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  • FIRST POST
    • DAvidWells
    • By DAvidWells 31st Jul 19, 10:44 AM
    • 2Posts
    • 1Thanks
    DAvidWells
    AMAZON age restricted
    • #1
    • 31st Jul 19, 10:44 AM
    AMAZON age restricted 31st Jul 19 at 10:44 AM
    I ordered vermouth from Amazon - it was delivered to my front door - a detached house with clear numbering and street address.

    I am 62 years of age, and look my age.

    To my surprise and disgust I was unconditionally told to provide physical evidence of my date of birth. Before my purchase could be handed over.

    I have received wine and whisky in earlier Amazon deliveries and only gave a signature for receipt. Supermarkets and their home deliveries use discretion in regard to a persons age. I have never been confronted with a request for physical evidence of my date of birth !
    I understand the reason for law in regard to alcohol available on Amazon.co.uk being age restricted. However, I have received no clear understanding of what Amazonsí policy is in this respect. One response from customer services refers to valid photo identification Ė this does not address my issue Ė and surely in my case a photo to confirm my age would be inappropriate/unnecessary. Amazons policy appears to be muddled
    Referring to a second message from Customer services - I donít recall giving permission for your carrier to contact me direct in regard to my issue. I do not wish to be contacted by or have any involvement with your carrier !
    Q. how does this comply with Data Protection Act ?
    Q. what is the clear Amazon policy for alcohol sales/deliveries ?
    UK does not have ID cards (compulsory in France since Nazi occupation in 1940), and many people would find it hard to provide physical evidence of their date of birth if they do not drive or have travelled abroad. A birth certificate isnít something I imagine readily to hand either.

    So my advice to all Amazon customers over 21 is do not purchase any alcohol beverage from Amazon, or Amazon Pantry itís supermarket arm. Else, suffer possible embarrassment/ harassment, and Ageism.

    Some may be flattered to be asked for evidence of age - at my age I am beyond such.

Page 3
    • Henry_Wood
    • By Henry_Wood 25th Sep 19, 6:02 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 33 Thanks
    Henry_Wood
    Im having this 'discussion' with Amazon at the moment.

    I do my grocery shopping every week online and have never once been required to prove my age to Tesco, ASDA or Sainsburys etc.

    Amazon have been a nightmare to deal with and simply couldnt care less. I dont blame the drivers in any way - Amazon policy is not their fault and customers shouldnt take their frustration out on the drivers.
    Originally posted by ClaireB182
    Hi, As I said in an earlier post I have been a customer with Amazon since 1999. I *used* to be a Premium customer with all that entailed and though I mainly used it for "next day delivery" I had bought and used the Fire TV apparatus, 2 x Kindle Fire tablets, and so far, 4 x different editions of Kindle e-book readers. I have used a few e-book reader systems/machines and I do consider that Amazon Kindle are the best for electronic book reading.

    *HOWEVER*, about a year ago I bought a watch wrist strap made by a very well known firm though the order was fulfilled by Amazon and there began my troubles. When the strap arrived it was not only the wrong colour, it was also the wrong size to fit the watch. On examining the package, it had obviously been a customer return and had then been re-labelled - the old label was still visible under the new one! *BUT* the wrong new label was affixed to the item, so I got the completely wrong product.

    Customer services - no joy. Absolutely no joy and I posted about my dissatisfaction about this using the customer review system. To my utter surprise, within a few hours I had a reply from the actual maker of the watchstrap inviting me to get in direct touch with them. I did this and this manufacturer solved my problem immediately by sending me the correct strap to fit my watch *and* they included a free extra strap too.

    Amazon UK meantime did not want to know about anything at all.

    Well, fair enough. Following that poor example of "customer relations", I immediately cancelled my many years long subscription to Amazon Premium. I never really missed the TV or music service as I did not use them much at all.
    I have also found out that not having a Premium "next day" delivery service available, I no longer make impulse buys like, "get it tomorrow". I also find that *MANY* items, which used to be "cheap as chips" on Amazon are now priced beyond belief on their site. (I'm talking some Deli items which I bought for years and have now gone through the roof.)

