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  • FIRST POST
    • andyward82
    • By andyward82 11th Sep 19, 7:47 AM
    • 94Posts
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    andyward82
    Moving into a New Build House then Making Alterations - NHBC
    • #1
    • 11th Sep 19, 7:47 AM
    Moving into a New Build House then Making Alterations - NHBC 11th Sep 19 at 7:47 AM
    Hello.
    I shall hopefully be moving into a new build house soon. The house is covered by NHBC for 10 years as standard.
    I have a standalone garage which backs onto my garden that I'd like to convert into an office and install bi-fold doors into.
    Can anyone out there advise me on the implications this would have on the NHBC certification of the house, etc. Will it invalidate the warranty? Would I need to get an 'exception' made? How do I go about making sure I keep the NHBC coverage?
    Thanks in advance
    Andy
Page 1
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 11th Sep 19, 8:03 AM
    • 6,414 Posts
    • 4,306 Thanks
    csgohan4
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 19, 8:03 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Sep 19, 8:03 AM
    Also make sure you have don't have covenant restriction's on your deeds or needing permission from the freeholder if applicable
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land/Estate Agents"
    • JMA74
    • By JMA74 11th Sep 19, 8:25 AM
    • 494 Posts
    • 350 Thanks
    JMA74
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 19, 8:25 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Sep 19, 8:25 AM
    I echo the above, check your covenants.

    A client bought a new build recently that said they weren't allowed to paint the walls within the first 2 years or it will invalidate the snagging cover
    If you start to do things outwith the covenant then it's likely any claims assessor will just say it happened because of your work.
    Nhbc aren't known to be happy to start paying out for stuff willingly
    I am a Mortgage Adviser

    You should note that this site doesn't check my status as a Mortgage Adviser, so you need to take my word for it. This signature is here as I follow MSE's Mortgage Adviser Code of Conduct. Any posts on here are for information and discussion purposes only and shouldn't be seen as financial advice.
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 11th Sep 19, 8:30 AM
    • 12,785 Posts
    • 14,484 Thanks
    davidmcn
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 19, 8:30 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Sep 19, 8:30 AM
    It's not going to generally invalidate your warranty, but obviously it only covers inherent faults in the original construction. As above, the more significant issue is getting any necessary consents.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 11th Sep 19, 9:07 AM
    • 24,130 Posts
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    AdrianC
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 19, 9:07 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Sep 19, 9:07 AM
    Is it leasehold...?
    • andyward82
    • By andyward82 11th Sep 19, 9:11 AM
    • 94 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    andyward82
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 19, 9:11 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Sep 19, 9:11 AM
    Is it leasehold...?
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    No, it's a detatched house. Freehold.
    • pattypan4
    • By pattypan4 11th Sep 19, 9:31 AM
    • 227 Posts
    • 871 Thanks
    pattypan4
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 19, 9:31 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Sep 19, 9:31 AM
    The big builders use a double garage as an office. I don`t see the difference
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 11th Sep 19, 12:30 PM
    • 24,130 Posts
    • 23,344 Thanks
    AdrianC
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 19, 12:30 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Sep 19, 12:30 PM
    No, it's a detatched house. Freehold.
    Originally posted by andyward82
    "Detached house" doesn't necessarily mean it isn't leasehold, especially new-build.
    • sal_III
    • By sal_III 11th Sep 19, 12:37 PM
    • 1,175 Posts
    • 1,145 Thanks
    sal_III
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 19, 12:37 PM
    • #9
    • 11th Sep 19, 12:37 PM
    "Detached house" doesn't necessarily mean it isn't leasehold, especially new-build.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    I thought Leasehold new build houses were banned already?

    That doesn't mean there is no service charge and/or covenants in place.

    NHBC warranty is structural, if you are not knocking down walls and merely changing the door and use of the garage I don't think it will invalidate the warranty.
    • andyward82
    • By andyward82 11th Sep 19, 12:46 PM
    • 94 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    andyward82
    I thought Leasehold new build houses were banned already?

    That doesn't mean there is no service charge and/or covenants in place.

    NHBC warranty is structural, if you are not knocking down walls and merely changing the door and use of the garage I don't think it will invalidate the warranty.
    Originally posted by sal_III
    It's definitely a freehold house.
    • Oxid8uk
    • By Oxid8uk 11th Sep 19, 12:50 PM
    • 181 Posts
    • 157 Thanks
    Oxid8uk
    The big builders use a double garage as an office. I don`t see the difference
    Originally posted by pattypan4
    But they are only using it temporarily as an office/marketing suite. Once the development is finished it must revert back to a garage so all planning conditions can be discharged.
    • Oxid8uk
    • By Oxid8uk 11th Sep 19, 12:53 PM
    • 181 Posts
    • 157 Thanks
    Oxid8uk
    As well as checking covenants etc. you also need to check that permitted development rights haven't been removed (which regularly are on new build developments). This may mean that you would have to apply for planning permission, and if converting the garage means that the number of parking spaces for the house falls below the required minimum then it is likely it will be refused.
    • andyward82
    • By andyward82 11th Sep 19, 12:55 PM
    • 94 Posts
    • 7 Thanks
    andyward82
    As well as checking covenants etc. you also need to check that permitted development rights haven't been removed (which regularly are on new build developments). This may mean that you would have to apply for planning permission, and if converting the garage means that the number of parking spaces for the house falls below the required minimum then it is likely it will be refused.
    Originally posted by Oxid8uk
    Cheers. Lots of stuff to consider there....!
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 11th Sep 19, 1:00 PM
    • 24,130 Posts
    • 23,344 Thanks
    AdrianC
    I thought Leasehold new build houses were banned already?
    Originally posted by sal_III
    As of the end of June, they "confirmed plans to abolish"... "And we will legislate to ensure that in the future save for the most exceptional circumstances all new house will be sold on a freehold basis."
    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/leasehold-axed-for-all-new-houses-in-move-to-place-fairness-at-heart-of-housing-market
    When that actually takes effect is a separate question.
    • ethank
    • By ethank 11th Sep 19, 6:54 PM
    • 2,017 Posts
    • 1,049 Thanks
    ethank
    You will probably need planning permission for this. Many sites are protected either by covenant or planning condition for a period of five years from making changes to the external views of the building.
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