighbours,but not everybody does do that.

    ...and no there doesn't even need to be any signage outside that could alert you either.

    I'm a LL and have 2 properties within a complex where recently a home for independent living young adults with some issues have recently rented a property.....its been challenging for everyone to say the least!

    They moved in around a year ago and since then it has been a what seems like an uphill struggle for all the nearby residents to live in harmony with these young adults...yes they are to some extent supervised during the day but come clocking off time the place can be so easily transformed and often the police are called to mediate.

    From memory we are now on about the 5th set of tenants and touch wood there have been no problems for several weeks.

    OP I would suggest you do try and find out what the set up with the home is,whether it is owned by a business or just on a long term rental.
    Hard as it may seem try and speak with those in charge and take it further up the line if you have to.

    Collectively myself and some other residents spoke with the charity who were living near us,and whilst its not resolved by any means there have been clear objectives and dare I say rules agreed that hopefully should allow everyone to be a little more understanding of eachother.
    Originally posted by need an answer
    "To a point I do sympathise with the OP, Yes perhaps you should have knocked on a few doors before you bought or spoke to neighbours,but not everybody does do that."


    If I'm spending Ł100k-Ł500k on a house.....I'd want to know the ins and out of a fart
    • need an answer
    • By need an answer 21st Oct 19, 3:51 PM
    • 2,418 Posts
    • 2,971 Thanks
    need an answer
    "To a point I do sympathise with the OP, Yes perhaps you should have knocked on a few doors before you bought or spoke to neighbours,but not everybody does do that."


    If I'm spending Ł100k-Ł500k on a house.....I'd want to know the ins and out of a fart
    Originally posted by couriervanman
    of course you do...but not everyone is quite as forward....

    I took very reasonable steps when purchasing both the properties that became affected by unsociable near neighbours...

    Sometimes the problem arrives after you purchase in the form of them just signing a rental agreement as I discovered...and sometimes the problem can be very well managed in daylight hours so those viewing and purchasing the property next door may not be aware.

    If youre quite so forensic with your "fart" then maybe even buying with anything nearby might be considered risky.....in as much as you'd probably be better off with your own company in a detached away from anyone

    Personally I'm not that keen when theres a large van on the drive...but I guess everyones different and has there own set of wants and compromises.
    Last edited by need an answer; 21-10-2019 at 3:56 PM.
    in S 60 T 19 F 52
    out S 59 T 17 F 69

    2017 -32 2018 -33 2019
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

4,201Posts Today

9,245Users online

Martin's Twitter