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  • FIRST POST
    • Pete_J75
    • By Pete_J75 11th Sep 19, 11:52 AM
    • 8Posts
    • 4Thanks
    Pete_J75
    2nd job, will my employer find out?
    • #1
    • 11th Sep 19, 11:52 AM
    2nd job, will my employer find out? 11th Sep 19 at 11:52 AM
    I work part-time (20 hrs/ week) in a professional role and am considering taking a second job partly for the money but also to try a new challenge and do something different.

    I have read my employment contract and as far as i can tell there is nothing stopping me from taking on a second job. However i would rather do this without my employer finding out as it may cause difficulties 'politically' as they may be concerned about my commitment to the company or worry about the jobs clashing.

    If i take on a second job I would use my NI number and this could affect my tax status. Could not telling my original employer cause any problems re HMRC? Any advice?
Page 1
    • Blatchford
    • By Blatchford 11th Sep 19, 1:01 PM
    • 69 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    Blatchford
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 19, 1:01 PM
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 19, 1:01 PM
    Unlikely. But that doesn't mean they won't find out.
    • General Grant
    • By General Grant 11th Sep 19, 5:12 PM
    • 1,112 Posts
    • 1,050 Thanks
    General Grant
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 19, 5:12 PM
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 19, 5:12 PM
    I work part-time (20 hrs/ week) in a professional role and am considering taking a second job partly for the money but also to try a new challenge and do something different.

    I have read my employment contract and as far as i can tell there is nothing stopping me from taking on a second job. However i would rather do this without my employer finding out as it may cause difficulties 'politically' as they may be concerned about my commitment to the company or worry about the jobs clashing.

    If i take on a second job I would use my NI number and this could affect my tax status. Could not telling my original employer cause any problems re HMRC? Any advice?
    Originally posted by Pete_J75
    If you take a second job (and as you mention NI number) I guess this is PAYE. You would complete a new starter checklist with the new organisation and say you had other employment. The new employer would then deduct 20% tax from all your earnings, on the basis that your other employer will be giving you the benefit of your tax-free allowance. You will also have NI deducted but that is simply on the payment they make and has no bearing on what you pay through your current employer's payroll.

    HMRC would never tell your current employer that you had work elsewhere although they might ask them to apply a different tax code (which could be for all sorts of reasons).

    However, will you not need to provide a reference from your current employer?
    • Dakta
    • By Dakta 12th Sep 19, 9:44 AM
    • 21 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Dakta
    • #4
    • 12th Sep 19, 9:44 AM
    • #4
    • 12th Sep 19, 9:44 AM
    I was in a similar position in a role I left last year, I liked my job, but didn't quite earn enough so I became self employed doing part time work freelance.

    It was a bit of a 50/50 thing, my direct manager didn't care (even helped me paint my office as we expanded), but HR knew something wasn't right because I didn't seem to 'struggle enough financially' (yes she was like that, I once got offered a pay rise for performance by the MD and she tried to veto it) so she had it in for me from day 1, we ran circle around her for months whilst she tried to sniff out what exactly went on between shifts, in the end the place got too political as she turned into investigating every little mistake i made for potential of disciplinary action so despite having a good relationship with my direct manager I brought it to an end and quit as my freelance work was overtaking my main job.

    There are issues, got nothing to do with company and attitudes but fatigue is something i'd warn people to watch depending hours you do when balancing two incomes.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 12th Sep 19, 10:04 AM
    • 7,105 Posts
    • 5,607 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #5
    • 12th Sep 19, 10:04 AM
    • #5
    • 12th Sep 19, 10:04 AM
    However i would rather do this without my employer finding out
    Originally posted by Pete_J75
    You have a duty of fidelity to your employer, if the workplace culture causes concern then tread carefully. Some individuals can't contain themselves by informing management. Sh!t finds a way.
    Donít be a canít, be a can.
    • Yugen Bonsai
    • By Yugen Bonsai 14th Sep 19, 11:10 PM
    • 10 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Yugen Bonsai
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 19, 11:10 PM
    • #6
    • 14th Sep 19, 11:10 PM
    it depends on the type of job as well. If the second job is customer facing or dealing with lots of clients, it's likely someone may recognise you or know mutual people from your current workplace. The more exposure, the more likely they'll find out. Legally they can't stop you if it's not in your contract but as you said, they might change their attitude towards you. You've got to gauge the work environment to see if it would be a problem.
    • prowla
    • By prowla 15th Sep 19, 6:32 AM
    • 10,572 Posts
    • 9,324 Thanks
    prowla
    • #7
    • 15th Sep 19, 6:32 AM
    • #7
    • 15th Sep 19, 6:32 AM
    If the employer is paying for 20 hours of your time, then what you do outside of that is not under their control, unless:
    1. You have an exclusivity clause in your contract (I can't see that working for a part-time job).
    2. You have a "no working for competitors" clause, which may be reasonable, depending on the role.
    3. It impacts you ability to do their work.
    Legally, as far as employment goes, you can have several jobs at the same time.
    • Brynsam
    • By Brynsam 15th Sep 19, 1:16 PM
    • 2,201 Posts
    • 1,658 Thanks
    Brynsam
    • #8
    • 15th Sep 19, 1:16 PM
    • #8
    • 15th Sep 19, 1:16 PM
    If i take on a second job I would use my NI number and this could affect my tax status. Could not telling my original employer cause any problems re HMRC? Any advice?
    Originally posted by Pete_J75
    If you're an employee you have no option but to give your NI number to your employer. It's not your NI number that affects your tax status, it's your earnings. You can ask HMRC to split your personal allowance between the two jobs, or (which seems to fit the bill here) have the whole PA applied to your current job, in which case you will be taxed on your whole earnings from the second job. Overall tax impact on you the same, tax code with your current job almost certainly unaltered.
    • General Grant
    • By General Grant 15th Sep 19, 2:05 PM
    • 1,112 Posts
    • 1,050 Thanks
    General Grant
    • #9
    • 15th Sep 19, 2:05 PM
    • #9
    • 15th Sep 19, 2:05 PM
    If you're an employee you have no option but to give your NI number to your employer. It's not your NI number that affects your tax status, it's your earnings. You can ask HMRC to split your personal allowance between the two jobs, or (which seems to fit the bill here) have the whole PA applied to your current job, in which case you will be taxed on your whole earnings from the second job. Overall tax impact on you the same, tax code with your current job almost certainly unaltered.
    Originally posted by Brynsam
    Just to clarify the "overall" note about the tax code with current employer - it would change if the code is split.
    The total tax due in the year might not be fully collected and will be subject to adjustment (extra payment or revision to future tax code) but only if some of the extra earning would be subject to 40% tax.
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