    All in all, Amazon is NOT what it was or used to be. The company seems to believe that they have "cornered the online shopping market" and can now do what they like. Do not believe it.

    Since cancelling my Premium subscription I still buy a few things from Amazon UK, simply adding stuff into my basket (if the price is right!) until the minimum buy is passed. I also save nearly £10 per month, or even £120 per year, which can pay for a few "next day deliveries" should I ever really need one.

    Thanks for listening.
    Last edited by Henry_Wood; 25-09-2019 at 6:10 PM.
    • Henry_Wood
    • By Henry_Wood 25th Sep 19, 6:25 PM
    • 25 Posts
    • 33 Thanks
    Henry_Wood
    Hi again Claire,
    I'm just re-reading your post and my original reply and I realise that my reply does not really help you at all.


    I honestly do not know what to recommend. For so many things in life Amazon is very, very handy, but as you say they are very draconian with their rules on age-related items. Once again in life, the baby is thrown out with the bathwater and the entirely innocent have to jump through hoops because of a few miscreants.


    As retailers and "big companies" will always wanting to be covering their posteriors, there is little hope for the little people vto challenge them.


    Nowadays, Claire, I am in the fortunate positions of being able to afford the many online supermarket alternatives to Amazon UK and I now deliberately avoid Amazon as much as possible.


    At the end of the day, Amazon UK prices, especially with regards to "groceries" etc are rising by leaps and bounds, so all I can really suggest is to try and buy locally online from your nearest supermarket offering delivery and try to forget what was once the "GREAT" Amazon experience. It is all now very shallow.


    Do take care, Claire. Best wishes.
    Henry
    (And I do hope there are no replies about "go out and do your shopping instead of online", for some people do not know of what they speak.)



    Im having this 'discussion' with Amazon at the moment.

    I am 43 and up until now have never once been asked for photo ID until a few months ago. The documents demanded by Amazon are a photo driving license or a passport (the other options aren't applicable to someone who was born in the UK and who has lived here all their life). I dont have either as I am now disabled. I therefore cant produce the documents for genuine reasons. As far as Amazon is concerned, thats now tough luck!

    Amazon is unable/unwilling to advise me why until a few weeks ago, I have not once been asked by an Amazon delivery driver to verify my age when delivering age related products. It is also unable/unwilling to explain why a 43 year old customer who clearly looks well above the age of 18 years old is being required to verify their age when there is no UK law requiring them to do so. UK law regarding the sale of alcohol, an age restricted product, is very clear. It is illegal to sell alcohol to anyone under 18 and retailers must verify the age of anyone who might be under 18. It is recommended that a retailer ask any customer who looks under 25 for ID to prove they are over 18.

    I do my grocery shopping every week online and have never once been required to prove my age to Tesco, ASDA or Sainsburys etc.

    Amazon have been a nightmare to deal with and simply couldnt care less. I dont blame the drivers in any way - Amazon policy is not their fault and customers shouldnt take their frustration out on the drivers.
    Originally posted by ClaireB182
    • basill
    • By basill 26th Sep 19, 9:23 AM
    • 1,222 Posts
    • 584 Thanks
    basill
    I sent a nice bottle of whisky to my nephew for his 18th birthday. It arrived the day before and he was alone in the house.
    The courier quite rightly refused to hand it over, the delivery was successful the next day. :-)

    B
    • Takmon
    • By Takmon 26th Sep 19, 12:51 PM
    • 979 Posts
    • 981 Thanks
    Takmon
    Hi, As I said in an earlier post I have been a customer with Amazon since 1999. I *used* to be a Premium customer with all that entailed and though I mainly used it for "next day delivery" I had bought and used the Fire TV apparatus, 2 x Kindle Fire tablets, and so far, 4 x different editions of Kindle e-book readers. I have used a few e-book reader systems/machines and I do consider that Amazon Kindle are the best for electronic book reading.

    *HOWEVER*, about a year ago I bought a watch wrist strap made by a very well known firm though the order was fulfilled by Amazon and there began my troubles. When the strap arrived it was not only the wrong colour, it was also the wrong size to fit the watch. On examining the package, it had obviously been a customer return and had then been re-labelled - the old label was still visible under the new one! *BUT* the wrong new label was affixed to the item, so I got the completely wrong product.

    Customer services - no joy. Absolutely no joy and I posted about my dissatisfaction about this using the customer review system. To my utter surprise, within a few hours I had a reply from the actual maker of the watchstrap inviting me to get in direct touch with them. I did this and this manufacturer solved my problem immediately by sending me the correct strap to fit my watch *and* they included a free extra strap too.

    Amazon UK meantime did not want to know about anything at all.
    Originally posted by Henry_Wood
    I'm quite surprised by this; in my experience Amazon have the best returns system of any online retailer i have used. I've had poor performing products and damaged products arrive and i have simply go on to the site and selected the return reason and they either send another one right away before i even sent the product back or give me a refund once it's posted and before they even receive it. This applies to both products supplied by Amazon and by third parties.

    I've never even had to contact customer services at all.

    Well, fair enough. Following that poor example of "customer relations", I immediately cancelled my many years long subscription to Amazon Premium. I never really missed the TV or music service as I did not use them much at all.
    I have also found out that not having a Premium "next day" delivery service available, I no longer make impulse buys like, "get it tomorrow". I also find that *MANY* items, which used to be "cheap as chips" on Amazon are now priced beyond belief on their site. (I'm talking some Deli items which I bought for years and have now gone through the roof.)

    All in all, Amazon is NOT what it was or used to be. The company seems to believe that they have "cornered the online shopping market" and can now do what they like. Do not believe it.

    Since cancelling my Premium subscription I still buy a few things from Amazon UK, simply adding stuff into my basket (if the price is right!) until the minimum buy is passed. I also save nearly £10 per month, or even £120 per year, which can pay for a few "next day deliveries" should I ever really need one.

    Thanks for listening.
    Originally posted by Henry_Wood
    Amazon do not offer anything called "Amazon Premium". They do offer Amazon Prime but that costs £7.99 a month or £79 a year so i'm not sure what your on about.
    • babb
    • By babb 1st Oct 19, 7:48 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    babb
    Does anyone have concerns about giving their DOB to someone (an unknown courier) who already has their name & DOB? Enough information for identity theft?
    • Mr_Singleton
    • By Mr_Singleton 1st Oct 19, 8:12 PM
    • 1,659 Posts
    • 2,583 Thanks
    Mr_Singleton
    Does anyone have concerns about giving their DOB to someone (an unknown courier) who already has their name & DOB? Enough information for identity theft?
    Originally posted by babb
    Donít forget they ALSO have your address!

    Best not shop online hey!
    • Korkyb
    • By Korkyb 2nd Oct 19, 12:57 AM
    • 355 Posts
    • 224 Thanks
    Korkyb
    I for one will be joining the ranks of you who will be buying our sherry from the supermarket from now on...


    Far, far easier to get in the car / bus, travel to said supermarket, find the items required, stand in a queue, make return journey than to go to all the trouble (and seconds wasted) to wap out I.D. & show the delivery driver.




    This policy makes perfect sense - think how easy it would be for spotty teenagers under 18 to order booze from Amazon & get it delivered to their Gran telling her that its something else.


    Some of the comments on here make me wonder if its just the younger generation that are snowflakes!
    • AaronDH
    • By AaronDH 5th Oct 19, 9:17 PM
    • 37 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    AaronDH
    I am an Amazon delivery driver... Perhaps this will help some to understand the process.


    Most Amazon deliveries are fulfilled by either Amazon Logistics, Royal Mail or DPD. They have complex mechanisms to decide which parcel is delivered by which mechanism. This month all of my Amazon deliveries have been DPD, last month most were RM.



    Where a delivery is fulfilled by Amazon Logistics it either goes to van drivers who are self-employed but arranged by local agencies or to self-employed people using their own cars (Amazon Flex). Amazon Logistics delivery partners use a mobile phone app which insists a date of birth is entered for age restricted deliveries.



    This is a new policy and drivers do indeed think it's daft. However Amazon employs algorithms to monitor, hire and fire drivers; any mistake will cost a driver their income source. Amazon routinely do test purchasing with numerous drivers having already received emails to say they've passed or been fired for failing! There is no appeals process and drivers can only email 'robots' who don't understand 'but he was clearly 63'. Since Amazon's drivers are all self-employed, there is no process to seek redress for dismissal etc.


    In summary I don't think it's fair to say they're being jobsworths. They will literally get fired without warning, without notice and without right of appeal for not doing it.


    I don't know how the process is implemented with DPD or RM so I assume this is why some are still seeing some inconsistencies. I also expect some drivers are willing to employ common sense and input a DOB without seeing ID; this will probably bite them though if the person happens to be a test purchaser.


    Simple answer here - as others have said - if you don't like having to show ID, buy from a shop. Perhaps Amazon will re-think if it affects sales.
    • Uitlander
    • By Uitlander 1st Dec 19, 8:14 AM
    • 15 Posts
    • 3 Thanks
    Uitlander
    I had my first run in with Amazon age verification this weekend after ordering a nice bottle of gin as a black Friday deal. The first attempt at delivery went to my workplace (my usual delivery address) where Reception refused the package. Apparently there has been a kerfuffle about Amazon's Age verification and it has been declared an unaccepatble invasion of our reception staff's privacy (I have quite a lot of sympathy for that). HR & compliance have implemented a blanket ban on receiving any items that require age verification ... they just hadn't got around to telling the staff yet. The email doing that went out on Friday afternoon when I asked whether they were going to let people know.

    I arranged for it to be redelivered to my home address yesterday. Originally Amazon showed it arriving in the morning, then changed that to the afternoon, and finally the evening. It never arrived. So my order has now been cancelled and I've complained to Amazon about my wasted day off waiting in for the driver who never came. But it looks like I will not be ordering any alcohol from them again due to the delivery problem - because of they age verification stuff I cannot get it sent to an Amazon locker instead.
    • London50
    • By London50 1st Dec 19, 3:56 PM
    • 1,721 Posts
    • 1,694 Thanks
    London50
    Reading this thread reminded me of a delivery I had a just over a month ago. below is the item I ordered and had delivered but only after I showed my bus pass,even the delivery driver could not understand why ID was required.
    Perhaps any of the posters on here could answer it I would be very happy.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B074J82JF7/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    • molerat
    • By molerat 1st Dec 19, 4:03 PM
    • 21,644 Posts
    • 15,870 Thanks
    molerat
    Reading this thread reminded me of a delivery I had a just over a month ago. below is the item I ordered and had delivered but only after I showed my bus pass,even the delivery driver could not understand why ID was required.
    Perhaps any of the posters on here could answer it I would be very happy.

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B074J82JF7/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    Originally posted by London50
    Well, they do have sharp edges and you could do someone a severe injury screwing one into them. But then books could be a bit risky on that score, the number of times I have cut myself on paper !
    https://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/give-support/donate-now/
    • kangoora
    • By kangoora 1st Dec 19, 4:26 PM
    • 891 Posts
    • 853 Thanks
    kangoora
    My mum got asked her age in Tesco the other week when buying a bottle of Baileys.

    She's 88 - but does look young for her age
    • Mrs_Ryan
    • By Mrs_Ryan 2nd Dec 19, 1:29 AM
    • 11,091 Posts
    • 20,995 Thanks
    Mrs_Ryan
    I bought 2 bottles of Irish whiskey from Amazon but didn’t have to show ID- it was delivered by Royal Mail though.
    Open University 2:1 Graduate 2017; MA at DMU complete 2018- MERIT!! Round 2 OU 2018- BSc Combined STEM (Sports Psychology) Year 1 PASS! E117 &DE100. Year 2- K220 and E235.
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    Strictly 2019- TEAM RAMSEY!
    Elle
    • Kingsd316
    • By Kingsd316 2nd Dec 19, 9:16 AM
    • 1,362 Posts
    • 614 Thanks
    Kingsd316
    I often have alcohol in my pantry order and have never been asked for ID and the courier is happy to leave it in my safe place behind the bins
    • Technogran
    • By Technogran 2nd Dec 19, 11:07 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Technogran
    71 year old asked for date of birth?
    If the courier handed it over to someone under age he would be liable to prosecution.

    Asking for ID covers him that you are the person who ordered the goods claiming to be over 18 and not that person's mother/gran/ friend etc
    Originally posted by sheramber
    Yes, but no shop in the world would ask a 71 year old woman for proof of her age before they would sell her alcohol or any other age restricted item!
    • Technogran
    • By Technogran 2nd Dec 19, 11:26 PM
    • 7 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Technogran
    Amazon's policy on this issue is unnecessary
    The courier is doing what he has been instructed to do. may lose his job if he doesn't do it. Donlt shoot the messenger.

    Direct your disgust to Amazon and see what they say
    Originally posted by sheramber
    Oh, I did write to Amazon but they just sent a reply with a link to their Privacy Notice, which was no help at all. Furthermore, there was no way to reply to their stock reply!

    My point is that anyone with even an ounce of sense can clearly tell that I am an elderly woman (71 years old) and should NOT have to ask me for proof of my age.

    I think that Amazon itself should hold full details of their customers on file, including their date of birth. Then the customer could log into their account and request a pin number, which they could then give to the delivery agent - instead of having to divulge their full date of birth and full name to delivery agents, who already have their full address, which they could then SELL ON for some extra income!
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 2nd Dec 19, 11:41 PM
    • 11,378 Posts
    • 13,011 Thanks
    shaun from Africa
    Yes, but no shop in the world would ask a 71 year old woman for proof of her age before they would sell her alcohol or any other age restricted item!
    Originally posted by Technogran
    It is a legal requirement that age related ID must be shown when buying alcohol in stores in Tennessee. I know this as when I first went there, I tried to buy some beer in a store and was refused as I didn't have any photo ID on me. (I was 48 at the time).

    The store owners or servers won't get fined if they fail to ask for ID for from someone who is over 50, but failing to ask is still an offence.
    • custardy
    • By custardy 3rd Dec 19, 2:22 PM
    • 35,101 Posts
    • 29,773 Thanks
    custardy
    Oh, I did write to Amazon but they just sent a reply with a link to their Privacy Notice, which was no help at all. Furthermore, there was no way to reply to their stock reply!

    My point is that anyone with even an ounce of sense can clearly tell that I am an elderly woman (71 years old) and should NOT have to ask me for proof of my age.

    I think that Amazon itself should hold full details of their customers on file, including their date of birth. Then the customer could log into their account and request a pin number, which they could then give to the delivery agent - instead of having to divulge their full date of birth and full name to delivery agents, who already have their full address, which they could then SELL ON for some extra income!
    Originally posted by Technogran
    So what evidence have you provided to your Amazon account that proves you are over 25?
    • jimbo6977
    • By jimbo6977 6th Dec 19, 1:14 PM
    • 467 Posts
    • 265 Thanks
    jimbo6977
    1. Vermouth ??????????????????
    2. from Amazon ?????????????????

    Is this a "thing" now?

    Seems I need to get out less.
    • LilElvis
    • By LilElvis 6th Dec 19, 6:23 PM
    • 4,647 Posts
    • 12,021 Thanks
    LilElvis
    1. Vermouth ??????????????????
    2. from Amazon ?????????????????

    Is this a "thing" now?

    Seems I need to get out less.
    Originally posted by jimbo6977
    You need to drink vodka martinis more! I wouldn't mix a £30+ vodka with cheap vermouth and Amazon do stock better brands such as Noilly Prat and Lillet which aren't available in most supermarkets.
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